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Gianduja


Darienne
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:biggrin: I started this topic in November 08 from our home away from home in Moab. Well, I finally did it. I made my own Gianduja.

Not I'm not saying that it was 'good' and it certainly wasn't according to Hoyle but it got done. I have only a food processor, so of course the resultant hazelnut paste was grainy. 150 grams paste mixed with about 350 grams combined milk and dark chocolate. Hmmmm... :hmmm: pretty grainy. Added some chopped walnuts to disguise the graininess and it worked. Poured it out onto a silpat, sprinkled Fleur de sel on top, cut it up. Yummy. Just had another piece to make sure it was still yummy today. And it was. :laugh:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I made some Gianduja yesterday using Greweling's recipe of 1 : 1.25 : 1 (nuts : milk chocolate : confectioner's sugar). I roasted the nuts really well and threw them hot into my food processor with 25% of the sugar. The recipe says that you just can't process the mixture too much at this point. My first stop was a very nice nut flour. (Nice to know.) But I was going for gianduja, so I continued. Took longer than I thought but finally condensed into a liquid. Whirred a bit more and I added about 50% of the remaining sugar and the milk chocolate, processing just enough to mix.

It's got a delicious nutty taste and is surprisingly smooth, just a touch of graininess which I do not find off-putting at all. Surprisingly soft, not sure why it didn't get hard when refrigerated. The consistency is a little bit stiff for piping (though still possible) and a little too soft for dipping (though, again, with an added foot, this would be possible).

I used quite a bit less sugar than the classic ratio specified by Greweling; though, he does say it's just a starting point. Overall, I'm pleased with it. It'll be interesting to see how this batch mellows over the next few days.

I think I'll put it into a dark chocolate shell or maybe add some coffee to it for a marriage made in heaven.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I made Greweling's hazelnut Gianduja last year. Again, just in a food processor at home - although it was perhaps not as smooth as a commercial product the texture wasn't that far off, and I didn't have any setting problems using the ratios in the book (but thinking back it may have been a bit sweeter that I would choose). It's definately worth a play with

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I made some Gianduja yesterday using Greweling's recipe of 1 : 1.25 : 1 (nuts : milk chocolate : confectioner's sugar). I roasted the nuts really well and threw them hot into my food processor with 25% of the sugar. The recipe says that you just can't process the mixture too much at this point. My first stop was a very nice nut flour. (Nice to know.) But I was going for gianduja, so I continued. Took longer than I thought but finally condensed into a liquid. Whirred a bit more and I added about 50% of the remaining sugar and the milk chocolate, processing just enough to mix.

It's got a delicious nutty taste and is surprisingly smooth, just a touch of graininess which I do not find off-putting at all. Surprisingly soft, not sure why it didn't get hard when refrigerated. The consistency is a little bit stiff for piping (though still possible) and a little too soft for dipping (though, again, with an added foot, this would be possible).

I used quite a bit less sugar than the classic ratio specified by Greweling; though, he does say it's just a starting point. Overall, I'm pleased with it. It'll be interesting to see how this batch mellows over the next few days.

I think I'll put it into a dark chocolate shell or maybe add some coffee to it for a marriage made in heaven.

I make Greweling's hazelnut gianduja and pipe it as soon as it's reached something near room temp into chocolate cups that I mold ahead of time. I then top it with a whole roasted hazelnut. It's really delicious and looks very nice. The down side to piping gianduja into a shell is that you get "fat bloom" after a while on the shell. I simply make less of them more often which has worked well so far. You can make the chocolate cups pretty far in advance as long as you can store them. Sorry for the fuzzy pic. I need to get some good photos taken.

Toasted Hazelnut Cup.jpg

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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  • 2 weeks later...

Last night I was carelessly humming along, thinking about chocolate and tahini, wondering what delicious cake or mousse could be found on the internet. (Now, for those who have been less than enthusiastic about the use of the internet for recipes, this IS a use for the internet: looking up unusual or unknown recipes.) Found a few, but I lacked either the enthusiasm for said recipe or a key ingredient.

So...I turned my thoughts to making some kind of gianduja using chocolate and tahini. I am not sure how much I liked it. DH liked it just fine. I'll try again and this time put the proper amount of sugar into it.

Any one else try making gianduja using other nut pastes/butters? And can you call them gianduja? Greweling simply states that gianduja is 'nearly always hazelnuts or almonds'. Not heavily prescriptive, so I suppose you could.

