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torsades au fromage


prasantrin
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I've recently discovered that torsades au fromage are very similar to some very special cheesesticks that were my favourites when I was a child. I want to try to replicate them, but I have a couple of questions.

Every recipe I've found (such as this one and this one) uses pâte feuilletée. From what I've read, this is puff pastry dough--is this correct?

If it's correct, could I use croissant dough instead of puff pastry dough? The bakery I buy "torsade a la tomate" from says they make theirs with croissant dough, not puff pastry, but I'm not sure if that's a translation error or if that's really the way they make them (Fauchon, but in Japan). Their torsades are the closest in texture to my beloved childhood cheesesticks, so if I can use croissant dough, I should. But pâte feuilletée would probably be easier for me to use, since I can buy some very good puff pastry dough, but not croissant dough. I also have a feeling I would really suck at making croissant dough, but I would definitely try it if it meant making really good cheesesticks.

Any helpful hints out there?

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I've recently discovered that torsades au fromage are very similar to some very special cheesesticks that were my favourites when I was a child.  I want to try to replicate them, but I have a couple of questions.

Every recipe I've found (such as this one and this one) uses pâte feuilletée.  From what I've read, this is puff pastry dough--is this correct? 

If it's correct, could I use croissant dough instead of puff pastry dough?  The bakery I buy "torsade a la tomate" from says they make theirs with croissant dough, not puff pastry, but I'm not sure if that's a translation error or if that's really the way they make them (Fauchon, but in Japan).  Their torsades are the closest in texture to my beloved childhood cheesesticks, so if I can use croissant dough, I should.  But pâte feuilletée would probably be easier for me to use, since I can buy some very good puff pastry dough, but not croissant dough.  I also have a feeling I would really suck at making croissant dough, but I would definitely try it if it meant making really good cheesesticks.

Any helpful hints out there?

I claim no particular wisdom on these, but my advice would be to stick to puff pastry.

Croissant dough tends to have a bit of sugar in it & the finished texture is different than that of puff pastry. Its more 'bread like' and less flaky.

I don't know where you are located, but in the states one used to be able to buy little part cooked croissants (they came in a little tube like container). If you could find them you could try making the cheese sticks with both types of dough and see which works best.

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I claim no particular wisdom on these, but my advice would be to stick to puff pastry.

Croissant dough tends to have a bit of sugar in it & the finished texture is different than that of puff pastry. Its more 'bread like' and less flaky.

I don't know where you are located, but in the states one used to be able to buy little part cooked croissants (they came in a little tube like container). If you could find them you could try making the cheese sticks with both types of dough and see which works best.

The cheesesticks of my childhood are actually a little more bread-like, but almost like uncooked bread in the middle. They weren't puffy like puff pastry, but they weren't flaky like a good croissant is. But I'll try the puff pastry dough first. I've got some in my freezer and I just need to get some good cheeses.

Do you mean Pillsbury Crescents? I don't think those are really croissant dough, but it might be worthwhile to try those, too. That experiment will have to wait until the next time I'm in Canada, though. I'm in Japan, and I've never seen them here!

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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pate feuillite is indeed puff pastry. I've done the cheese sticks with puff pastry, gruyere and mornay sauce, I'm not sure if these are the type if cheese sticks from your childhood, but I know there is puff pastry dough in just about every grocery stores freezer aisle in the US, those should work fine.

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