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Richard Kilgore

Let's See Your Teaware!

175 posts in this topic

Here are a few of the tea "appliances" I have.

The first two are Teasmade, made by Goblin in the UK and I have had them converted to US electric current.

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I have three more but no photos right now.

They are interesting items. The Teasmade web site. Lots of people collect them.

The Phillips was only available in the US for a very short time in the mid '80s.

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The last appliance has multiple holders for "herbal" tea blends or for blending regular teas.

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I also have some other tea brewing appliances. A TeaMate that was marketed in the US by Chefs Choice for a couple of years about 8 years ago.

One of the Sunbeam tea brewers that has never been out of the box.

And a weird "machine" that looks like it was invented by Rube Goldberg. It packed away now but has components that resemble the glass coffee siphon machines but with a laboratory timer wired into the works. I do have some photos someplace but apparently have never scanned them into the computer.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I just found this thread and loved looking at all the tea items! Such lovely things! The appliances are amazing! Inever knew such things existed!! Thank you all!! I also got inspired...

Tea for one

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Separated:

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Small tea cup from waaaay back when!!

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Hungarian set

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More for coffee

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well known...

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Here are a few tea cups.

The white one on the left is about 150 ml in white bone china from silkroad.com. Simple, elegant and pleasant to drink from. Teas usually look their best against a white cup.

The small (30 ml) one in front that the - erm, photographer - neglected to turn to the front - has a fish design on  it. Used for gongfu.

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More on the other three:

Chinese tea cup from an Asian grocery

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Tea bowl, a gift from a friend many years ago, made by an Austin potter, name forgotten. A pleasnt vessel to drink from with its monks bowl shape. I use it for drinking Sencha.

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30 ml Yixing tea cup for gongfu from Chinese Teapot Gallery on eBay

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Hello-Regarding the tea cup you got from the asian grocery:1) I have a gaiwan of the same 2)Did you know that the thinner parts were created when rice grains, placed around the cup, were burned off during firing?


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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I received it as a gift. My friend brought it for me after traveling in Romania and Russia-she's from Russia but I will have to ask her where it is from-sorry!

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Here are a few tea cups.

The white one on the left is about 150 ml in white bone china from silkroad.com. Simple, elegant and pleasant to drink from. Teas usually look their best against a white cup.

The small (30 ml) one in front that the - erm, photographer - neglected to turn to the front - has a fish design on  it. Used for gongfu.

gallery_7582_6250_111912.jpg

More on the other three:

Chinese tea cup from an Asian grocery

gallery_7582_6250_9544.jpg

gallery_7582_6250_6809.jpg

Tea bowl, a gift from a friend many years ago, made by an Austin potter, name forgotten. A pleasnt vessel to drink from with its monks bowl shape. I use it for drinking Sencha.

gallery_7582_6250_2527.jpg

30 ml Yixing tea cup for gongfu from Chinese Teapot Gallery on eBay

gallery_7582_6250_114963.jpg

Hello-Regarding the tea cup you got from the asian grocery:1) I have a gaiwan of the same 2)Did you know that the thinner parts were created when rice grains, placed around the cup, were burned off during firing?

Interesting. I knew that rice grains were used, but not much in detail about how the effect is created.

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Here's a large Shino style yunomi, about 9 ounces, made by Ginny Marsh, a potter who now lives in the Dallas area. I use it for drinking Chinese green teas "grandpa style". It's a wonderful cup that feels good in the hands. I hope to have her make several smaller ones for me.

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Kerry Beal got me started on Brown Betty teapots, and here's another she sent me, along with a matching sugar bowl, some months ago. It is a larger pot, about 6 cups, and was made by Sadler, one of the most successful of the Stratfordshire potteries.

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This is a Kuromatsu Tokoname teapot made by Tokoname craftsman Gyokko that I got from Yuuki-cha.com. At a 120 ml capacity it is good for brewing about 60 - 90 ml of higher quality sencha or gyokuro. I love the texture of the unglazed clay.

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Got the pointers, but this is still quicker for now

My Webpage

From a trip to Wing Hop Fung in LA's chinatown recently. Decided I should try a gaiwan, and since they were so inexpensive (all except the clay pot were $2.99-$6.99), I got several. Also, since my favorite little glass teapot broke, I got another one that has a filter built into the spout.

A simple glass gaiwan, a porcelain gaiwan decorated with a fish, a simple ceramic gaiwan, glazed inside, a glass teapot, and a lovely unglazed clay pot.

Will edit or repost with embedded images in a few days.

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Images posted for gullet now--first the clay teapot

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The glass teapot

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The glass gaiwan

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The ceramic gaiwan

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and the cute porcelain gaiwan

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Have now used all but the porcelain gaiwan, and the glass teapot, and am slowly figuring the gaiwan out.

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Today made some lovely pouchong tea in the little glass pot, that I brought with me to work. It works as well as the clay pot, but is more practical for the variety of teas I have here and the limited space.

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I don't have any Chinese teapots. Instead, I prefer the tetsubin:

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The Le Creuset of teapots -- almost literally. Enamelled cast iron, and will still be around long after I'm gone. Their main drawback is Le Creuset-like prices; they're not cheap.

The one pictured is the one I use for most everything, with the major exception of Lapsang Souchong; I have a cheap Chinese knock-off tetsubin for that. The capacity is about 16 ounces (475 ml). It's a quite nice dark blue color that wears to reveal the black enamel underneath -- the color isn't quite done justice by the photo.

Someday, I'll have another to dedicate specifically for green tea, and maybe another for whites. I'm not that fussy at the moment.

