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Gianduja


Darienne
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My self-appointed task while in Moab is to try to make all the basic confections that I have never made before, including Gianduja which is to be next. :smile:

- any one made it? I did look it up in eGullet and couldn't find much that spoke to my concerns. I am not good at looking up things in eGullet yet.

- with almonds or hazelnuts?

- is there a better /easier/ different recipe than in Greweling? There is very little in my other books or even on the web. There is one recipe in eGullet and it is not what I am looking for, although it does look tasty.

- do you have to get all the skins off the hazelnuts?

- could you start with a commercial almond/nut butter if you wanted to? If you could find one without salt or sugar?

- can you temper it in a tempering machine after it is made?

So far I have decided to make it with almonds, ground in my Champion grinder/juicer and mixed with only 2/3rds the amount of sugar called for and 63% dark Guittard chocolate couverture.

Please feel free to answer any or all of my questions and comment on my tentative plan.

Thanks.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Definatelly hazelnut ( I am purist since Gianduja is hazelnut in Italy )

Anyway, you could use commercial ready hazelnut ( nut ) paste, I have used the italian one 100% hazelnut paste, its very good quality and the results are great. I dont have a commercial grade food processor or the like so make it myself is out of the question, because you will never reach the smoothness of the commercial one.

When you mix the melted chocolate with the nut paste you have to temper the mass, you dont need to use tempering machine, but can be slabbed on a marble slab, I dont have one so I just put the mass on a ice bath and I mix untill nice smooth and start to thicken.

The % for chocolate and nut paste can vary, I also use some clarified butter in it.

If you skin the hazelnuts you can toast them into the oven then put them in a kitchen towel or towel and rub them untill the skin come off.

Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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Definatelly hazelnut ( I am purist since Gianduja is hazelnut in Italy )

Anyway, you could use commercial ready hazelnut ( nut ) paste, I have used the italian one 100% hazelnut paste, its very good quality and the results are great. I dont have a commercial grade food processor or the like so make it myself is out of the question, because you will never reach the smoothness of the commercial one.

When you mix the melted chocolate with the nut paste you have to temper the  mass, you dont need to use  tempering machine, but can be slabbed on a marble slab, I dont have one so I just put the mass on a ice bath and I mix untill nice smooth and start to thicken.

The % for chocolate and nut paste can vary, I also use some clarified butter in it.

If you skin the hazelnuts you can toast them into the oven then put them in a kitchen towel or towel and rub them untill the skin come off.

Thanks for the information Desiderio. I still think I will give it a try. Stubborn and I just want to. :biggrin:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 4 weeks later...
Thanks for the information Desiderio.  I still think I will give it a try.  Stubborn and I just want to. :biggrin:

Not all that stubborn in the end.

Finally gave in and bought some Cacao Barry Gianduja and it just arrived today. Delicious. :wub::wub::wub: Omigod and I don't even like milk chocolate. I will have to hide it from myself or I'll never make anything from it...I'll simply eat it all!

Now that I have fallen in love all over again...what should I make with it? :huh:

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Thanks for the information Desiderio.  I still think I will give it a try.  Stubborn and I just want to. :biggrin:

Not all that stubborn in the end.

Finally gave in and bought some Cacao Barry Gianduja and it just arrived today. Delicious. :wub::wub::wub: Omigod and I don't even like milk chocolate. I will have to hide it from myself or I'll never make anything from it...I'll simply eat it all!

Now that I have fallen in love all over again...what should I make with it? :huh:

Isn't it lovely stuff. I find myself nibbling on it every time I take it out to work with.

You can heat it slightly with your heat gun while beating it in the mixer, lighten it up to a fluffy texture and pipe it in little swirls on top of a chocolate disc then dip part way up. Or immerse the swirls in a sugar solution for a crystalline finish. It's in one of JP Wybauw's books.

Nice also mixed with rice crisps.

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Isn't it lovely stuff.  I find myself nibbling on it every time I take it out to work with. 

You can heat it slightly with your heat gun while beating it in the mixer, lighten it up to a fluffy texture and pipe it in little swirls on top of a chocolate disc then dip part way up.  Or immerse the swirls in a sugar solution for a crystalline finish.  It's in one of JP Wybauw's books.

