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Bastard condiments?


Recoil Rob
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mayo with hot smoked paprika mixed in...with sweet potato spears to dip...mmmm :cool:

This isn't reply at I can't figure out to just add a comment. But anyway my favorite bastard condiment has to be: mayo, siracha, habenro mustard and a little soy. :raz:

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast"

Oscar Wilde

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mayo with hot smoked paprika mixed in...with sweet potato spears to dip...mmmm :cool:

This isn't reply at I can't figure out to just add a comment. But anyway my favorite bastard condiment has to be: mayo, siracha, habenro mustard and a little soy. :raz:

Another favorite is Balsamic vinegar + mayo with hard boild eggs= goodness!

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast"

Oscar Wilde

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This isn't reply at I can't figure out to just add a comment. But anyway my favorite bastard condiment has to be: mayo, siracha, habenro mustard and a little soy. :raz:

Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you'll see "fast reply" (for simple replies that don't require any special frills) and "add reply" (for when you want to add links, bolding, italics, etc.) buttons. Then you can reply without quoting anyone else's post.

Mustard + Ketchup + Horseradish

I love it on any kind of fried potatoes especially Tator Tots

Isn't that kind of like seafood cocktail sauce? I make cocktail sauce with ketchup and horseradish, but no mustard. Do you use regular mustard or dijon?

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Isn't that kind of like seafood cocktail sauce?  I make cocktail sauce with ketchup and horseradish, but no mustard.  Do you use regular mustard or dijon?

I normally use just plain yellow mustard but if I'm feeling adventurous I'll use dijon and occasionally I'll even add a little Coleman's dry mustard to add a little more spice. I've ever heard that being called a cocktail sauce but I guess ketchup and horseradish is so it's very close.

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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Oooh ... I don't really get very creative this way as a rule, but I have certainly got to try a couple ... or a few .. of these soon!

Another thing I'm going to try soon (which I just read about the other day as a sauce for something there is no way I'm ever going to make in its entirety), is basil mayonnaise. I've put all kinds of things in mayo for one reason or another, but basil sounds like it might be a winner. How did I miss that??

Lynn

Oregon, originally Montreal

Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "holy shit! ....what a ride!"

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Just made a first stab at dynamite sauce.

Got the smooth richness of the kewpie Mayo followed by a stab in the throat from the Wasabi.

Is the colour right or should I add more Wasabi and any other ingredients?

3015652372_c4326908ed.jpg

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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Equal parts mayo and mustard, horseradish, and two dashes of Worcestershire for veggie dipping (raw or deep fried) and makes a good side for pigs in a blanket as well. I also spread the bread with it for tomato sandwiches. Substitute lemon for the Worcestershire for meats and seafood. Sub wasabi for horseradish and soy for Worcestershire for hubby's grilled fish. Leave out the horseradish for egg or potato salad.

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  • 9 years later...

It was in the news this morning:

"Heinz Is Threatening to Release 'Mayochup' Nationwide and the Internet Is Torn"

 

Their name for it sucks and is completely uncreative. I preferred some of the names posted in Twitter mentioned in the article.

 

So is this new bastard condiment a sign of the impending Apocalypse? xD

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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When I was in college my roommate's boyfriend made this salad dressing that was absolutely delicious. He said it was Russian dressing, and I asked him how he made it. He said, it's ketchup and mayonnaise mixed together. And I said, oh c'mon Mike, what is it? And he said, no really, it's ketchup and mayonnaise mixed together. I refused to believe it, but he kept insisting! :laugh: That was in the early seventies. It's still delicious. (And it's still ketchup and mayonnaise.) 

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37 minutes ago, cakewalk said:

When I was in college my roommate's boyfriend made this salad dressing that was absolutely delicious. He said it was Russian dressing, and I asked him how he made it. He said, it's ketchup and mayonnaise mixed together. And I said, oh c'mon Mike, what is it? And he said, no really, it's ketchup and mayonnaise mixed together. I refused to believe it, but he kept insisting! :laugh: That was in the early seventies. It's still delicious. (And it's still ketchup and mayonnaise.) 

Back in the 50s, during hot summers, my mother, who didn't really like to cook, often made a big chef's salad for dinner for the five of us. To the usual greens, she'd add sliced hard-boiled eggs, ham and cheese for protein, and throw in leftover veggies from previous dinners - green beans, peas, corn, carrots, etc., - along with a smattering of whatever else we had had the previous few nights. She'd put it into this huge salad bowl and toss it up with a big dollop of mayo & a few hearty smacks on the bottom of the ketchup bottle. 

 

We all loved it. 

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Hiya, Cakewalk. 

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Speaking of mixing stuff with mayo for condiments, was anyone else watching Masterchef Jr the other night when Gordon et all stirred pesto into mayo to make a sauce that he then used as a hamburger spread and as a dip for fries? Looked pretty good. Definitely going to give that a try. I mean, pesto & mayo...how could you go wrong with that?

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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This was my salad dressing as a kid.  My folks were into that "nasty" to me at that age, bleu cheese stuff.

Funny I actually served it to my not-yet husband and he was so impressed with my cooking skills.  Took

awhile to admit what it was.  He still stuck around so either it was really tasty or it was true love (for me).

We still use it for fries and  with clam strips with a little relish added.  

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