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VivreManger

Where to buy game in Paris

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A question has arisen in the Montreal/Quebec forum about the provenance of game in France. Carswell has alerted us to the fact that in France, as opposed to North America, restaurants and shops are allowed to sell wild hunted game as well as farm-raised. I understand that much of the game available in France now comes form Eastern Europe, particularly Poland.

Is that true and is this Polish game wild or farmed?

All that said, I would still assume that restaurants specializing in game such as au Petit Marguery would still offer the highest quality, namely hunted meat.

Any information to be added to the discussion?

For the original dissussion see, http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...=0entry332462

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We had pigeon for lunch today. I bought 2 for each of us since they are such little birds. The last time we had quail one each was not enough. They cost about €2 each already larded at the butcher.

IMG_0205.JPG

The birds fit nicely on the spit.

IMG_0211.JPG

I made a "vinaigrette" using melted butter and a coarse household vinegar, and some salt. Since these birds don't cook very long I don't worry about the vinegar drawing out the fluids.

IMG_0213.JPG

Grill on the spit for 20 minutes on 270 degrees celcius. Just enough to crisp the outside.

IMG_0232.JPG

Served with leftover lentils which were initally simmered with a heavy sage bouquet and finished just before the meal with yesterday's chicken foot stock.

IMG_0247.JPG

One of these birds was enough, really. They are extremely meaty in comparison to quail. We saved the other two for later.

This was followed by an escarole salad and the cheese plate.

It's a wonderful season.

:smile::smile::smile:

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I am looking to try new varieties of Venison. I am only really familiar with Venison from the US (Maine) and Venison from smaller coops in New Zealand. I can't remember ever having French venison. Has anyone tried French venison and can comment on the quality? How about venison from the Czech Republic? I have heard a lot of Venison comes from there and eastern Europe in general but I have yet to try. Also does anyone know of a butcher that specializes in Venison or other game meats? Or is that something I just need to order from my butchers?


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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A lot of game (birds especially, for instance woodcock) come from Scandinavia. For birds, ask a volailler (there are still a few). Le Coq Saint-Honoré is a good place.

Any good butcher will know how to source game and venison.

Look around markets too. I'd go to the covered market in Aligre.

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Piétrement Lambret, in the 1st, has game in season, including venison, partridge, pheasant and deer.

Piétrement Lambret,

58, rue Jean Jacques Rosseau, 1st.

01 42 33 30 50


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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This is a very valuable addition to the topics already running on vocabulary, restaurants and season, etc. Thanks all.

I would merely add that my local (general) butcher La Bucherie Nouvelle at 13 Rue du Poteau in the 18th has ample game of the winged, hopping and leaping variety in season.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Just a heads up, Pietrement Lambret is closed down. I'm not sure if this is permanent or if they are remodeling, but the windows are painted over and the interior is full of cement bags and construction equipment.


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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Just to let you know, I noticed game at one of the butchers in the covered part of the marché Aligre this morning.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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I would merely add that my local (general) butcher La Bucherie Nouvelle at 13 Rue du Poteau in the 18th has ample game of the winged, hopping and leaping variety in season.

Felice's note reminded me that I meant it was available now, indeed weeks ago, at least fowl and hare.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Friends, game season is upon us. what is a good place to buy game in Paris? I'm looking for the best markets and boucheries.. I went yesterday to Pres. Wilson and didn't find anything other then the ordinary there, like rabbit and some fowl. Where can i find things like deer, wild boar?


Edited by Le Peche (log)

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I don't think pigeon is considered to be "game" in the traditional fall sense (it's a year round dish). We were told at our hotel that its game menu will not start until October 8 - official start of game season (at least in the hotel). Robyn

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I don't think pigeon is considered to be "game" in the traditional fall sense (it's a year round dish).  We were told at our hotel that its game menu will not start until October 8 - official start of game season (at least in the hotel).  Robyn

I am told by my butcher (in the UK) that it is best to buy game a couple of weeks after the season begins as it is generally best to hang the meat for a little while to let it relax and soften. Maybe this is the reason the hotel hasn't started serving it yet.

A question. Is the "game season" in France for all game or do different species have different seasons?

In the UK Hare starts on 1st August, Grouse 12th August (The Glorious Twelfth), Partridge 1st September, and Pheasant 1st October.

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Yes, games in France have differents "seasons" but overall the season is fall. Now there are complex legislation as some animals (eg becasse) can be hunted but not sold.

The butcher on rue Montorgueil apparently called "au boeuf du cantal" had nice game today: hare, wild duck, perdreau (don't know the English name)...

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I eat pigeon all the time, buy it in Normandie, Paris, and Provence, and have never seen such tiny pigeons as in your photo. Sure that wasn't quail? Also, even in 2004, pigeon cost considerably more than €2. That's a quail price. This is a VERY delayed response, I realize!

We had pigeon for lunch today.  I bought 2 for each of us since they are such little birds.  The last time we had quail one each was not enough.  They cost about €2 each already larded at the butcher. 

IMG_0205.JPG

The birds fit nicely on the spit. 

IMG_0211.JPG

I made a "vinaigrette" using melted butter and a coarse household vinegar, and some salt.  Since these birds don't cook very long I don't worry about the vinegar drawing out the fluids. 

IMG_0213.JPG

Grill on the spit for 20 minutes on 270 degrees celcius.  Just enough to crisp the outside. 

IMG_0232.JPG

Served with leftover lentils which were initally simmered with a heavy sage bouquet and finished just before the meal with yesterday's chicken foot stock.

IMG_0247.JPG

One of these birds was enough, really.  They are extremely meaty in comparison to quail.  We saved the other two for later. 

This was followed by an escarole salad and the cheese plate. 

It's a wonderful season. 

:smile:  :smile:  :smile:


bwilde, gardening and cooking my way through France at L'Atelier Vert

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That's right, pigeon is farmed in France. Some of the best comes from Bresse, as well as Provence, where raising them is a tradition. In my part of Haute Provence, many houses (including ours) have pigeonniers--a sort of pigeon-roosting tower with access holes on the outside, often surrounded by glazed tiles which attract the pigeons.

I don't think pigeon is considered to be "game" in the traditional fall sense (it's a year round dish).  We were told at our hotel that its game menu will not start until October 8 - official start of game season (at least in the hotel).  Robyn


bwilde, gardening and cooking my way through France at L'Atelier Vert

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Most upscale butcher shops in Paris will order anything you want with a couple of days notice (read, they'll get it on their next trip to Rungis). I highly recommend trying to get marcassin , or young wild boar. Make sure it is hunted and not farm-raised. The former is much more flavorful.

Friends, game season is upon us. what is a good place to buy game in Paris? I'm looking for the best markets and boucheries.. I went yesterday to Pres. Wilson and didn't find anything other then the ordinary there, like rabbit and some fowl. Where can i find things like deer, wild boar?


bwilde, gardening and cooking my way through France at L'Atelier Vert

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