Nice also mixed with rice crisps.

thanks, Kerry. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Maybe I missed completely what you were asking, but I thought you wanted to make gianduja right? WHy didnt you order some pure hazelnut paste instead then you can make the gianduja the way you want, If I had a commercial grade food processor or a "raffinatrice" to grind the hazelnuts to a paste I wou;d make my own but for now I get the hazelnut paste then you can make gianduja with different chocolates etc.

Vanessa

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Maybe I missed completely what you were asking, but I thought you wanted to make gianduja right? WHy didnt you order some pure hazelnut paste instead then you can make the gianduja the way you want, If I had a commercial grade food processor or a "raffinatrice" to grind the hazelnuts to a paste I wou;d make my own but for  now I get the hazelnut paste then you can make gianduja with different chocolates etc.

Dear Desiderio,

You did not miss the point at all. :smile: I did intend to make it from scratch. But then time passed and other difficulties intervened :sad: ...as difficulties in life will...and the project was derailed. And then someone suggested that I simply order it. And I did.

I will follow your advice next time and order the hazelnut paste. And then mix it with 70% dark, my favorite.

Thanks again for your advice. As you can see, you were totally on track. I simply switched tracks. :blink:

Edited to correct typos. 'detrailed' might even be a useful word....

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Oh noo, I wanted just make sure I got the point , you know sometimes I totally miss it :wacko: ,I did buy some of the Barry gianduja as well when I fist started , its good stuff indeed and you can still make some good chocolates or confection with it. I wish you luck for the Holidays experiments and confections :smile:

Vanessa

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  • 4 weeks later...

I thought maybe I could just tack this question onto this thread. I did buy some Gianduja and used it in a ganache. Fine.

Question is: can you use Gianduja as a couverture to enrobe other bits or to dip things into? It seems so very soft to begin with and I just thought I'd ask before trying it perhaps in vain.

Searched eGullet without finding any references to using Gianduja to enrobe anything and also looked at Google and found nothing. That usually would signify that there is nothing to fine and that Gianduja is not suitable for coating other things.

Thanks. :wink:

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I thought maybe I could just tack this question onto this thread.  I did buy some Gianduja and used it in a ganache.  Fine.

Question is:  can you use Gianduja as a couverture to enrobe other bits or to dip things into?  It seems so very soft to begin with and I just thought I'd ask before trying it perhaps in vain.

Searched eGullet without finding any references to using Gianduja to enrobe anything and also looked at Google and found nothing.  That usually would signify that there is nothing to fine and that Gianduja is not suitable for coating other things.

Thanks.  :wink:

You can use gianduja like a soft chocolate ie it will mold, it can be tempered (2ºC less than white chocolate at each step) - but I'm not sure how well it will behave for enrobing. Technically I'm sure it can be done, but I'm not sure if the product will melt too easily when touched with your fingers and whether it will flavour other things in the box.

Why don't you give it a try and see?

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You can use gianduja like a soft chocolate ie it will mold, it can be tempered (2ºC less than white chocolate at each step) - but I'm not sure how well it will behave for enrobing.  Technically I'm sure it can be done, but I'm not sure if the product will melt too easily when touched with your fingers and whether it will flavour other things in the box. 

Why don't you give it a try and see?

Thanks for the information re tempering Gianduja. I had no idea.

And no, I don't think I'll give it a try at enrobing. If you don't do it...then I'm not doing it either, seeing as you know a lot and I know very little yet.

Besides, we are heading home in a very few days and I am going to use up all the rest of my 63% Guittard making nut and chocolate tiny muffin shapes to snack on on the way home.

Thanks for all the information you have given me! :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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And no, I don't think I'll give it a try at enrobing.  If you don't do it...then I'm not doing it either, seeing as you know a lot and I know very little yet.

Don't think of it like that. Imagine all of the things that wouldn't exist if nobody tried it because nobody else was doing it! Experiment. If it works, awesome. If not, at least you'll know for sure. I've done a few things I'm proud of that I've never seen/heard of before. If I hadn't given them a shot because those who know more than me hadn't done it (that I'm aware of), I'd never have known. I very rarely post my day-to-day stuff here, in most cases the things I post are the results of experiments and ideas. Some good, some not so good... but still fun.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I agree - just cause I haven't done it doesn't mean it can't, or shouldn't be done. Lots of things in this world I've never done.

