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Nougat Caramels


Badiane
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I want to make some caramels with a layer of nougat, like this picture

http://www.sanderscandy.com/images/22986.jpg

or with a swirl, like this picture

http://www.floridanutsaboutcandy.com/Produ...ugatswirltn.jpg

Does anyone have any idea how to make the white stuff? I imagine it as some kind of basic nougat. Memories of the storebought candy has it as a slightly gelatinous concoction. I'm open to any and all ideas.

Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

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I want to make some caramels with a layer of nougat, like this picture

http://www.sanderscandy.com/images/22986.jpg

or with a swirl, like this picture

http://www.floridanutsaboutcandy.com/Produ...ugatswirltn.jpg

Does anyone have any idea how to make the white stuff?  I imagine it as some kind of basic nougat.  Memories of the storebought candy has it as a slightly gelatinous concoction.  I'm open to any and all ideas.

Nougat, or Italian nougat is a bit tricky when making the first time

With no apologies, I have taken the recipie from Grewlings "Chocoaltes and confections" and used it for one of my "standard" varieties

Don't have the recipie with me now, but it goes something like this:

Whip eggwhites and then on slow, pour in hot honey (120 C if memory serves me correctly)

Whip until stiff

Pour in a suar/water/glucose mixture that has been heated to 155 C

Whip until cold

Whip in some cocoa butter

fold in your nut/fruit mixture

spread out on rice paper and press with weights

rest overnight

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Thanks...

I have ordered the book - 3 bucks at ABEbooks!

I am trying the nougat recipe

I don't need to roll, that's what the husband is for :laugh:

And someone PM'd me and said they were sending some info...I tried to message back but the system wouldn't let me...but I can't wait to see what you have!!

Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

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Hi Badiane

I tried emailing you. I will look tonight and get the nougat recipes, and the French Nougat recipes and post them here for you. I can also post the caramel. I have the original formulas from my family's business and will gladly share them with you. None of us are going to pursue the confections business the way our grandparents and uncles and aunts did.

We have just moved to Arizona, and I got distracted with "stuff". I will get on this tonight!

Annette

www.chocolatesandthings.blogspot.com

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French Nougat

Place the whites of six eggs in a pan and beat until stiff and frothy. Now, place in another kettle, two pounds granulated white sugar, one and a half pounds corn syrup and one pint of water. Place on stove and dissolve well by stirring. Boil to about 252 degrees and pour half of the syrup over the egg whites, while someone stirs them vigorously. Boil the other half of the syrup up to 260 degrees and pour over the eggs as you did the first, then place kettle on box and beat or cream vigorously, add almonds and flavor with vanilla. Pour batch out in wafer lined trays and allow to set overnight.

You can also work in two ounces of candied cherries, quart pound of walnuts, candied or glaced pineapple.

The following is from Ragsdale's Candy Manufacturing out of East Orange, New Jersey. Mr. Ragsdale taught tons of people in the early 1900's the trade of candymaking. My distant relatives are among them.

I don't think that the caramel recipes will be much help. They have a few things that will have to be substituted, since we don't use the same things now.

Here are several "caramels" recipes.

French Caramels

Place two pounds white sugar, two pounds corn syrup, one and one half pints of fresh light cream and one pint condensed milk in a clean kettle. Place on stove and stir constantly to prevent scorching. Cook up to the "stiff ball" degree and your thermometer should register about the 246 degrees. Remove kettle from fire and add two ounces of finely shaved paraffine substitute. Flavor with two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. Stir well and then pour the hot candy out on a cold greased slab between steel bars. When entirely cold, cut up in desired sizes.

Superfine Caramels

Place two pounds sugar, one and three-quarters pound corn syrup, one-half pint fresh dairy cream, one-half pint evaporated mild and one ounce confectioners hard nut butter (Naco #90) in a clean kettle. Stir constantly and boil to 236 degrees, then add four ounces best butter and cook to 244 degrees or the "stiff ball" stage. Remove from fire, flavor with one tablespoonful vanilla and pour on cold greased slab between steel bars. When cool, cut in usual way, wrap in waxed paper.

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Great care should be exercised in boiling syrup for caramels as you do not want them to be too hard. When properly made, caramels will be soft and have a nice "chew". When they are very hard and brittle, it is an indication that the syrup has been boiled too long. The batch should be stirred constantly to prevent scorching. Always use the best sweet cream. You can start the boiling on a good brisk fire, but you should slow it down as the batch gets done. Chocolate Caramels may be made by adding six to eight ounces of grated bitter chocolate after the batch is off the fire. Nut Caramels are made by adding chopped walnuts, almonds or pecans. Add nuts by stirring in after removing kettle from fire. Flavor with vanilla to taste.

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