BTW, pictured next to the tetsubin are (on the left), a silver tip white tea (fluffy and actually somewhat fuzzy leaves), and on the right, some jasmine silver pearls.

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Bought a small set of yixing teapots today at Wing Hop Fung, so I can have one each for oolong, ripe and cooked pu-erhs, and I bought a fourth because it was so small and cute that I couldn't leave without it.

The three new ones all said Yixing on the price stickers, and their prices ranged from $6.99-$8.99. I only noticed this as I was browsing this time. They're les purple than the one I bought a couple of weeks ago when I was looking for the most purple appearing one I could find.

So I'll print this out and put it inside the door to keep them straight. Just not sure what to do with the smallest one--it is tiny, and should be perfect for small gongfu style tastings of really precious teas, as it will take hardly any tea to fill it up.

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And I have their quantities down now too, after a session with the graduated cylinders. Next step, the very precise scale, which should arrive next week.

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I don't have any Chinese teapots. Instead, I prefer the tetsubin:

gallery_6594_807_56268.jpg

The Le Creuset of teapots -- almost literally. Enamelled cast iron, and will still be around long after I'm gone. Their main drawback is Le Creuset-like prices; they're not cheap.

The one pictured is the one I use for most everything, with the major exception of Lapsang Souchong; I have a cheap Chinese knock-off tetsubin for that. The capacity is about 16 ounces (475 ml). It's a quite nice dark blue color that wears to reveal the black enamel underneath -- the color isn't quite done justice by the photo.

Someday, I'll have another to dedicate specifically for green tea, and maybe another for whites. I'm not that fussy at the moment.

BTW, pictured next to the tetsubin are (on the left), a silver tip white tea (fluffy and actually somewhat fuzzy leaves), and on the right, some jasmine silver pearls.

That's a beautiful pot, but why do you prefer cast iron to porcelain and clay pots and what is it about these cast iron pots that you would want to dedicate several of them to various teas?

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I met Ginny Marsh at the Dallas Crafts Guild Ceramics Studio where she has been working on a variety of pieces for a Fall show at The Cultured Cup. I got there right after some work was coming out of the kiln shared by guild members.

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I really like this small yunomi and drank Sencha from it for the first time yesterday. It's just the right size for a 5 ounce cup of tea.

Ginny Marsh small  Yunomi Sept 2009 002.jpg

Ginny Marsh small  Yunomi Sept 2009 004.jpg

One more Ginny Marsh yunomi to show later.

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Another issue that has come up in recent brewings: I would like a neater teapot.

My little revere whistling kettle slops and splashes as I try to pour

one ounce of boiling or near boiling water into a small opening in the

neat little pots and gaiwans I have for brewing the tea, especially

gongfu style.

It is otherwise perfectly functional.

Are there any whistling kettles that have neater pouring spouts?

I will eventually break down and buy a nice tray for the tea service that includes a catch tray for drips, but at the rate I'm splashing now, anything smaller than a dishpan would fill up too fast.

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The "Windsor" type tea kettle should fit your needs.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_0_11?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=windsor+tea+kettle&x=0&y=0&sprefix=Windsor+tea It pours a very fine stream, very precise. These are at Amazon US but if you are in the UK you should be able to find them easily - I have a couple and my original one was made in England.

However your could also use a stainless steel funnel - a bit cheaper and certainly just as functional. :smile:


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Finding a lot of rave reviews for the simplex. I'd never keep the copper shiny, but the spout does look a lot more controllable than my little Revere. But while reading reviews about it I slopped a bunch more water on the counter....so it's looking pretty reasonable at Amazon's price.

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You may also be interested in a Capresso electric water kettle. I got my current one from friend and eG Society member Tony Boulton and I am sure they are available elsewhere also. I previously used an English copper Windsor and really liked the look, but the Capresso is so much more practical. It heats water much faster and more efficently than a stove top kettle, so I also use it when I need hot water in a pan, or for a stock, brasie or stew, to give it a head start.

Another option is a Chinese electric water kettle that works great for tea brewing, gong fu especially. They have them at your favorite Chinese grocery market. These things work better as a dedicated gong fu water heater than my Capresso and I'll eventually spring for one.

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I don't have any Chinese teapots. Instead, I prefer the tetsubin:

gallery_6594_807_56268.jpg

The Le Creuset of teapots -- almost literally. Enamelled cast iron, and will still be around long after I'm gone. Their main drawback is Le Creuset-like prices; they're not cheap.

The one pictured is the one I use for most everything, with the major exception of Lapsang Souchong; I have a cheap Chinese knock-off tetsubin for that. The capacity is about 16 ounces (475 ml). It's a quite nice dark blue color that wears to reveal the black enamel underneath -- the color isn't quite done justice by the photo.

Someday, I'll have another to dedicate specifically for green tea, and maybe another for whites. I'm not that fussy at the moment.

BTW, pictured next to the tetsubin are (on the left), a silver tip white tea (fluffy and actually somewhat fuzzy leaves), and on the right, some jasmine silver pearls.

That's a beautiful pot, but why do you prefer cast iron to porcelain and clay pots and what is it about these cast iron pots that you would want to dedicate several of them to various teas?

I'm curious as to the answer, as well. In Japan tetsubin are rarely used for brewing water much less for making tea (and then it's the lined tetsubin that are used). I've always seen the use of tetsubin for brewing tea as a Western affectation, but I'm curious if people really see a benefit (flavour-wise) to using tetsubin. The only benefit I can think of would be that it holds heat longer, but that would not necessarily improve the flavour of the tea (particularly since Japanese teas should be brewed in smaller amounts for best flavour).

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