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Chocolate


scott4136
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Okay, so i am an aspiring freelance chocolatier and i need some help from anyone. I acquired 3 kilos of 54% velrhona chocolate and have been using it to create different molded chocolates as well as making chocolate covered cordials. it seems i have created a bit of a demand for my confections and I need more chocolate, but can't even think about where i can buy chocolate wholesale. doesn't have to be expensive, but needs to be good. preferably 64% would be ideal. if anyone can help me out, let me know. I have tried every store bought chocolate, but for some reason, i can't temper it. if you could explain this to me, also, i'd be very interested.

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I'm in Northern CA as well. Try qzina www.qzina.com, and marque foods www.marquefoods.com

In terms of chocolate, it's a very subjective and personal choice. Try some out and see which ones you like best. It's a process and you will eventually find the ones you like.

If cost is an issue, try the brand Cacao Noel at www.gourmail.com It's decent with a good price.

Luis

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...I have tried every store bought chocolate, but for some reason, i can't temper it.  if you could explain this to me, also, i'd be very interested.

depends on what you mean by "store bought". whole foods and other "gourmet" shops sell valrhona feves and other high end chocolates which should be perfectly temperable. if you mean candy bar type chocolate then additives might be the culprit...not enough cocoa butter content to temper correctly, veg oil fillers, etc. and too thick of a viscosity.

there are a lot of online sources for chocolate that are reasonable, even with shipping. of course, it is best to buy these in the winter months as shipping is cheaper and you're less likely to receive a melted/damaged product.

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such wierd responses, where are you??? we live in the new age of INTERNET!!!

http://www.chocolatesource.com/products/se...ype=30&brand=21

Buy in bulk chocolate shipped to your house!!

As for tempering... I went to culinary school... but you dont need a culinary degree to know how to temper... Im not saying your doing anything wrong... but maybe your technique is off... I have had no problems tempering even toll house chocolate...

I usually use a double boiler.... So pot, about 4 inches of water at a medium simmer, bowl up top, chocolate inside.. stir every once in a while until melted. Now the fastest way is the seeding method. By seeding i mean keep a few chunks, or nuggest of unmelted chocolate on the side, take chocolate off the heat, toss in 1-5 chucks depending on size into the melted chocolate stir and feel for temp with your upper lip. If it is no longer hot to touch, then the chocolate should be appropriately at 98 degrees, your body temp. Which is the temp chocolate should be for tempered to get your gloss.

Even with toll house chocolate i have been able to make the shiniest truffles..... So if lets say your using store bought and im guessing you would buy the best you can find... you should have no problems with tempering.

Another method... stir until you reach the temp you want, touch to your upper lip. Voila.

A quicker method... You have your bowl of melted chocolate, place that above a bowl of ice... stir stir stir, touch to lip... finished....

Another method for fastest effects, but takes the greatest care. Place chocolate in bowl, place bowl strait over fire, stir, once chocolate is melted, be sure to pull off the chocolate when there are still a few chunks, the heat will carry over and burn your chocolate if your not careful. Once there are a few chunks left, pull it off and stir till the rest are melted, you should be very close to your temp if you did it right, if not right now, and it is now at your "tempered point"

GOOD LUCK!

Edited by SeanDirty (log)

**********************************************

I may be in the gutter, but I am still staring at the stars.

**********************************************

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This might a good place to ask my question and Kerry Beal had assured me that my ignorant head would not get bitten off in the pastry forum, unlike in other forums. So ........

I learnt about El Rey in this forum some years ago, reading praise for both the Mijao 61% and Apamate 73%. Going to their site, I discovered that both of these come from a product line "all-purpose presentations flavored with natural

vanilla":

Carenero Superior

Apamate Dark Chocolate 73.5%

Gran Saman Dark Chocolate 70%

Mijao Dark Chocolate 61%

Bucare Dark Chocolate 58.5%

Caoba Milk Chocolate 41%

Apparently free (?) of vanilla the Rio Caribe line comprises:

Macuro 70%

Cariaco 60.5%

Irapa 40.5%

A. The El Rey Company has the best prices I have found, when quantity, selection and shipping [all three] are taken into account. If I am wrong, I would be grateful for more information.

D-Wholesale Carenero Superior Discos (22 lbs. of quarter-size disks of a single chocolate)

Two 11 lb. boxes of a single chocolate.

FREE FEDEX GROUND SHIPPING. NO MORE CHOPPIN' CHOCOLATE!

E-Wholesale Rio Caribe Discos (22 lbs. of quarter-size disks of a single chocolate)

Two 11 lb. boxes of a single chocolate.

FREE FEDEX GROUND SHIPPING. NO MORE CHOPPIN' CHOCOLATE!

Price: $170.50

B-Wholesale Mixed Blocks (22.0 lbs. of a combination of chocolates)

A combination of 10 2.2 lb. blocks of chocolate.

FREE FEDEX GROUNDSHIPPING .

Price: $170.50

http://sales.chocolateselrey.com/-strse-Wh.../Categories.bok

B. Ideally, I would have preferred a purchase of 11 lb Mijao + 11 lb Apamate discos, had they been available for the 22 lb bulk lot. That is not the case. One has to buy only a SINGLE TYPE.

