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The Kitchin, Edinburgh


YKL
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Am surprised that there doesn't seem to be a thread for the Kitchin - so am taking the liberty to start one to feedback on a cheeky lunch last weekend. We had a splendid time with some very good food - well worth the mad dash from Glasgow.

It's been on my radar for a while; an illustrious CV, a menu stuffed full of seafood and game in accordance with their strapline of “from nature to plate” and plenty of regional and national pride as befits one of Scotland’s brightest young chefs. The glimpses of Tom Kitchin’s food from his appearance on the “Great British Menu” earlier this year whetted our appetites further and so our expectations were pretty high as we arrived on Saturday 4th Oct for lunch.

And am very glad we made the effort since the food was so good. The service in the main room was more formal than we anticipated, but maybe that's just a personal thing.

Photos and menu notes below - still playing with new camera and the best shot is of the petit fours which was taken in the glass conservatory - if only we could have eaten out there!

We’d been perusing the menu for weeks on the website for weeks, and the choice was as difficult as we’d anticipated with a good value set lunch menu (3 courses for £24.50) and an more elaborate and ambitious ALC. There was also a tasting menu option, but as a group of four, we figured we would have more fun if we ordered different dishes and tasted from each other’s plates. Well, good food is made for sharing isn’t it? And for those situations where we were struggling to make a selection of only 4 dishes, um, well, er, we ordered an extra starter and dessert. Well - it saved us making a difficult choice!! So we had …

(items from the set lunch menu denoted by an *)

Pre amuse of pumpkin soup

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I know, I know, pumpkin soup is such a cliché as an amuse during the autumn months - but this was very very good. There were delicate notes of cinnamon and cumin which played so well with the sweetness, and turned something which could have been so bland and dull into something more much exciting and yet still familiar. Things were looking promising.

Starters

* Venison - braised haunch of venison ravioli served with roasted chestnuts and quince

* Crab - brown crab from Anstruther served with a salad of celeriac, apple and hazelnuts

Snails and bone marrow - sautéed organic snails from Devon served with roasted bone marrow and a garlic and parsley risotto

Langoustine and Pig’s Head - Roasted langoustine tail from Anstruther with boned and rolled pig’s head served with a crispy ear salad

Sea - from our Scottish shores, an assiette of seafood served with pickled cucumber, dill and crème fraiche

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For me, the all conquering champion from this selection was the langoustine and pigs head - rich, delicious and again some restrained spicing to tickle the palate, and the pig‘s ear lattice was a taste and textural delight . I had to remind myself that we were sharing otherwise I’d have scoffed the entire plate. I can see why this is something of a signature dish.

Mind you, the snails and bone marrow were pretty damn fine too - the photo shows a goodly portion of the bone marrow having been hacked off already - clearly I wasn’t speedy enough with my camera. But my slow reflexes aside - this was very very good - big butch robust flavours, almost rustic in its appearance (apart from the fried quail’s egg … not sure of its place) and universally praised around the table.

The venison ravioli was good - incredibly rich though, and we all felt that we’d eaten the entire ravioli (raviolo?) ourselves, it may have crossed the line excessive richness and possibly been cloying. The crab salad was nice - fresh and clean, and also appeared on the “sea” plate - which was nice enough, but given that this was the extra starter that we had ordered out of greed (a plate of Scottish seafood in the hands of a good chef - surely we mustn’t miss out!) - we were less overwhelmed than we expected. Maybe we’re being harsh, but we certainly weren’t swooning as with the pig’s head and the marrow. God - dribbling now at the recollection in fact!

Mains

* Partridge - Red leg partridge roasted on the bone , served with braised red cabbage and bread sauce

* Halibut - seared wild halibut served with herb potato gnocchi, Jerusalem artichoke, chorizo and wild mushrooms

Venison - Roast saddle of venison from the Invercauld Estate, served with beetroot and celeriac gratin, pear, chestnuts and a juniper berry sauce

Hare - a la royale …. (sorry, forgot the accompaniments, but this was one of the specials of the day)

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Have the venison! Have the venison! Have the venison! Did you get that? Yes, menu winner for me was Bambi - quite possibly the most delicious venison I have ever eaten and the silky smooth beetroot and celeriac gratin was stupendous. A fabulous and generous plate of food. My smile was quite broad as I ate this.

