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Homemade Paillete Feuilletine

30 posts in this topic

Anyone happen to have a recipe and technique for making these tasty crunchy bits at home?

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Use corn flakes. Honest. You could also probably find a recipe for sugar cones and spread the batter really, really thin and cook them like crepes, cool and crush them. Corn flakes work pretty well, though:-)


Jenni

Pastry Methods and Techniques

Pastry Chef Online

"We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home."

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Corn flakes taste like corn flakes. Nothing wrong with that, but compared to feuilletine, they are very hard and coarse.

To the best of my knowledge, feulittine is made like a crepe batter.

The closest thing I can find to imitating it is "love letters". These are a pretty common Chinese snack/cookie. They are very thin, brittle crepe rolled up like "cigarettes" and invariably come in a tin. Meh, they're worth a shot.....

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and honestly, there's good feuilletine and bad feuilletine. i really like the barry/callebaut product and find other products to be inferior (coarser, not as nice tasting).

yeah, i wouldn't use corn flakes as a substitute...too different.

edited to add: if i wanted to find something tasty to use as a substitute and it didn't have to be exactly the same texture/flavor, i'd use caramelized rice crispies before i'd use cornflakes.


Edited by alanamoana (log)

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Over on the French Cuisine website boards (scroll down to the last post) someone posted this recipe:

48 oz Corn Flakes

18 oz Milk Chocolate

14 oz Praline Paste

S/He used it in the Culinary World Cup competition, so it must not be too far off from the real thing.

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Over on the French Cuisine website boards (scroll down to the last post) someone posted this recipe:
48 oz Corn Flakes

18 oz Milk Chocolate

14 oz Praline Paste

S/He used it in the Culinary World Cup competition, so it must not be too far off from the real thing.

Although the recipe you've listed may be tasty, Alana's right: Corn flakes are really different from feuilletine.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Cocoa Barry's website describes them as "flakes of Brittany Lace Crepes".

So find a Brittany Lace Crepe recipe and you're good to go.

I'm not entirely familiar with said Paillete Feuilletine. What is the application, mostly?

You can add it to chocolate or gianduja to give a nice crunchy textural element, plus it can add a bit of sweetness.


Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Cocoa Barry's website describes them as "flakes of Brittany Lace Crepes".

So find a Brittany Lace Crepe recipe and you're good to go.

I'm not entirely familiar with said Paillete Feuilletine. What is the application, mostly?

And it tends to stay crispy once in a centre (rather than go soggy)

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why can't you use ground up puff pastry?


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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why can't you use ground up puff pastry?

You can use what ever you want to use.

The cocoa-barry product is better (imho) because the crepes are sprayed with a light layer of cocoa butter before the crepes sheet go through the roller to break them up . This makes them tend to stay fresher longer longer and not sog up as fast.

Make no mistake though, feuilltine will sog up if it hits anything moist. If you mix it in with a nut paste or chocolate (both of which don't contain much water--if any) they'll stay crisp for a long time. If you use them to coat the side of a cake, they'll sog up fast.....

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Sounds about as easy as trying to make panko. Some things just need industrial machinery.

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perhaps find a wafer factory who doesn't have anything to do with all their "crumbs"? I think those cigar type wafers are very similar

Yes, that's what I said in my post above, chinese type "love letters" are a rolled type of cookie about the size of a cigarette.

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A not too sweet tuile batter might work. You could even brush them with cocoa butter before crushing.

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why can't you use ground up puff pastry?

maybe if you laminated your puff with sugar so that it caramelized (you'd get something closer, but still far away from the actual product)...otherwise, that's just crumbs. feuilletine is a very specific item.

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Cocoa Barry's website describes them as "flakes of Brittany Lace Crepes".

So find a Brittany Lace Crepe recipe and you're good to go.

I'm not entirely familiar with said Paillete Feuilletine. What is the application, mostly?

I've made a candy out of them, like almond rochers (rocks), and they're great. sort of like high end rice crispy treats (when made with white chocolate). also make them with milk and dark and other inclusions like toasted dessicated coconut, sliced toasted almonds, etc.

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Wow - I'm glad someone asked about making Paillete Feuilletine. I am aiming toward using only organic ingredients and thought I would have to give up making my 'hazelnut crisp' - basically what Ilana (Lior) described. I just did a search for recipes for crispy crepe, cornflakes, making Paillete Feuilletine, and wafer flakes and came up empty. I have tried a few brands of organic rice krispies and corn flakes - and yuck - they taste like cardboard. Anyone know of an organic source of Paillete Feuilletine?! How about an organic source of a TASTY corn flake or rice krispie??? Thanks!

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from what i understand, feuilletine is made from a very liquid crepe batter. usually, the batter is spread thinly on the back of sheet pans (heavy black steel sheet pans) and then when baked, scraped off and allowed to crumble.

i don't see why you can't adjust a crepe or tuile batter using organic ingredients to make your own. of course, the cost of labor and ingredients might just make your product a bit too expensive.

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Thanks - I think I'll give it a try and see how cost effective it is.

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Here's a link to someone making Crepes Dentelles

Crepes Dentelles

The end result of their recipe does not match the purchased paillete feulletine but I think the technique is sound...perhaps I'll try to work out a recipe too

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I've been dying to use my paillete feuilletine, i bought a box of it this summer, i wanted to add a different texture to some of my chocolates. I added it to praline cream from JP Wybauw Fine chocolates p86. This was probably not the ideal choice, the feuilletine ended up sort of soggy, not the crunchy i was looking for, though some people enjoyed the texture. I believe that the cream part of the recipe "wet" the feuilletine. Would it work better in a straight praline recipe?

What other use in chocolates have you tried with feuilletine?

Thanks for the input

Peter

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As mentioned in the posts above, you can use it in gianduja (low moisture) or straight chocolate, maybe with the addition of nust ect, in any other recipes that have moisture ( like cream etc ) the paillette will sog.


Vanessa

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