I wonder if you took gianduja and aerated it a la Greweling in your cream siphon if you'd get the most righteous Aero bar ever?

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you should try making some from scratch. It's not that difficult to do. You also don't need a commercial food proscessor. of course they are much better, but I get acceptable results with a cheapy $50 processor. In fact it's the same model we used in the schotts class. I think it tastes much better made from scratch in my opinion.

luis

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you should try making some from scratch. It's not that difficult to do. You also don't need a commercial food proscessor. of course they are much better, but I get acceptable results with a cheapy $50 processor. In fact it's the same model we used in the schotts class. I think it tastes much better made from scratch in my opinion.

luis

As I am working toward using organic products and can't find an organic hazelnut paste I wanted to try my hand at making my own. While working with chocoalatiers in Italy (who use A LOT of hazelnut paste) I asked about making my own. Paul DeBondt sometimes uses his 'Bimby' to make hazelnut paste but says it doesn't get fine enough to make a very smooth gianduja. I asked about using the Santha wet grinder. The chocolatiers I spoke to didn't think the Santha would grind fine enough. I decided to ask John Nanci of Chocolate Alchemy about it. He said it would absolutely work - he's done it himself. Does anyone know if Chocolate Alchemy will be offering the Santha again? - it hasn't been offered for a few months now... Luis, how smooth does the food processor make your paste? Do you add oil or just use the nuts? Thanks!

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you should try making some from scratch. It's not that difficult to do. You also don't need a commercial food proscessor. of course they are much better, but I get acceptable results with a cheapy $50 processor. In fact it's the same model we used in the schotts class. I think it tastes much better made from scratch in my opinion.

luis

As I am working toward using organic products and can't find an organic hazelnut paste I wanted to try my hand at making my own. While working with chocoalatiers in Italy (who use A LOT of hazelnut paste) I asked about making my own. Paul DeBondt sometimes uses his 'Bimby' to make hazelnut paste but says it doesn't get fine enough to make a very smooth gianduja. I asked about using the Santha wet grinder. The chocolatiers I spoke to didn't think the Santha would grind fine enough. I decided to ask John Nanci of Chocolate Alchemy about it. He said it would absolutely work - he's done it himself. Does anyone know if Chocolate Alchemy will be offering the Santha again? - it hasn't been offered for a few months now... Luis, how smooth does the food processor make your paste? Do you add oil or just use the nuts? Thanks!

John usually has the Santhas again within a few months. He has to special order the model he has had them adapt and then he has to wait for shipping from India and they don't come air freight unfortunately. I'm sure he can tell you when he'll have them next.

It would work well to make nut pastes - just make sure no water contaminates it.

I can make a pretty smooth almond paste with my Cuisinart DLC-X.

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No, no, don't misunderstand me. I am all for trying stuff that has not been done before. That is how I reached a unexpected pinnacle in my 'other' life with gourds.

However, I have never been a 'cook' of any kind. And while we have been in Moab, I have made so many things which I had never made before: candying peels and fruits of different kinds, hard tack lollipops, divinity, bark, orange sticks, chocolate coated nuts and coffee beans, etc, etc. And you can see that these are not sophisticated items to make. And I have had a great number of 'learning experiences' aka disasters, including emergency dental surgery for a tooth broken on one of my candying disasters...

And I still have never made marzipan or fondant or a myriad of other confections that some of you made...at your Mother's knee.

This is still all so new to me. I'll make Gianduja from scratch some year in the future. Right now, I'll settle for buying the hazelnut paste and mixing it with chocolate. This time around, I simply bought premade Gianduja from a Utah chocolate supplier.

It is interesting to embark on a new and unknown passion quite well on into life after 'retiring' in one sense or other from former lives. One goes from level of 'expert' or some such thing, to complete novice, learning, learning, learning.... I wouldn't have it any other way. Keeps one young(ish). :smile:

(Sorry, writing is another passion...)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I can make a pretty smooth almond paste with my Cuisinart DLC-X.

Hey Kerry, do you use oil when making your almond paste or just plain nuts? Any tricks I should know about? I should try my food processor before buying yet another piece of equipment!