We simply ate it all plain.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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And so I made the tahini gianduja again with icing sugar a la Greweling...except that I used only 3/4 of his allotment of sugar. Couldn't really say what it tasted like. Not gianduja.

Then DH had some after lunch and said...this tastes very much like chocolate halvah...and so it does. Lacks all texture and no doubt other qualities, but yes, it does taste like chocolate halvah. :laugh:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 7 months later...

I'm sorry if someone has already answered this, if they have I can't find it.

Why can't the gianduja be made by mixing the nut paste into tempered chocolate as opposed to tempering after the two ingredients have been mixed together?

It likely can - but the eutectic effect of the nut oil will change the tempering temperatures.

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Thanks for your reply Kerry.

I understand that but if the nut paste is added when at the same temperature as the tempered chocolate, for eg about a degree before the lowest temper temperature, then theory wise it wouldnt affect the temper.

Maybe I'm being silly but it's just something that interests and bothers me. Its no problem for me to temper the gianduja as opposed to adding the paste to the tempered chocolate but it bugs me because I understand the explanation but it doesnt make sense to me.

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Thanks for your reply Kerry.

I understand that but if the nut paste is added when at the same temperature as the tempered chocolate, for eg about a degree before the lowest temper temperature, then theory wise it wouldnt affect the temper.

Maybe I'm being silly but it's just something that interests and bothers me. Its no problem for me to temper the gianduja as opposed to adding the paste to the tempered chocolate but it bugs me because I understand the explanation but it doesnt make sense to me.

Dark choc working temp is about 33, milk 31, white 30 or so - gianduju about 27 or 28 C. So adding the nut paste to 31 degree milk chocolate means you need to seed down to about 27 or cool to around 23 - 24 then warm back to 27 or so to temper.

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Thank you all for all the info and tips on how to make your own gianduja, I have recently made a mission to accomplish that and this tread has been very useful.

I might be asking an amateur question, but anyway... Using a wet grinder to make hazelnut paste would be step #2- first step being puttting hazelnuts in a food processor or something similar until you get the liquid consistency and then transfer to grinder and process for as long as you need in order get the paste fine enough? In that case, I am guessing you don't need to add oil to the grinder since it's already liquid?

I have both the food processor and the grinder ready, do you think it will work that way?

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Thank you all for all the info and tips on how to make your own gianduja, I have recently made a mission to accomplish that and this tread has been very useful.

I might be asking an amateur question, but anyway... Using a wet grinder to make hazelnut paste would be step #2- first step being puttting hazelnuts in a food processor or something similar until you get the liquid consistency and then transfer to grinder and process for as long as you need in order get the paste fine enough? In that case, I am guessing you don't need to add oil to the grinder since it's already liquid?

I have both the food processor and the grinder ready, do you think it will work that way?

Ana,

Welcome to eGullet. With both a processor and a grinder I would proceed exactly as you suggest. Extra oil not needed. Would love to see your results.

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Thanks again kerry for your advice. I made the pistachio gianduja (looks like baby poo as I used white chocolate), thought it was tempered but its still too soft, so Ill do it again :rolleyes:

Ana: you need to put small amounts at a time in the grinder (I used the santha) and be ready with to add a tiny bit of oil (depending on how oily the nuts are, I used pecan and they were a bit dry) otherwise it either clogs the grinders or starts rising up out of the bowl. I panicked a bit and added to much oil so the paste came out too runny

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I gave it a try and it worked out great, didn't have to add any oil, it was still quite liquid...

I love how easy and quick it is when you have the right equipment, I'm sure I'll be doing this often...

Thanks again for you help

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  • 8 years later...
On 12/26/2008 at 7:17 AM, Kerry Beal said:

You can use gianduja like a soft chocolate ie it will mold, it can be tempered (2ºC less than white chocolate at each step)

As I understand, I can temper gianduja just like I temper chocolate, heat it, cool it, stir, etc. Just use lower temperatures. How to tell if it is properly tempered? Is there a tempering test like that for chocolate?

 

thanks!

konstanitn 

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8 hours ago, akonsu said:

As I understand, I can temper gianduja just like I temper chocolate, heat it, cool it, stir, etc. Just use lower temperatures. How to tell if it is properly tempered? Is there a tempering test like that for chocolate?

 

thanks!

konstanitn 

Same way - put a little on a offset or piece of parchment - it won't snap but it should firm up after a while and be glossy and not streaky.

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