Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
marypoppins

École Internationale de Pâtisserie vs. Ferrandi

Recommended Posts

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello All,

I am a pastry chef...a very new one and have been very fortunate to get a job in London without any prior experience. However I want to expand my horizons and persue my passion by taking it to the next level. I want to get a formal qualification in pastry in either France, Germany or Austria.

I hope to do this in next summer'09 and so trying to gather as much information and feed back..as I want to make the right choice...n for once in my life not act on impulse

Anyways...I've been doing a lot of research and quite a bit has been revealed to me:

1. Disappointing though..but it seems Le cordon bleu has had some ratehr negative feedback. A lotta drop outs, Bad Admin, finishing school, 70 students in one class, bla bla bla...n the list goes on. So i think tht's pretty much out for me.

2. I've short listed a few other schools in France:

* Oliver Bajard's École Internationale de Pâtisserie : It seems to be totally focused on pastry and apparently the classes are taught by well known chefs rather than teachers.

Its a 20 week course for 16,000 euro and then you have the option for staying in france for 6 months to gain some proffessional training by working in the industry there.

*ESCF Ferrandi : Its also the same duration and almost the same price. Its not so specialized as it also does french cruisine. But has a lot of name in France.

*Lenotre: Suppose to be excellent but very pricey for just a few weeks and one needs to have a lotta prior knowledge and experience

(ANY OTHER RECOMMENDATION,NAMES OF INSTITUTES WOULD BE WELCOME)

Amongst these 3 I am leaning a little towards Oliver Bajard...has anyone been there or heard of it...I would really appreciate it. Is it easy to get a job after coming out of there?

Also is it absolutely vital to study french for going to study in france....or just a little learning of kitchen french for a month or so would suffice?

3. A cafe owner in norway or was it sweden...told me about this institute in Germany: sweet art. Anyone heard of it? Or any other proffessional pastry institute there?

So these are my options...that I've short listed...I would really appreciate any postive comments, feed back. My motive in the end is to open my cafe but before that i want to explore working in exciting places.

I look foward to hearing from you.

Thank you for your time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hello marypoppins,

i'm currently in the cuisine course at Ferrandi and I can tell you that the pastry one is very good. The anglophone class is taught by chef Didier Averty. he is very knowledgeable, excited about his work and a funny guy too.

The pastry class gets work in all areas of traditional french pastry, bread baking classes (weekly i think), some butchery classes, art classes to design pastry and cakes as well as kitchen design to design your own pastry shop, wine classes exploring mainly dessert wines and the pairing of wine and desserts, french as a second language classes twice a week.

There is also an optional stage, I believe up to 6 months, at some of the best pastry shops or restaurants in france available at the end of your schooling at Ferrandi. Not to mention that Pierre Herme also has his atelier at the school and offers extra courses for Ferrandi students to take.

hope this helps, if you have any questions just let me know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hello marypoppins,

i'm currently in the cuisine course at Ferrandi and I can tell you that the pastry one is very good. The anglophone class is taught by chef Didier Averty. he is very knowledgeable, excited about his work and a funny guy too.

The pastry class gets work in all areas of traditional french pastry, bread baking classes (weekly i think), some butchery classes, art classes to design pastry and cakes as well as kitchen design to design your own pastry shop, wine classes exploring mainly dessert wines and the pairing of wine and desserts, french as a second language classes twice a week.

There is also an optional stage, I believe up to 6 months, at some of the best pastry shops or restaurants in france available at the end of your schooling at Ferrandi. Not to mention that Pierre Herme also has his atelier at the school and offers extra courses for Ferrandi students to take.

hope this helps, if you have any questions just let me know!

Thank you Le peche for getting back to me about Ferrandi...I know the school is excellents...but I just want to compare it with École Internationale de Pâtisserie which specializes in patisserie only. I was just wondering if anyone has heard of it...it's a school by oliver bajard.

I am in such a deliemma... :(

thanks again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
École Internationale de Pâtisserie  which specializes in patisserie only. I was just wondering if anyone has heard of it...it's a school by oliver bajard.

If you do a search for it you'll find it here.
(ANY OTHER RECOMMENDATION,NAMES OF INSTITUTES WOULD BE WELCOME)

If you do a search of pastry/patisserie cooking classes I'll think you'll find all the suggestions and comparions you need.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By kostbill
      Hello.
      I would like to buy some pectinex ultra sp-l.
      However I am worried about the temperature during the shipping time.
      I read that the storage temperature should be between 2 and 8 C. It works best from 15 to 50 C, and if it stays a lot of time in 25 C, it will gradually be deactivated.
       
      It needs a week to come here (Greece), then will it affect its abilities?
       
      Do you know if I can find a document somewhere that explains the gradual loss of power as a function of time and temperature?
      Did you have any experience with pectinex not working well due to bad storage?
       
      Thanks.
    • By apilinariosilvia
      Can anyone give me idea how to make homemade french bread in wood fired oven?
    • By Galchic
      Hello, folks, thanks for reading.
       
      My husband thinks, I should start selling my popcorn seasonings (which I make for my family), it’s a good product. But I'm not sure if it’s interesting to other people... So, what do you think, guys?
       
      Our story: 
      We’ve bought an air popper machine, but popcorn came out pretty tasteless. Then, we’ve bought different “popcorn seasoning” mixes... But it always ends with all the seasoning at the bottom of the bowl. Then, we've added butter, oil and so on before seasoning...  we got soggy, chewy popcorn. Lot’s of disappointments…
       
      When we almost gave up… the magic happened! I figured out the way to make seasonings that:
      Stick to popcorn, but not sticky to fingers (or T-shirt  , Easy to apply, May be pre cooked in bulk and stored… And popcorn appears crunchy, tasty, thoroughly covered with seasoning.  
      Sounds good, yep? Now, when I want to treat myself  - I only need 2 mins to turn tasteless popped popcorn to a real treat.  
      The only moment - it request 1 extra effort: after you toss it over popcorn, you need to microwave it for 1 min, and stir after.
       
      So, I was wondering, if you like popcorn like myself - would this seasoning be interesting for you to purchase? Are you ready for a little extra work (microwave & stir) in the goal to flavor popcorn, or it feels too much effort?
       
      As I have no experience in manufacturing and retail, your answers would help me to make a very important decision - to dive in or not... 
       
      Thanks in advance for your answers, it means the world to me.
       
    • By pastrygirl
      There are two local grocery stores here who I'd like to try to sell chocolate to but they have policies forbidding GMO soy,  Soy lecithin is allowed only if organic or certified non-GMO. 
       
      I use a lot of Felchlin, some Valrhona, a little Cacao Barry. The only mention of GMOs I've found from Felchlin is this note in a brochure: GMO absence:  Felchlin fulfills current legislative requirements regarding GMO absence.  All Felchlin products comply with the Swiss Regulation and the European Council Regulation related to genetically modified organisms in food and feed.
       
      Does anybody know what those requirements are?  Is anything European going to be GMO-free?  Or labeled above some %?
       
       
    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...