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Herbal Teas/Tisanes - what are your favorites?


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A very nice tea the last 2 days, soothing to my irritated throat during a cold: korean hydrangea leaf (gamro), chamomile, tulsi, hibiscus, lemongrass--the chamomile gives a nice base, hydrangea adds sweetness, tulsi (holy basil) adds spice, and the hibiscus and lemongrass give it a nice fruitiness. Yum.

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  • 4 months later...

Richard asked me to post this recipe here. This is traditional Lojano Horchata, a 42-herb blended tisane that's usually served iced. I mix up a big jar and just dump 2-3 tablespoons in my diffuser pot, and drink it hot (scandal!)

1. Ataco (Amaranthus muricantus) - 1 TSP

2. Dried bracts of purple or red Bougainvillea - 1 TSP

3. Dried petals of red Hibiscus - 1 TSP

4. Dried petals of Rosa rugosa or similar aromatic rose - 1 TBSP

5. Dried flowers of Marigold (Tagetes spp) - 1 TBSP or 1 flower, if you dried them whole

6. Malva olorosa (Marshmallow) - 1 TSP; I like the dried flowers, but others swear by the leaves.

7. Toronjil (Melissa officianalis) - 1 TBSP

8. Basil - 1 TSP

9. Horsetail (dried frondlets) - 1 TSP

10. Chamomile - 1 TBSP; I like the dried flowers, but whole-herb is good too

11. Hierba Luisa (Lemongrass) - 7-8 long blades or 1 TBSP of dried

12. Mint - 1 TBSP

13. Peperomia congona - 1 TSP

14. Blackberry leaf - 1 TSP (Raspberry may be substituted; they have the same properties.)

15. Cedron (Aloysia triphylla) - 1 TBSP

16. Lantana camara - 1 TBSP; I prefer a mix of leaves and flowers

17. Matico (Piper anduncum) - 1 TBSP; leaves

18. Mariapanga (Piper peltatum) - 1 TSP; leaves

19. Ishpingo (Cinnamon flower) - 1, crushed

20. Passionflower (P. ligularis) - up to 2 dried crushed flowers

21. Arrayan (a true myrtle) - 1 TSP; leaves are best, but berries are great when you can find them.

22. Hierba Buena (Lemon Verbena) - 1 TBSP

23. Hoja Dulce (Stevia) - 1 TBSP

24. Paico (Epazote) - 1 TSP

25. Senna glandulosa - 1 TSP

26. Boldo - 2 TSP

27. Ilex guayusa - 1 TBSP

28. Flor Blanca - 1 TSP

29. Sanguarachi (Amranthus cruentus) - 1 TSP (leaves)

30. Rosemary - 1 TSP

31. Oregano - 1 TSP

32. Vervena - 1 TSP

33. Valerian root - 1/2 TSP

34. St. John's Wort flower - 1 TSP

35. Calendula oficianale flowers - 1 TBSP

36. Berries from Fuchsia dependens - 2 or 3, dried and powdered

37. Mortiño berries - 3-4, dried and powdered

38. Joyapa berries - 2-3, dried and powdered

39. Achupalla flowers - 1 TSP

40. Cat's claw bark - 1 TSP

41. Poma Rosa leaves - 1 TSP

42. Chrysanthemum flowers - 1

ETA - Ingredients 1-32 or so are considered the canonical root of the tisane and aren't changed from province to province. Further north in the highlands, dried spices (cinnamon, gingerroot, cardamom) start to replace the paramo berries.

Edited by Panaderia Canadiense (log)
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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Wow, that's a lot of quite distinct herbs etc in one drink. Sounds very complex. I've only heard of about half of those. I like to vary my herbal tisanes based on whim or mood,'from spicy to minty to tart, but hardly ever use more than 5'or 6 ingredients at a time.

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I have a bougainvillea in my yard: it's Tisane talent comes as quite a surprise. For me it's mostly a nuisance plant needing a lot of trimming and getting it's throne between me and the figs above it. What flavor or property does it add to the tea?

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The whole point of Horchata is that it's not only quite tasty (and each person blends it differently, so it's quite distinct between families) it's also very good for whatever ails you. In Loja, the saying is that with a cup of Horchata each day, you can live past 100.

