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A Patric

Turducken for Thanksgiving

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I got mine at the Cajun Butcher Block (pretty sure that's the name). I think they do mailorder.

I've ordered 2 from the Cajun Grocer and they were both surprisingly good and I was very pleased with the prompt delivery. They have several stuffing choices - I ordered the seafood jambalaya. Hope you have a lot of guests, because it is A LOT of food!

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We have purchased many items from Hebert's Specialty Meats and have been very happy. I have never mail ordered from them, but my sister did and she was pleased. My parents serve one of their turduckens every year at their Christmas party. http://www.hebertsmeats.com/


Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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Everything I know about Turducken could fit into, well, a very small bird. Actually everything I know about it comes from a rather hilarious essay by Jeffrey Steingarten in which he details his first attempt in a cramped NY kitchen. I don't remember if/what he may have said about the history. Is it a southern thing? Just curious--I'm not about to tackle it; I'm fine with one cavity and one bird. But it would be kind of amazing to see one served.

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I am most knowledgeable about the Hebert's version. More info here -

A Turducken is a delicately deboned turkey that is stuffed with boneless duck and chicken. A delicious cornbread dressing and pork stuffing is then added to separate each poultry. Special seasonings are sprinkled over and into the entire product. The Turducken is vacuum sealed forcing the seasonings into the product enhancing flavors and freshness. All you have to do is put it in the oven. You are sure to have a meal that will impress even the best gourmet.

The November 2005 issue of National Geographic magazine in an article by Calvin Trillin traced the American origins of the turducken to Maurice, Louisiana, and "Hebert's Specialty Meats", which has been making turduckens since 1985 when a local farmer whose name is lost to history brought in his own birds and asked Hebert's to prepare them in the now-familiar style. The company now sells around 3,300 turduckens a year. They share a friendly rivalry with Paul Prudhomme.

Mr Ed Richard (riee-chard) runs the shop here in Tulsa. His brother has Stinky's Fish Camp in Dune Allen Beach in south Walton county Florida. Both are really nice guys. I go there for my Poche's andouille and tasso for my pots of red beans and rice. If you have never served one then go for it. I remember the first time I prepared a boneless turkey for the family's thanksgiving. boy were they amazed.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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Thanks everyone!

No problem, not too many people make as good a chocolate bar as you do.


Edited by joiei (log)

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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IIRC, the Gourmet Butcher Block folks mentioned by TAPrice are related somehow to the original Hebert's Meat Market in Maurice, and also related to the Richards who produce turduckens in Tulsa. So if provenance matters to you, they're all part of the same branch of the turducken family tree.

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I'm probably closer to Iceland than Louisiana, but I can still get a turducken at my grocery store for around $75. This time of year there are a few giant boxes in the freezer -- they sit there like unclaimed luggage, and they'll be half price in a month if nobody claims them.

At the risk of sounding like a blasphemer, you could do a quick version with flattened breasts of chicken, turkey and duck. Layer them in wide pan with the appropriate supporting flavors -- looks like a bird lasagna. You don't get that whole creature inside a creature inside a creature thing, but it's fast.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Hickory Farms normally has them available, but it looks like they're out of stock:

"Tur-duc-ken

The name Tur-duc-ken may seem strange at first, but this turkey, duck and chicken dish is a flavor sensation! You'll find a deboned turkey except for the wings surrounding a partially deboned duck, surrounding a deboned chicken. In between each layer is a hearty Cajun spiced cornbread and pork rice stuffing! Big enough for a feast, it's a fantastic - and remembered - gift. 15 lbs. Serves 25-30.

GIFT# 64249 PRICE $120.00

This item is out of stock"

They are raw, and shipped to you frozen. We had one at a friends home this year, and it was very good.


Edited by Sam Iam (log)

Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

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I'm probably closer to Iceland than Louisiana, but I can still get a turducken at my grocery store for around $75. This time of year there are a few giant boxes in the freezer -- they sit there like unclaimed luggage, and they'll be half price in a month if nobody claims them.

At the risk of sounding like a blasphemer, you could do a quick version with flattened breasts of chicken, turkey and duck. Layer them in wide pan with the appropriate supporting flavors -- looks like a bird lasagna. You don't get that whole creature inside a creature inside a creature thing, but it's fast.

Cabela's sells a Quaducant.

"The Quaducant is a six-pound mixture of quail medallions, duck breast and Creole pork sausage, all stuffed inside a bare-boned pheasant."

Quadducant

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I'm probably closer to Iceland than Louisiana, but I can still get a turducken at my grocery store for around $75. This time of year there are a few giant boxes in the freezer -- they sit there like unclaimed luggage, and they'll be half price in a month if nobody claims them.

At the risk of sounding like a blasphemer, you could do a quick version with flattened breasts of chicken, turkey and duck. Layer them in wide pan with the appropriate supporting flavors -- looks like a bird lasagna. You don't get that whole creature inside a creature inside a creature thing, but it's fast.

Cabela's sells a Quaducant.

"The Quaducant is a six-pound mixture of quail medallions, duck breast and Creole pork sausage, all stuffed inside a bare-boned pheasant."

Quadducant

That sounds good, but this copied and pasted from Cabella's:

# Great for holidays and special occasions

# A six-pound mix of quail, duck and sausage

# Stuff insides a bare-boned pheasant

# Arrives frozen


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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