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Wybauw's ganache trays


purple-klick
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I've use JPW's books, looked at the pictures on eGullet from his workshops (wow!) and watched videos on the Callebaut site. Where o where does one find the ganache trays with fitted bars that he uses? Are they available for retail purchase? Those of you who've used them: what do think about them?

Thanks.

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Tomric has metal frames and bars you could put in them. They don't have the shallow trays that he uses however. With the frames you can put a guitar sheet under it. You can even put the foot of tempered chocolate on the guitar sheet before pouring the ganache on it, saves you a step later on.

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Hot tip, Kerry! Thanks!

If I understand what you're saying, the layers (from the top down) would be like this:

ganache poured over

chocolate foot spread inside frame on

plastic guitar sheet set on

sheet pan

Is this so?

Yup

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Hot tip, Kerry! Thanks!

If I understand what you're saying, the layers (from the top down) would be like this:

ganache poured over

chocolate foot spread inside frame on

plastic guitar sheet set on

sheet pan

Is this so?

Yup

Kerry, do you really put down the foot before pouring the ganache or am I reading this wrong?

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Stop for a moment and think.

Metal bars are metal bars are metal bars

Go to a metal shop or a welder's and get some 3/8" x 3/8" square 18/10 S/S bars ( or alum., if you prefer...) bars cut up in 12" or 24" lengths

Believe you me, they'll be a whole lot cheaper than going through any distributer.

Guitar sheets are cheap, but I'm even cheaper.....

Line a tray with cling film or parchement and place your bars on top, pour in your ganache, and let harden.

Remove the bars, invert the tray, peel off the cling film or parchment, and brush on your couveture.

(I use a silicone brush, very easy to clean: Swish the brush around in your couveture untill it's fully loaded, and then set the brush down on your counter and let harden. When hardened you can pull the brush right out of the couveture--clean as a whistel, scrape off the couveure hunk, and re-melt it. Oh, and you never loose brush hairs ...)

Well?!! I told you I was cheap--and cunning.....

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Hot tip, Kerry! Thanks!

If I understand what you're saying, the layers (from the top down) would be like this:

ganache poured over

chocolate foot spread inside frame on

plastic guitar sheet set on

sheet pan

Is this so?

Yup

Kerry, do you really put down the foot before pouring the ganache or am I reading this wrong?

Yes, it can be done. It's not the way I usually do it (because I always forget!), but I know folks who do it this way consistently.

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I get them online at papermart. Let me look up the exact item number for you tomm. I always put a thin layer as a foot down before I pour in my ganache. You can apply a thin layer with an offset spatula, or better yet go to an art supply store and get a roller that is used to lay down ink, it works well.

As far as the metal, I went that route, but never much cared for it. I use acrylic boards and acrylic bars. My boards are 3/8 inch thick, and 18x26, then I have acrylic bars with different thickness (1/2 inch height, 1/4 inch height etc) each about an inch wide. I can do side by side 2 different ganaches per board. You can also get them made out of the same plastic that is used for molds, but it costs more.

The way I use it, I get a towel and wet it and and put a thin layer of water down on the acrylic board, then I put the plastic sheet down and smooth out all the wrinkles with a dry towel. The water makes the plastic sheet stick to the board so it won't come up. Then I put a thin layer of chocolate down on the plastic sheet (the foot), once that is spread out, I lay down the bars, to make 2 frames, once the chocolate sets, you have a foot and it also hardens under the bars so they don't move either. Then make your ganache as usual and pour into the frames, I use a raplette to even it out, let it dry overnight and your in business.

Luis

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I actually have acrylic frames that I had made. Same as the acrylic frames that you see in the Tomric catalogue (except mine are clear). You can lay down your first layer, smooth it with a chamfered piece of acrylic, then when you are ready for a second layer, just glue another frame down to the first with a bit of chocolate and you are ready to go.

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lovely ideas! WOuld it be a hassle to take a photo of the raplette and set up, Luis?

And Kerry, is the chamfered acryllic like a spatula or something like an offset one??

Thanks!

It's a rectangle of acrylic as long as the frame is wide and about 3 " wide. The chamfer is along one long edge. I just hold it in the middle or on both ends and drag it. Here is picture of the one I copied.

gallery_34671_3115_14363.jpg

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Thanks!! A chamfer is just a smooth surface? Like in the picture - on the top of the acrylic rectangle- a centimeter of so in width? I am wondering because I had one similar made of stainless steel. If I want to make a thin sheet of chocolate and put a transfer sheet or an acrylic sheet on the top to make it shiny, in order to paint on or write on, or cut into smaller squares (chocolate paper), would this work to make it even? When I did it Ihad small shallow "valleys" her and there, in the middle parts of the sheet, so the acryllic or guitar sheet didn't touch these areas, and so the shine was lost here and there. If it were a transfer sheet, the design wouldn't have come out on these areas.

You are very kind to post a picture- thanks!

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I'm not very good at explaining today. A chamfered edge is cut diagonally. So the little piece of acrylic he is using to smooth out the top of the ganache has a diagonal cut edge to do a better job of the smoothing. I suspect that even if it was just cut square it would work fine. You can't actually see the chamfered edge in the picture, it is at the bottom of the leveling piece.

If you had a thin frame cut, then you could probably make an even thin piece of chocolate.

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I understand now- thanks! Too bad I didn't know that before!! I guess for a sheet of chocolate the frame would have to be 2mm or so. Nice idea. I will have to see where I can get it made and who makes acryllic things around here...

Some site here said to make a thin layer of chocolate on a guitar sheet, cover it with another guitar sheet and then use a soft roller pin (??) to get an even layer. Soft roller pin??

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I understand now- thanks! Too bad I didn't know that before!! I guess for a sheet of chocolate the frame would have to be 2mm or so. Nice idea. I will have to see where I can get it made and who makes acryllic things around here...

Some site here said to make a thin layer of chocolate on a guitar sheet, cover it with another guitar sheet and then use a soft roller pin (??) to get an even layer. Soft roller pin??

I'm thinking what ever rolling pin you have should work. I've got a silicone one which would be 'soft' compared to the stainless and wooden ones I have.

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aaah! Wow a silicone rollING pin! I will try this with my wooden one.  I thought there was rolling pin kind of like the ones used to paint walls!! I think a regular one may work.

I guess you could use a sponge paint roller. Some people use them to put the foot on the slab.

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Kerry beat me to the pic, but you get the general idea.

Kerry, is that frame solid? I use acrylic bars that aren't attached, so I can make various sized slabs.

I don't have any pic currently, but I can take some next time I make ganache.

Luis

Yup, just cut out of a large piece of acrylic. So not cheap, but not as expensive as buying them ready made. I have some pieces I can put in the middle for smaller batches.

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