Of the others - the partridge was pretty good, and considering it was on the set lunch menu, then very impressive. The hare was fine, but not as wonderful as I’d hoped (although the foie serving was very generous so points for that) - and the halibut may have been a mite overcooked. Shame really - everything else was so well done.

Still - venison was bloody good though

Desserts

*Orange - bitter orange crème brulee served with praline ice cream

*Apple - apple soufflé served with cinnamon ice cream

Plums & honey - Iced parfait of Heather Hills clover honey served with pickled plums and oat crumble

Hibiscus and Raspberry - Hibiscus scented pannacotta served with macerated Perthshire raspberries and mini floating islands

Pear and toffee - the classic Edinburgh Fog served A la Kitchin with Drambuie, pears and toffee

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Um ….. All of these were good - think the Pear and Toffee was my favourite but not by much. All were light, delicate and a satisfying end to the meal. So no standouts but no clunkers either.

We finished with some Mint tea, flowering silver tip tea and petit fours in the lounge and more giggling and catch up.

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We didn’t drink much - an aperitif each, some mineral water and a couple of glasses of wine in total - and bill was just over £300 incl. tip. Given that we did two set menus here then it’s not necessarily somewhere one could eat ALC every week - but what a treat when you can. I don’t know when I can next get back - but I sincerely hope it is not to be my only visit

Recommended if you’re in the area.

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There were some brief comments here. I agree that Kitchin is excellent. I stumbled upon it by accident very shortly after it gained its * a couple of years ago. The wine list, although limited, is very sensible. The first time I went I was seated directly in front of the kitchen. As I was dining alone and they thought I was a reviewer, and inserted random courses in between my ordered dishes, while being stared at from the pass by the man himself.

It's definitely rather more laid back than Wishart or Number One, and to its credit it deserves praise for its own individual style and unique cuisine.

H

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Aye, a great place. I'm aiming to have lunch there when I take some time off work in the next two or three weeks. However, places are fluid so I'm not sure what day I'll be going for. Did you need to book far in advance, YKL?

PS

Edinburgh

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Great pics. So far the best dining experince I have had this year was at the Kitchin. I had the tasting with matching wines, which was a real treat. The sommelier was excellent and played around with some of the wines based around some of my favourite regions.

The food is astounding, it really is. The sig dish which YKL talks about is truly amazing. I think Tom Kitchin is one of the best chef's around at the moment.

After my meal, the head waiter came and asked for some feedback on each course, as the kitchen wanted to know my opinion, which I thought was nice.

Also when I asked for a copy of the menu they had already 'done it' and arrived scroll like with a little tartan ribbbon, another nice touch.

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:) Glad you all like it

Did you need to book far in advance, YKL?

I chose to book a couple of months in advance because that we could only do that date, and specifically only that lunchtime. So sorry, don't know how much notice is needed.

The room was full though so my impression is that if you're going for a more popular slots (e.g. weekends), probably best not to leave it too close. But they were charming on the phone when I spoke to them.

Does that help?

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Thanks YKL - it helps to the extent that you've convinced me to pull my finger out and not leave it to the last minute to book. I'm pretty flexible and am planning on going midweek, so fingers crossed...

Cheers,

Philip

PS

Edinburgh

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  • 5 months later...
Great pics. So far the best dining experince I have had this year was at the Kitchin. I had the tasting with matching wines, which was a real treat. The sommelier was excellent and played around with some of the wines based around some of my favourite regions.

The food is astounding, it really is. The sig dish which YKL talks about is truly amazing. I think Tom Kitchin is one of the best chef's around at the moment.

After my meal, the head waiter came and asked for some feedback on each course, as the kitchen wanted to know my opinion, which I thought was nice.