Apart from the canonical 32, I vary the ingredients in Horchata as well - now that I live at 10,000 feet, I find myself including Coca Leaf in place of Fuchsia more often than not (it's extremely useful for altitude-related troubles), and I have a friend who uses wild violet flowers in place of Calendula (I'm not sure I like it as much with the violets - they're very bitter.)

ETA - Bougainvillea is a strong vermifuge and liver tonic; the purple bracts also add a nice pinkish colour to the final brew.

Edited by Panaderia Canadiense (log)

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Where do you get your stevia? I can only find powder and extracts, which I honestly think taste too much like their artificial counterparts (terrible). I haven't spent any time looking, but have been wanting to find a source for fresh or dried stevia to play with...

Your mix sounds really good. Does the basil not make the brew bitter?

At a herb class this summer I had and then started making at home a mix of lemon balm, mint, lemon basil and stevia.  Very nice.

If the Stevia is making your tea taste metallic and artificially sweetened, you've used water that was too hot to steep it. Like Yerba Mate, boiling water bruises Stevia and causes the release of some rather unpleasantly flavoured bitter alkaloids. Try using water that's hot but not boiling next time, and you'll find that the bitter metallic taste disappears.

Depending on where you are, you shoud be able to find live plants at specialty nurseries - it's becoming a popular landscaping shrub in the US. If not, I can certainly send you dried leaves.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...

Where do you get your stevia? I can only find powder and extracts, which I honestly think taste too much like their artificial counterparts (terrible). I haven't spent any time looking, but have been wanting to find a source for fresh or dried stevia to play with...

Your mix sounds really good. Does the basil not make the brew bitter?

Nature's Tea Leaf is located in the U.S. and carries organic dried steavia leaf. Also, the herbal tea (tisane) selection is pretty large. You can find everything from red clover to uncut hibiscus to moringa. 

Your One Stop Shop For Everything Organic and Natural TEA!

Discover Tea Health Benifits, Promote Weight Loss, Enjoy Free Samples and Unbeatable Deals, and So, So Much More!

Visit us at http://www.NaturesTeaLeaf.com OR Call Toll Free For The Best Customer Service In The Industy 1-(800)-TEA-9895. 

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  • 5 years later...

Fruit Tea and Vegetable Tea

...............................................


I wonder if anyone on this thread likes Fruit Teas or Vegetable Tea? 

I like boiling my tea and then straining it with an old fashioned tea strainer, rather than steeping the tea. 
Strawberry tea: 

 

3 cups water

6 to 8 ripe strawberries

1/4 teaspoon strawberry or cherry jam or preserve. 
 

In a pan, boil water and add strawberry slices. Stir as it boils to break up the fruit and let it cook. When the fruit looks soft, turn off the heat. Mix the jam or fruit preserve. 
You can strain this tea if you want it completely pulp free. Otherwise, I like to even have all the fruit. I have pictures of today’s strawberry tea. 
I will take better pictures next time so the colors can be seen.
When I make vegetable tea, I strain the vegetables. 
 

Ginger Tea

 

3 cups water

Big slices of about a 2 inch piece of fresh ginger

Honey or splenda

1/8 t spoon ghee (optional)

1/8 t spoon turmeric pwd (optional)

 

Boil water and add the ginger, ghee and turmeric powder. Keep boiling till the water reduces to two cups. Strain with a strainer. Add splenda or honey to taste. 
 

Fresh Turmeric tea

 

3 cups water

Big slices of Fresh turmeric about 1/2 inch

(a little goes a long way)

4 seeds from a small cardamom pod

1/8 tsp ghee(optional)

milk (optional)

splenda or honey

 

Boil water and add all the ingredients. Keep reducing till it is less than 2 cups. Strain and add splenda or honey.

 

Ginger tea or Turmeric tea are both excellent night time drinks. Or great for a ticklish throat. 
Would anyone like to try these? Or more? 
 

Bhukkhad

 

 

 

 

097053BB-764B-4E24-B904-AB7A80511B78.jpeg

AF97CA0B-3CD4-48B5-9EB4-8E7F90B062DE.jpeg

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@Bhukhhad  Yes I like ginger, hibiscus (we call it jamaica), and citrus blossom which I pick fresh from trees. I do a light simmer and then strain. The first time I gave a friend fresh citrus flowers she texted me when she got home and said it was an amazing experience. There was a trend here with infused waters. They sold special drink bottles with an insert. I prefer what a bit of heat releases in terms of aroma and flavor. Turmeric drinks trended here a while back. I think the most marketed name was Golden Milk tea. Heidi Swanson's recipe  https://www.101cookbooks.com/turmeric-tea/ I like it but have not had it with the fresh root which is all around me but I am not good with laundry - I got up one morning to an explosion of color in the kitchen as it had been grated by an ambitious health nut the night before.

