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Potato Sandwiches


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Dong Incheon station, in Incheon South Korea, used to have this amazing potato sandwich vendor. Three slices of lightly toasted white bread, with one layer filled with cooked ham, and the next layer filled with warm potato salad spiked with more shards of ham. The whole this was then fried in a little margarine. That and a Vegemil would cure what ails you.

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Now that I think of it, you can get a sandwich locally called "guedille" in Quebec' chip wagons that is often offered covered with french fries. Typically, it is a hot dog bun with either an egg, lobster, shrimp or chicken salad (heavy in mayo) and you get the option of adding fries on top. I believe Martin Picard has a version of this at his Montreal restaurant, Au Pied de Cochon.

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Or crazy Canucks with potato chip sarnies?

Are potato chip sandwiches Canadian?

I've lived in Canada my entire life and never even heard of someone putting potato chips on a sandwich. Is it an eastern Canadian thing?

Wherever there are sandwiches served with potato chips it's likely some will wind up between the bread slices. Kids at picnics, that sort of thing.

"Sarnies" is a very rare word for me.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Or crazy Canucks with potato chip sarnies?

Are potato chip sandwiches Canadian?

I've lived in Canada my entire life and never even heard of someone putting potato chips on a sandwich. Is it an eastern Canadian thing?

Ah but then you must not have associated with the right crazy Canucks! :biggrin:

I have lived in B.C., Alberta, Ontario and Quebec and I can't tell you where I first learned this habit but I have known quite a number of friends over the years who put chips on sandwiches. It might even date back to my days in the Forces when ketchup on toast was a favourite breakfast.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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There are more potato-focused breads in Japan, but they wouldn't qualify as "sandwiches" according to that lawsuit (which is one of the dumbest, most frivolous uses of the court system I've ever encountered).

There are buns with a hash brown (McD's style) baked in the top. They've got pretty squiggles of mayo and ketchup decorating the hash brown. I've never purchased one because it seems so...gross...but if I'm feeling brave, maybe I'll buy one and post a picture.

There are also pastries made with croissant dough that have potato salad baked onto them. I like these more than potato salad sandwiches, but I still rarely eat them because they are so rich.

I like how the Japanese have taken two very western starches and combined them to make one big super starch. No wonder they're getting bigger over here...

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Of course, after reading Prasantrin's comment about croissants with potato salad baked inside, I remembered...potato knish! It doesn't have the outer bread ratio of what I'd consider a sandwich, more of a thin dough shell encasing wonderful mashed potatoes with sauteed-until-brown onions and a healthy sprinkly of black pepper...yum

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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There are buns with a hash brown (McD's style) baked in the top.  They've got pretty squiggles of mayo and ketchup decorating the hash brown.  I've never purchased one because it seems so...gross...but if I'm feeling brave, maybe I'll buy one and post a picture.

There are also pastries made with croissant dough that have potato salad baked onto them.  I like these more than potato salad sandwiches, but I still rarely eat them because they are so rich. 

Rona, we would never force you to buy and eat such breads. :biggrin:

Here are some pictures of various Japanese potato breads.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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do potato tacos count?

Strictly speaking not a sandwich, but I've never had one. What are they like? Is it a potato-instead-of-meat thing? Or is it connected to a Meso American or Andean tradition?

I've had potato tacos (along with goat tacos) at the "Mexican Village" in the county fair. If they're well made you don't mind that there's no meat. I believe the last one I had was flavored with chorizo (it had the orangish hue like it had been cooked with chorizo but had little to no meat in it).

As for potato chips in sandwiches...it was a regular addition to sandwiches when I was a kid growing up in San Diego. I think it's a texural thing to have that little bit of crunch to go with your uber soft Wonder white bread sandwiches. :cool:

 

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Tim Oliver

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I must say I'm not a big fan.

I can see why. Even the advertising photo can't make that sandwich look good. Perhaps if they used wheat bread it would be more appealing.

However, there is nothing wrong with putting potato chips on sandwiches. In fact, growing up in New England, it was very common, especially on tuna salad sandwiches, to include a few chips (especially the ruffled style).

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Chorizo and potato tacos are really big. Also in Jerzy they have this thing called Italian Hot Dogs where you get a hot dog with potatoes, peppers, and onions on a roll..

French fry sandwiches are common..

But I really like the idea of the potato latke sandwich..

We made this cold potato puree the other day.. We ran it through a fine mesh tamis and it was a sticky sort of puree.. It was obviously filled with butter and were thinking about how good it would be cold on crusted sandwich or even mixed with gravy in a hot turkey or beef sandwich..

Edited by Daniel (log)
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The original (and still available most places) po-boy was french fries and roast beef gravy on french bread.

Interesting.

There's a restaurant in my town that will "poutinize" your roast beef sandwich by loading it with french fries, cheese curds and gravy. Yikes.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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And then of course there is the Belgian Mitraillette, a baguette filled with meat (sausage, burger), a load of french (Belgian!) fries and topped with a sauce of choice. Very commonly available in all the fry-shops.

I have never been brave enough to order one myself though...

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A chip butty dipped in the runny yolk of a fried egg is a glorious thing. As are fried potatoes in the same role. It's not quite the same with US-style French fries, though.

Crisp (potato chip) sandwiches are a common enough occurrence, but not the kind of thing you'd make specially. They're more something that happen on the fly as you eat a pack lunch or have a picnic.

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A chip butty dipped in the runny yolk of a fried egg is a glorious thing. As are fried potatoes in the same role. It's not quite the same with US-style French fries, though

Are chip butties associated with football (Gaelic or soccer) in Ireland? I'm thinking it might be like baseball's ballpark frank in the US, or strawberries at Wimbledon, etc.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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In New Orleans they have the French Fry Poboy. It's regular french fries (typically the thicker ones -- nothing thin like shoe-string) covered with gravy in a po-boy loaf.

Not a big fan of it. It's not bad, though, but oyster po-boys are much better and they're on the same menu. :cool:

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There are buns with a hash brown (McD's style) baked in the top.  They've got pretty squiggles of mayo and ketchup decorating the hash brown.  I've never purchased one because it seems so...gross...but if I'm feeling brave, maybe I'll buy one and post a picture.

Then there are potato croquette sandwiches, usually topped with tonkatsu or chuunou sauce. Not bad really, although I'm generally not a fan of cold deep-fried food. The same sandwich with a hot, just-fried croquette would be nice. (But I usually stay away from fried food.) There is at least a nice texture contrast between the crispy panko shell and soft white bun, combined with the tang of the tonkatsu sauce.

Here's an image: http://image.space.rakuten.co.jp/lg01/97/0...2c5emkm34c.jpeg

Potato salad sandwiches are good, although it must be made with Japanese-style potato salad.

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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. . . . Potato salad sandwiches are good, although it must be made with Japanese-style potato salad.
What makes a potato salad Japanese-style?

I'm with you about cold previously deep fried food -- yuck -- unless it's good chicken with a still-crunchy crust.

I associate tangy tonkatsu with grilled pork. Is that normal?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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