Also when I asked for a copy of the menu they had already 'done it' and arrived scroll like with a little tartan ribbbon, another nice touch.

Hmm, I hate to be controversial here but I'm currently less than impressed with the Kitchin.

I've been a regular visitor since it opened, my first visit was it's second weekend open and since then it was one of my frequent business lunch haunts and a favoured spot for a meal with the family, so it's fair to say that I was a fan which is why I was very disappointed in my last visit in January this year.

After a round of indifferent starters, my wife and her mother shared a Dover Sole which was portioned at tableside, well it was chewed up by inept service onto cold plates and arrived in front of them at what seemed like below room temprature. Now, I do like the grandeur of tableside preparation but I would suggest a competant waiter would be a pre-requisit.

My main was worse, I ordered the Woodcock and was served a plate of brown. A plate of overly rich brown that I couldn't finish. As this was the first time I'd eaten Woodcock I don't have a comparison to the quality of the meat but the breasts were edible once the slick of brown (again) sauce had been scraped off, the sauce overpowered everything it touched. The innards were mushed into a pate, mixed with foie gras and served on a crouton (under the meat and more of that damnable sauce) and I found this completely inedible; it was far, far too rich. Now, I'm someone that likes rich, I poach lobster in butter for god's sake (thank you the sainted Thomas Keller for sharing that one) but this pate was horrible.

I left the plate having eaten less than half of it and this wasn't noticed until the table was cleared for dessert, the waitress asked me if it was okay and when I explained that it wasn't nice she didn't even appologise. Frankly if I'm dropping £25/£30 on a plate then I'd like to be able to eat it, I appreciate that foods might not be to everyone's taste but if a plate is sent back 3/4 full I'd hope a better restaurant wouldn't charge for it. I was charged. There was certainly no solicitous interest in detailed feedback.

The service (the staff seemed all different since I had last been there) was indifferent at best and we felt we were being rushed (we were told we couldn't have the tasting menu as they needed the table back).

I noticed that photos of Tom now adorn the walls of the room, sadly I'm led to wonder if he's buying into his own hype and taking his eye off the ball; Michaela was wonderful front of house but I'm guessing she's now at home with their new little 'un. Whoever's replaced her managing the room is Cafe Rouge standard, not Michelin I'm afraid.

I'm gutted that I've lost one one of my favourite haunts but why would I risk another £300/£400 when I can confidently go to the Plumed Horse, Martin Wishart or Abstract?

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  • 1 month later...

It seems quite strange that I should be writing this review, having read Ross's comments above and especially so that we should both also be dining at 21212 the other night.

However as restaurants have off nights, and Tom Kitchin had recently featured on GBM, I thought to give it a try.

We went for lunch, and we had a very long drive ahead of us so mindful that a very big meal may have made me a bit drowsy, we opted for the set menu.

Eel and Leek terrine, beetroot and apple.

Asparagus,asparagus puree, hollandaise sauce.

Sea trout spring vegetables, sorrel sauce.

Lamb from Dornoch,kidney, crisp belly, compote of red onions.

Pistachio souffle, pistachio ice cream.

Rhubarb tart, rhubarb and hibiscus sorbet.

Pre Dessert was a wonderful flavoured Pea Soup topped with a quenelle of creme fraiche, we really enjoyed this.

I started with the terrine, which was as pretty as a picture, surrounded with small spots of beetroot, interspersed with crisp green apple, this was top notch.

The asparagus was just classic freshness on the plate.

I had my first Sea Trout of the season, pretty good, cooked to perfection, crispy skin. Spring veg and Sorrel sauce completed the dish.

Wee baby Lamb, with lots of extra flavours, the onions flavoured with szechuan pepper and apricot. crispy belly is now on my "to cook" list again.

Mrs G's souffle was very well risen, and more to the point delish.

I had the rhubarb(again), Its on all the menus, up and down the country, obviously because its bang in season.

It was very well presented, and tasted as well as it looked.

Portion sizes were just about right for a lunch service, and the cooking was to Michelin standard.

Tom was one of nine in the kitching along with two stages, one of whom was on pastry.