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

@Bhukhhad  Yes I like ginger, hibiscus (we call it jamaica), and citrus blossom which I pick fresh from trees. I do a light simmer and then strain. The first time I gave a friend fresh citrus flowers she texted me when she got home and said it was an amazing experience. There was a trend here with infused waters. They sold special drink bottles with an insert. I prefer what a bit of heat releases in terms of aroma and flavor. Turmeric drinks trended here a while back. I think the most marketed name was Golden Milk tea. Heidi Swanson's recipe  https://www.101cookbooks.com/turmeric-tea/ I like it but have not had it with the fresh root which is all around me but I am not good with laundry - I got up one morning to an explosion of color in the kitchen as it had been grated by an ambitious health nut the night before.

Wow Heidih

I looked at the Swanson recipe. That is a LOT of turmeric. I would find it bitter at that amount. Generally in India, we use turmeric powder in everything almost, but never this generously. 
Oh well as long as the person likes it.

Bhukkhad

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Well she is using just a bit of the paste diluted with a cup of water. I think she did it as a paste so one could prep ahead and use for a number of times.

Edited by heidih (log)
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I enjoy a cup of herbal tea every evening before bed. I've always bought pre-made blends. Yogi has had a couple that were great. BUT, every time I find one I love, it seems to get discontinued. This thread has inspired me to try making my own blends. Thank you all for sharing what you make.

Deb

Liberty, MO

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I drink herbal tea all day at work, so for convenience I am using prepackaged bags from Celestial Seasonings, Yogi, etc. I will brew ginger tea as posted above when I am home with a cold. My current rotation from Celestial is Vanilla Spice and Apple Cinnamon (everyone near my office comments how they crave apple pie when I have this). From Yogi tea I am enjoying ginger mango. In the summer I will be more likely to lean towards less cinnamon...ginger/lemon, peach, etc. 

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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I;d forgotten about Good Earth. (it was a restaurant chain long ago) I grew up with the spicy comforting tea in the late 70's.  Forget dessert - just drink the tea. Excellent when you have a cold.  https://www.vitacost.com/good-earth-organic-herbal-tea-caffeine-free-sweet-spicy?

Edited by heidih (log)
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Yes, I too liked Good Earth...both the restaurant and the tea. Thanks for the link to that tea.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'm a big fan of Yogi teas. I like their night time teas and their digestive teas (they make a number of different ones. I do think herbal teas, no matter the brand really, do work and can at least help you feel better. I like the lemon ginger teas when I have a cold. If you can get your hands on, or make, Korean Saenggang Cha (ginger/honey tea), when you've got a cold, that's the best! It often comes in a jar and has texture like a jam or marmalade. You just get a spoonful or so, and pour boiling water over it. It's delicious and does help clear your head when it's stuffed up. 

I'm not a big fan of plain old water, so often find myself drinking different herbal teas throughout the day instead and at night too. I don't mind if they get cold. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, acookinthecreuse said:

 If you can get your hands on, or make, Korean Saenggang Cha (ginger/honey tea), when you've got a cold, that's the best! It often comes in a jar and has texture like a jam or marmalade. You just get a spoonful or so, and pour boiling water over it. I

 

Along the same lines I like the Korean citron tea. I didn't know what it was when I bought it - I liked the look of it. A nice change of pace although I have lots of citrus so have been making a home version. Numerous Korean markets here.

https://mykoreankitchen.com/yuja-tea-korean-citron-tea/

Edited by heidih (log)
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Introduced to this simple infusion at dinner in a French home, it has become my husband's staple contribution to dinner parties.    For me, it is a god-send as I used to ask for after dinner requests and then stagger into the kitchen trying to remember much less conger up 2 espresso, 1 decaf, 1 herb tea, 1 black tea...   Now he proudly presents

 

Mint tea

 

1 large tea pot, 1 handful fresh mint, boiling water.  

 

Sublime.

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eGullet member #80.

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