C. I am leaning towards MIJAO, 22 lbso discos. It is an eating chocolate as well, that can be made into Christmas presents for cookies. A bit sweet for inclusion in beverages, hot cocoa?

What is the difference between this and Cariaco?

Gran Saman ------------ Mariaco

Mijao ----------------------Cariaco

I would be most grateful for any inputs that would help me choose among these four, or Apamate/Macuro, making 6. Eating + cooking. Discos.

There is the option of the 22 lb combo block, that would appear to be the ideal solution to my unnecessary dilemma, but there is a crucial problem there: sufficient quantity of any one kind.

Many thanks.

Gautam.

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If you're cooking only for your own family, then using the chocolate-to-lips tempering method will be just fine; otherwise, it's not considered a very clean way to work.

If you're looking for a fast way to temper, many have posted here about using the microwave on LOW. You never want to put chocolate directly on the fire since it'll scorch in a split second.

I don't like the double-boiler method because of the risk of getting moisture in your chocolate which will cause it to seize; however, if you're careful this can be fine.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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If you're cooking only for your own family, then using the chocolate-to-lips tempering method will be just fine; otherwise, it's not considered a very clean way to work.

If you're looking for a fast way to temper, many have posted here about using the microwave on LOW.  You never want to put chocolate directly on the fire since it'll scorch in a split second.

I don't like the double-boiler method because of the risk of getting moisture in your chocolate which will cause it to seize; however, if you're careful this can be fine.

Thinking of it, i agree chocolate to lips isnt a very clean way to cook... From a cooks standpoint its just a nasty habit most of us have.... As you pastry folk work much much different from us outlaws.

**********************************************

I may be in the gutter, but I am still staring at the stars.

**********************************************

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An alternative to putting chocolate to your lips is to use metal bowls and place the inside of your wrist (behind your palm) on the outside of the bowl. The bowl should feel just a slight bit warmer than your wrist. Of course your body temp may vary a bit. In general, this temp is going to be near the bottom of the tempering curve (e.g. 82 - 84 degrees F). Depending on your chocolate, the working temp will be just a few degrees F above this.

If you're cooking only for your own family, then using the chocolate-to-lips tempering method will be just fine; otherwise, it's not considered a very clean way to work.

If you're looking for a fast way to temper, many have posted here about using the microwave on LOW.  You never want to put chocolate directly on the fire since it'll scorch in a split second.

I don't like the double-boiler method because of the risk of getting moisture in your chocolate which will cause it to seize; however, if you're careful this can be fine.

Thinking of it, i agree chocolate to lips isnt a very clean way to cook... From a cooks standpoint its just a nasty habit most of us have.... As you pastry folk work much much different from us outlaws.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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One of the most indispensable tools in my Chocolate Kitchen is an Infrared Thermometer. A little expensive, yes, but what a savings in time both in cleaning up and actually taking the measurement. Very fast, very accurate, very clean.

My only regret is that I didn't buy one sooner.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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One of the most indispensable tools in my Chocolate Kitchen is an Infrared Thermometer.  A little expensive, yes, but what a savings in time both in cleaning up and actually taking the measurement.  Very fast, very accurate, very clean.

My only regret is that I didn't buy one sooner.

It sure makes life easier doesn't it? Doesn't get in the way of stirring your chocolate, no cleaning required. Worth every penny!

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One of the most indispensable tools in my Chocolate Kitchen is an Infrared Thermometer.  A little expensive, yes, but what a savings in time both in cleaning up and actually taking the measurement.  Very fast, very accurate, very clean.

My only regret is that I didn't buy one sooner.

It sure makes life easier doesn't it? Doesn't get in the way of stirring your chocolate, no cleaning required. Worth every penny!

Definitely! :biggrin:

ETA: Also, I don't have to have 3 or 4 probe thermometers all over the kitchen while waiting for something to cool...

Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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the thing with these infrared thermometers is that i get a different reading every time i only change the distance to the bowl a tiny little bit. maybe i just bought the wrong one... ??

cheers

t.

I don't find that with the one I have. I stir well before measuring.

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the thing with these infrared thermometers is that i get a different reading every time i only change the distance to the bowl a tiny little bit. maybe i just bought the wrong one... ??

cheers

t.

I don't find that with the one I have. I stir well before measuring.

How expensive...ballpark...is expensive? And just how do you use this thermometer? Hold it just above the bubbling syrup? Does it have some kind of grip on it?

Thanks.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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the thing with these infrared thermometers is that i get a different reading every time i only change the distance to the bowl a tiny little bit. maybe i just bought the wrong one... ??

cheers

t.

I don't find that with the one I have. I stir well before measuring.

How expensive...ballpark...is expensive? And just how do you use this thermometer? Hold it just above the bubbling syrup? Does it have some kind of grip on it?

Thanks.

Expense: varies... Mine was about $65

Use: Point it at a well stirred bowl of whatever

Caveat: can't really use it to check temp of a boiling liquid.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Don't recall what I paid on e-bay for mine, but it's street value is somewhere between $100 and $150. It's a Cooper 451, been replaced with another model for about the same price.

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Speaking of chocolate, and thinking about balancing ganaches via Schneich's formula, how do you determine the relative fat and sugar percentages of a given chocolate? If I have the cacao percentage, is the remainder necessarily sugar, or are there other factors? How do I know what portion of the cacao percentage is cocoa butter? I feel like I'm missing something.

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