The room was almost full, and everyone had the set lunch, with perhaps one deviation, the table for one, who looked like a mixture of Ray Winstone and John Terry tucking into a large plate of oysters before embarking on the menu proper.

We ate all of them with him (wishfully).

Pretty good end to our fleeting visit to Edinburgh, a real shame its so far away,

But never too far :biggrin:

2 Campari & soda £9.10

2x 3 course lunch £49

2 Villavieja

Chenin blanc-Torrentes£13

1 Arteo Nero D'Avola

Sicily, Italy £6.50

Total £77.60 plus tip

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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Good to hear that you enjoyed your lunch David; I suppose the big issue for me was the service, the kitchen can have off nights (though 3 poor mains out of 4 is rather unfortunate) but I do think it can be made better by recognition that the guest didn't enjoy his £28 plate.

I noticed Katie deal with a return at 21212 on Wednesday (it was the third table and from what I saw the kitchen had sent the beef exactly as requested, medium well - the diner wanted cremated* but hadn't asked for it), it was swifly and very politely managed with an appropriate and undeserved appology. I do not that Michela is just as good but if she's not there, how does the room fare?

I just think £400 for a meal is too much money to spend on the off chance that things have improved, especially with Martin Wishart, Paul Kitching, The Plumed Horse and Abstract as other options; though I dare say I'll be back at Kitchen soon enough anyway, my Father-in-Law does have a soft spot for Tom after watching him grow up on the farm next door.

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Good to hear that you enjoyed your lunch David; I suppose the big issue for me was the service, the kitchen can have off nights (though 3 poor mains out of 4 is rather unfortunate) but I do think it can be made better by recognition that the guest didn't enjoy his £28 plate.

I noticed Katie deal with a return at 21212 on Wednesday (it was the third table and from what I saw the kitchen had sent the beef exactly as requested, medium well - the diner wanted cremated* but hadn't asked for it), it was swifly and very politely managed with an appropriate and undeserved appology. I do not that Michela is just as good but if she's not there, how does the room fare?

I just think £400 for a meal is too much money to spend on the off chance that things have improved, especially with Martin Wishart, Paul Kitching, The Plumed Horse and Abstract as other options; though I dare say I'll be back at Kitchen soon enough anyway, my Father-in-Law does have a soft spot for Tom after watching him grow up on the farm next door.

There is no point in front of house not quickly and effectively dealing with a bad dish, the repercussions can be swingeing, especially if the customers are bloggers :laugh:

Really poor show on the waiters side, it should have been compted, at the very least the manager should have been informed.

I had a bad dish at a mid market Italian a few months back, it was whisked away, no fuss whatsoever, end of.

Imagine how they must feel though, when the punter cocks the job with a cremated beef request.

Still no fuss is the best way forward

I'm sure you will go back, it surely can't happen again?

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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I'm sure you will go back, it surely can't happen again?

You're probably right, it's odds-on that I'll be back before the end of the year as my Father-in-Law's a big fan; I just hope it is better as the thought of Tom's ability and potential being wasted depresses me.

Next time you venture to the Athens of the North to visit 21212, you should definately try Restaurant Martin Wishart; it's rather more "Michelin" than the Kitchin or 21212 but is simply exquisite and truly deserves a second star.

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I'm sure you will go back, it surely can't happen again?

You're probably right, it's odds-on that I'll be back before the end of the year as my Father-in-Law's a big fan; I just hope it is better as the thought of Tom's ability and potential being wasted depresses me.

Next time you venture to the Athens of the North to visit 21212, you should definately try Restaurant Martin Wishart; it's rather more "Michelin" than the Kitchin or 21212 but is simply exquisite and truly deserves a second star.

Ross, I totally agree with your comments with regards to Kitchins. I made the trip last year and it was the biggest disappointment, let down of the year. I've never being able to understand all the fuss, other than kitchin is on the telly, which obviously carries a ton of weight. My misses had an awful meal. The worst of it, a very poorly cooked lamb main dish. This was further compounded by the diner next to us, a certain Mr J Rayner, who was eating the same dish and it looked spot on, after we 'compared'! Plus the fact he was also getting plied with virtually every bit of the menu, which came across as false and prententious. I still stand by my comments I made last year. I firmly believe that Kitchin is far more concerned with being famous than anything else.