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I can make a pretty smooth almond paste with my Cuisinart DLC-X.

Hey Kerry, do you use oil when making your almond paste or just plain nuts? Any tricks I should know about? I should try my food processor before buying yet another piece of equipment!

Yup, try the food processor first. Blanch almonds and peel, leave them a bit wet before grinding.

I've lost the copy of my recipe in Mastercook (never call a recipe by the same name as one that's already in Mastercook). I'll see if I can find a hard copy somewhere in the house and post it for you.

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Here we go. From Better than Store Bought - by Helen Witty. I love her cookbooks.

1/2 lb blanched almonds (or ground almonds)

2 tbsp water

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup water

2 tbsp white corn syrup

1/4 tsp almond extract or several drops bitter almond oil

Put almonds in oven at 250 degrees until just heated though - not toasted. Grind in food processor adding the 2 tbsp water. Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl frequently and process until there is no graininess when pinched between your fingers. Bring sugar, 1/2 cup water and corn syrup to boil and cook to 235ºF. Add extract or bitter almond oil to nuts in processor, turn on processor and pour syrup through feed tube. Process until uniformly combined. Wrap in parchment, then plastic (I vacuum seal) and age in fridge for a week.

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Here we go.  From Better than Store Bought - by Helen Witty.  I love her cookbooks.

1/2 lb blanched almonds (or ground almonds)

2 tbsp water

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup water

2 tbsp white corn syrup

1/4 tsp almond extract or several drops bitter almond oil

Put almonds in oven at 250 degrees until just heated though - not toasted.  Grind in food processor adding the 2 tbsp water.  Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl frequently and process until there is no graininess when pinched between your fingers.  Bring sugar, 1/2 cup water and corn syrup to boil and cook to 235ºF.  Add extract or bitter almond oil to nuts in processor, turn on processor and pour syrup through feed tube.  Process until uniformly combined.  Wrap in parchment, then plastic (I vacuum seal) and age in fridge for a week.

Thanks so much Kerry. I'm going to try this with hazelnuts and see how it works.

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Here we go.  From Better than Store Bought - by Helen Witty.  I love her cookbooks.

1/2 lb blanched almonds (or ground almonds)

2 tbsp water

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup water

2 tbsp white corn syrup

1/4 tsp almond extract or several drops bitter almond oil

Put almonds in oven at 250 degrees until just heated though - not toasted.  Grind in food processor adding the 2 tbsp water.  Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl frequently and process until there is no graininess when pinched between your fingers.  Bring sugar, 1/2 cup water and corn syrup to boil and cook to 235ºF.  Add extract or bitter almond oil to nuts in processor, turn on processor and pour syrup through feed tube.  Process until uniformly combined.  Wrap in parchment, then plastic (I vacuum seal) and age in fridge for a week.

Thanks so much Kerry. I'm going to try this with hazelnuts and see how it works.

Not sure if this will give you a traditional hazelnut paste - they are thinner - more like a thin peanut butter (at least the stuff without sugar). That I make like peanut butter in my Sumeet spice grinder which is like a coffee grinder on steroids. But it will probably still taste great - mifgt want the nuts a bit more toasted for flavour.

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Not sure if this will give you a traditional hazelnut paste - they are thinner - more like a thin peanut butter (at least the stuff without sugar).  That I make like peanut butter in my Sumeet spice grinder which is like a coffee grinder on steroids.  But it will probably still taste great - mifgt want the nuts a bit more toasted for flavour.

Kerry - you're amazing! My goodness you're a wealth of information! What I'm interested in is making hazelnut paste which I can then use to make gianduja. I would like to make both sweetened (hazelnut praline) and unsweetened (hazelnut paste). Yes, the store bought versions are quite runny which is what I would need. Sooooooo... does the Sumeet multi-grind actually give you smooth nut butters????!!! I see that it has a 1/2HP motor - pretty powerful. The Santha melangeur sold on Chocolate Alchemy has a 1/4HP motor. I know I'm not comparing apples to apples here but here's the million dollar question... which do you think would do a better job in making a true hazelnut paste (with very little discernable 'grit' - ie. VERY SMOOTH)? Wow, this is exciting!

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