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Meyer lemons


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Speaking of Meyers - I just bought a house and want to start an edible garden. It turns out that meyers are a cross between a lemon and an orange and I want to use as many heirloom veges, etc. as possible. Can someone recommend a lemon tree that I can get in New Zealand which is not a hybrid?

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Speaking of Meyers - I just bought a house and want to start an edible garden.  It turns out that meyers are a cross between a lemon and an orange and I want to use as many heirloom veges, etc. as possible.  Can someone recommend a lemon tree that I can get in New Zealand which is not a hybrid?

Lisbon variety is a good one

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Speaking of Meyers - I just bought a house and want to start an edible garden.  It turns out that meyers are a cross between a lemon and an orange and I want to use as many heirloom veges, etc. as possible.  Can someone recommend a lemon tree that I can get in New Zealand which is not a hybrid?

Um, all lemons are hybrids. Citrus that are ancestral are citrons, pummelos, papedas and mandarin (although many commercial "mandarin" are hybrids).

Lemons (Eureka/Lisbon et al) are an ancient Citron X Lime hybrid

Limes (Mexican/Key/West Indian) are likely are Citron X Papeda hybrid. However the more common (in Australia) Tahitian lime is a Mexican lime X citron (or maybe lemon) hybrid.

Meyer Lemons are likely a sweet orange (also a hybrid) lemon cross. It was introduced from China in the early 20th century, which would make it older then many many heirloom fruit and veg. They are the most cold tolerant of them lemons, so most likely bets for the NZ climate.

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That's the most useful explanation of lemons and limes I think I've seen. Concise, clear. Thanks Adam.

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