Edited by food1 (log)
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thanks for the photos, Kitchin is one of my future visiting places. I really like the plating and the saucing specifically. No smears, no wiped purees, no dots. just a good amount of sauce over the food. good stuff!!

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Part of me had hoped I wouldn't read an account of someone having a similar experience. :sad:

When The Kitchin first opened it's hallmark was well executed plates with a pared down number of ingredients and wonderful clean and punchy flavours; this did seem to change when Tom debuted on GBM and he started espousing his "philosophy" of 'From Nature to Plate' - from around then I thought the house style evolved into a heavier, earthier offering culminating in my plate of brown.

Frankly I do start doubting chefs when they start describing their approach/belief/style as a "philosophy"; let's face it Tom isn't exactly Nietzsche, Satre or Schopenhaur and neither are the other "food philosophers"; they're cooks ffs, some could be described as artists, some visionaries and some scientists, but I've yet to see one produce a treatise similar to "Thus Spoke Zarathustra".

Still, hopefully David's right and when I return Michela will be in charge of the dining room and Tom will be more careful with the food.

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Frankly I do start doubting chefs when they start describing their approach/belief/style as a "philosophy"; let's face it Tom isn't exactly Nietzsche, Satre or Schopenhaur and neither are the other "food philosophers"; they're cooks ffs, some could be described as artists, some visionaries and some scientists, but I've yet to see one produce a treatise similar to "Thus Spoke Zarathustra".

I find it quite puzzling when you say -

‘’Frankly I do start doubting chefs when they start describing their approach/belief/style as a "philosophy";’’

- because approach/belief/style is a good way to describe an actual philosophy.

You then produce the list below to describe how you feel about some chefs -

.artists

.visionaries

.scientists

when it could easily be argued, using your own logic (see below), that chefs are none of these either.

.artist - Vincent van Gogh

.visionary - Isaac Asimov

.scientist - Galileo

Personally I think you can find all of these disciplines to some degree in a great chef.

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Personally I think you can find all of these disciplines to some degree in a great chef.

Um, I think that was my point.

Anyhoo, to preclude an argument on semantics, I'll hold my hands up and say my dislike for chef/philosophers is probably personal prejudice; I cringe with the pretence at the inaccurate (in my view) use of the word, especially when I think there are truer available which reflect better on the chef.

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  • 1 year later...

Tom Kitchin is a chef I would love to hate, as I tend to dislike that overly media-savvy, philosophising ilk. I also felt awkward and there was no sympathy on one occasion I talked to him.

Nevertheless, I have now been there twice, once in July 2010 and the other last night, both times having the tasting menu, and both times finding it brilliantly well constructed, with almost all dishes being superlative (it was the desserts that seemed to be in a lower league).

For what I've tried so far, The Kitchin is the best in Edinburgh in terms of sheer power, as well as cleanliness and balance, of flavours. The 'fresh' dishes (e.g. an octopus carpaccio with pickeld vegetables) are suavely fresh and the 'strong' ones (e.g. a wild seabass poached in red wine) are truly strong. There are flashes of simple genius such as a supremely succulent scallop on 'endive tarte tatin'.

I know Wishart is a fantastic talent and the gold comparative, but my experience there just did not deliver the same wow in terms of flavour (will try again), though I find the room and the environment much more comfortable there. Over three hours on a Kitchin chair are not completely relaxing for me.

Anyway, a great dinner, during which we had time to reflect on the fact that here in Scotland the quality and freshness of the ingredients (that lobster, those scallops...) is on average sooo superior to what we find in London.

PS A 2011 innovation is that now they have a 'bread trolley', a giant basket with eight, nine varieties, sourced from multiple bakeries, which are explained at length to you by a waitress, cheese-style. (we like the theatre of it and appreciated the variety, but the bread was merely good, not stunning).

