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Magnetism In The Kitchen


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In a recent topic discussing knife storage there was a mention of magnetic knife racks magnetizing the knives, and what effect this might have, if any, on performance. I can't imagine it would affect even the highest of iron-rich foods. Or would it?

Naturally, I started to think about all the magnets in my kitchen. They're everywhere -- on the knife rack, on the can opener, holding cabinet doors snugly shut, inside every appliance motor, and the sealing strip on my fridge doors. If I had a magnetic induction stove element there'd be magnetism at work there too. I have a hotplate with a built-in spinning magnet -- you drop the tiny white hotdog-shaped stirrer in and it mixes your stuff.

So what is magnetism doing in your kitchen? I'm positive there are culinary processes unknown to me that utilize magnetism .

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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In another topic I posted how hubby reclaimed rare earth magnets from old disk drives and they now hold many of my utensils on the side of my fridge! These magnets are incredibly strong and can hold some hefty utensils with no difficulty.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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This is kinda sorta off topic, but I store a timer with a magnet on it in a box with an instant read thermometer -- is that stupid?

This reminds me of Errol Morris' movie about Steven Hawking -- there's a falling teacup in it, and the teacup figures into the "plot", at least the plot of Steven Hawking's mind . . .

Kind of makes you think of the kitchen as a mystical place with a force field in it, which it is.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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I use my sample Wine Clip to keep notes stuck to the refrigerator...

ahem. :raz:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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. . . . Kind of makes you think of the kitchen as a mystical place with a force field in it, which it is.
Agreed.

I'm still wondering if magnetism is used in any way to prepare, cook or otherwise manipulate food. Surely somewhere someone (who probably cooks wearing a lab coat) has tried to levitate an appetizer or something.

My curiosity has been triggered, I think, by a colleague who has designed a roof for a hockey rink. This building features an exposed metal roof structure with a thin weatherproof membrane attached to the underside with magnets. Unorthodox, yes, but clever because the roof membrane is continuous without penetrations i.e. not leaky.

My point is . . . I'm amazed when a strange solution is successful.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I'm still wondering if magnetism is used in any way to prepare, cook or otherwise manipulate food.

I still think that a laboratory hot plate with magnetic stir bar would be quite useful in the kitchen.

Bruce, it really is IMO another kitchen gadget with GeorgeForemanGrill or ThighMaster potential. It's been discussed in an eG forum, I recall a Society member from the University of Michigan who uses one -- Ann, maybe?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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. . . . Kind of makes you think of the kitchen as a mystical place with a force field in it, which it is.
Agreed.

I'm still wondering if magnetism is used in any way to prepare, cook or otherwise manipulate food. Surely somewhere someone (who probably cooks wearing a lab coat) has tried to levitate an appetizer or something.

My curiosity has been triggered, I think, by a colleague who has designed a roof for a hockey rink. This building features an exposed metal roof structure with a thin weatherproof membrane attached to the underside with magnets. Unorthodox, yes, but clever because the roof membrane is continuous without penetrations i.e. not leaky.

My point is . . . I'm amazed when a strange solution is successful.

I believe that induction cooktops are based on magnetism.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I believe that induction cooktops are based on magnetism.

Bah, beat me to it. Yes, induction cooktops use magnetism, and I also happen to love using induction cooktops. They're precise, heat up very quick, they don't heat up the whole kitchen, and you don't need a gas hookup :biggrin:

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Would a hotplate with stirrer be powerful enough to stir a risotto or would that be too thick?

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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Would a hotplate with stirrer be powerful enough to stir a risotto or would that be too thick?

Mine would not -- but the one who perfects a risotto machine might retire early.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Mine would not -- but the one who perfects a risotto machine might retire early.

Risotto machine? All you need is a cross between a thermomix and a KitchenAid-type mixer. But that wouldn't be much fun, some things are better done the old fashioned way (I still prefer kneading bread by hand).

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Mine would not -- but the one who perfects a risotto machine might retire early.

Risotto machine? All you need is a cross between a thermomix and a KitchenAid-type mixer. But that wouldn't be much fun, some things are better done the old fashioned way (I still prefer kneading bread by hand).

If I had a risotto machine I'd use it as much as my bread machine -- which is never. The delicate part of risotto (and ice cream) is the finishing. Knowing when to stop is hard for a machine. But it would have magnets inside!

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Mine would not -- but the one who perfects a risotto machine might retire early.

Risotto machine? All you need is a cross between a thermomix and a KitchenAid-type mixer. But that wouldn't be much fun, some things are better done the old fashioned way (I still prefer kneading bread by hand).

No, just a thermomix will make a good risotto when your in a hurry so long as you monitor the last few minutes, but for a perfect risotto by hand is still best

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

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Now I'm picturing a robotic arm that will accept a variety of implements that pushes back up into the hood of your stove when not in use.

When you need it, you pull it down, shove and implement in the business end and set it.

It stirs while you do other things.

I once went to Halloween as the Jetson's maid.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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