Edited by Man (log)
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  • 1 year later...

Annual pilgrimage to the Kitchin. Just to report that they are firing on all cylinders and if you are in Edinburgh in the Summer and have just one choice, choose this one. Best lunch of the year so far, in a city that has no shortage of good restaurants.

Had the signature pig's head and langoustine (including a cripy pig's ear) that was, quite simply, stunning for flavour and texture. A special of lobster a la plancha made me think it would be hard to have a better lobster. In a dish of scallops and asparagus, what lovely, lovely ingredients. And a stuffed rabbit with crispy legs and the kidneys on the side, again, featured flavours and textures playing together beautifully.

Previously weak points have been improved: desserts are now excellent (especially a cherry and oat souffle'), and the uncomfortable chairs have been replaced by comfortable upholstered ones, with other improvements to the furnishing: larger tables, new curtains etc.). Gone has the bread trolley (last year's innovation, but apparently they decided they have too many trolleys in the room); I think making bread in-house may be the next improving step.

Kitchin is a force of nature in the kitchen.

IMG_0906.JPG

Edited by Man (log)
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Annual pilgrimage to the Kitchin. Just to report that they are firing on all cylinders and if you are in Edinburgh in the Summer and have just one choice, choose this one. Best lunch of the year so far, in a city that has no shortage of good restaurants.

Had the signature pig's head and langoustine (including a cripy pig's ear) that was, quite simply, stunning for flavour and texture. A special of lobster a la plancha made me think it would be hard to have a better lobster. In a dish of scallops and asparagus, what lovely, lovely ingredients. And a stuffed rabbit with crispy legs and the kidneys on the side, again, featured flavours and textures playing together beautifully.

Previously weak points have been improved: desserts are now excellent (especially a cherry and oat souffle'), and the uncomfortable chairs have been replaced by comfortable upholstered ones, with other improvements to the furnishing: larger tables, new curtains etc.). Gone has the bread trolley (last year's innovation, but apparently they decided they have too many trolleys in the room); I think making bread in-house may be the next improving step.

Kitchin is a force of nature in the kitchen.

Sounds good. Obviously the carte. Not the set lunch with those luxury ingredients?

How did it compare up against Martin Wishart or Castle Terrace?

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

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Annual pilgrimage to the Kitchin. Just to report that they are firing on all cylinders and if you are in Edinburgh in the Summer and have just one choice, choose this one. Best lunch of the year so far, in a city that has no shortage of good restaurants.

Had the signature pig's head and langoustine (including a cripy pig's ear) that was, quite simply, stunning for flavour and texture. A special of lobster a la plancha made me think it would be hard to have a better lobster. In a dish of scallops and asparagus, what lovely, lovely ingredients. And a stuffed rabbit with crispy legs and the kidneys on the side, again, featured flavours and textures playing together beautifully.

Previously weak points have been improved: desserts are now excellent (especially a cherry and oat souffle'), and the uncomfortable chairs have been replaced by comfortable upholstered ones, with other improvements to the furnishing: larger tables, new curtains etc.). Gone has the bread trolley (last year's innovation, but apparently they decided they have too many trolleys in the room); I think making bread in-house may be the next improving step.

Kitchin is a force of nature in the kitchen.

Sounds good. Obviously the carte. Not the set lunch with those luxury ingredients?

How did it compare up against Martin Wishart or Castle Terrace?

Yes the a la carte - the set lunch by the way, while not featuring luxury ingredients, is great value, and if there is one who knows how to treat the less noble parts of the animal or 'lesser' ingredients, that is Kitchin.

Castle Terrace, they laughed at me when I tried to book with just a few days notice :) . We cannot plan in advance and so probably we'll never set a foot in - we were lucky with The Kitchin to get a rare cancellation for a Saturday lunch at short notice.

Martin Wishart is the opposite of Kitchin. The dishes are far more elaborate and 'clever', the environment is more formal, less 'young' (Oh dear, that would be for me then...). Still immaculate ingredients, still a great chef.

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