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Richard Kilgore

What Tea Are You Drinking Today? (Part 1)

600 posts in this topic

What are you all drinking today?

For me it's a Chinese red tea: a Dian Hong Imperiale from Norbutea.com. Brewed western style, but in a 300 ml Yixing teapot. Have had 6 infusions using about 240 - 250 ml water for each infusion, with 3.7 grams of leaf. This is my favorite red tea so far.

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I received an order from www.shanshuiteas.com yesterday-

this morning i enjoyed wulong superior-


Edited by jpr54_ (log)

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my morning brew today is lanyun winter 2007 fromwww.shanshuiteas.com

the dry leaves were long and twisted slightly-

the tea liquor is light yelllow - taste is slightly dry, and flowery-

joanne

it is a green oolong


Edited by jpr54_ (log)

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my morning brew today is lanyun winter 2007 fromwww.shanshuiteas.com

the dry leaves were long and twisted slightly-

the tea liquor is light yelllow -  taste is slightly dry, and flowery-

joanne

What type of Oolong is that, Joanne?

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Today I am drinking a Mariage Freres tea from The Cultured Cup: 1854, named after the founding of the company. It is similar to Earl Gray, or perhaps closer to a Lady Gray, but with Oolong in the blend. I like it better than traditional Earl Grays and usually drink it without milk.

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Today I am drinking a Mariage Freres tea from The Cultured Cup: 1854, named after the founding of the company. It is similar to Earl Gray, or perhaps closer to a Lady Gray, but with Oolong in the blend. I like it better than traditional Earl Grays and usually drink it without milk.

One great thing about Oolong in the blend is that I got three good infusions and a fourth okay infusion out of this tea. That makes it not only tasty, but especially cost effective for a finer morning tea. The infusions were 3, 4, 6, 9 minutes.

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Hello- Recently, I had some "cloud and mist" (sounds so much better that "cloud and fog"). I liked it, it tasted like a lighter version of my usual Dragon Well A.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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one of my favorite tea online co. is www.thefragrantleaf.com-

i received yesterday my most recent order

bai hao formosa oolong

shan lin xi oolong

high mountain oolng

wenshan baozhong

dong ding oolong

robyn consistently carries good quality teas at reasonable prices-

last evening i had the shan lin xi which had a chestnut like aroma and taste-the liquor was alight gold

this morning i am enjoying the high mountain

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one of my favorite tea online co. is www.thefragrantleaf.com-

i received yesterday my most recent order

bai hao formosa oolong

shan lin xi oolong

high mountain oolng

wenshan baozhong

dong ding oolong

robyn consistently carries good quality teas at reasonable prices-

last evening i had the shan lin xi which had a chestnut like aroma and taste-the liquor was alight gold

this morning i am enjoying the high mountain

The chestnut aroma and taste of the shan lin xi sounds interesting, Joanne. Did you brew it gongfu or western style? How many infusions do you get from it and do they change much?

First for me today is MF French Breakfast that I picked up from The Cultured Cup yesterday. This is the best commercial breakfast blend I have had. (One of the personal blends Kyle created for me may - just may - be better, but it is also more expensive.) I was able to get three good infusions out of it, and usually most black tea blends only give one or two.

So what tea are you all drinking today?

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this is description of tea from their website:

"Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong

Grown near the Dong Ding region at an elevation of 1,600 meters amidst a forest of cedar trees and bamboo, Shan Lin Xi oolong tea is a favorite among Taiwan tea lovers. It has a light, floral aroma with a hint of bamboo and a crisp, sweet flavor and dry finish. The slight astringency is refreshing and palate cleansing.

We selected this premium batch of Gao Shan (“high mountain”) tea from the Lin Family tea farm in Feng Huang village. Award-winning tea masters, the Lins cultivate their tea plants organically and carefully hand-pick the leaves.

High mountain grown teas are highly prized by tea connoisseurs in Taiwan. The environmental conditions are ideal for growing high-quality tea. The sharp difference in day and night temperatures allow the tea plants to grow more slowly, thus developing more aroma and sweetness. And the abundant cloud and fog surrounding the mountains allow the tealeaves to absorb more moisture.

Brewing Recommendation: This tea is best enjoyed gongfu style as the leaves can be re-steeped many times.

Origin: Taiwan, Nantou County, Lugu Township, Feng Huang Village.

Harvest: Spring 2008

Oxidation Level: 15%

"

it is interesting that robyn describes tea- floral aroma with hint of bamboo-

it does taste sweet- i am not sure of terms crisp and hint of bamboo(i said-chestnut)

i brewed tea gong fu style and re-steeped 2 times

joanne

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This evening a Chinese green tea from The Cultured Cup: Mao Jian "Hair Needle Tea" from the Henan Province. Brewed Western style - 2 grams to 8 ounces water. Two infusions (1: 1'45"; 2: 2'15"). I enjoyed the second infusion more, and this one should go at least one more infusion. (I think the first infusion may have been better at 1'45" or 2', but the second infusion was smoother anyway.) Very pleasant mild vegetal flavor with no astringency.

This is one of the best Chinese green teas I have tasted. But I have a few unopened ones yet to try.

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Drinking an Irish Breakfast today so far.

What tea is everyone else drinking today?

I think that's a pretty strongly flavored tea, isn't it Richard? Did you get it at CC? I'm running out of what I bought there on my first trip and need more.

Anyway, I just made a pot of Ceylon Sultane.


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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Drinking an Irish Breakfast today so far.

What tea is everyone else drinking today?

I think that's a pretty strongly flavored tea, isn't it Richard? Did you get it at CC? I'm running out of what I bought there on my first trip and need more.

Anyway, I just made a pot of Ceylon Sultane.

Yes, Jeff, Irish Breakfast is hearty, but it was given to me and I am not sure where it came from. Not sure if TCC has an Irish Breakfast, but they have a good English Breakfast you may like - similar to the Irish Breakfast blends, but with a hint of smoke. You may also want to try an Earl Grey for a strong flavor - they have several.

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This is my second brewing of Brodie's Scottish Teatime, a smoother blend than most breakfast blends, and one the people at British Emporium recommended as an afternoon tea. The first time I was not sure if I liked it or what I thought of it. Today I like it better. Just one more example of liking a tea more (or less) as you get to know it.

Also brewed gongfu style one of the Oolong teas in my last shipment from jingtea.com. A Wuyi Seasonal Da Hong Pao. This is an inexpensive Da Hong Pao, but certainly a good one for every day drinking. 15" rinse, 30 " rest, 1: 20", 2: 15", 3: 20", 4: 30", 5: 45", 6: 60", 7:90". The leaves had more infusions left, but I ran out of time.

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Hello- I had a bamboo pu'erh.Interesting, but it is not a tea I would drink regularly.


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Is the Ito-en green tea a Sencha, Erin? What is a standard cup?

I think it's a sencha - I can't read the kanji except to read that it's tea. I say "standard" because it was a box of the cheapest tea you can buy at the supermarket. :blush:

It was one of the last bags, though, I think I'm going to pick up some nicer stuff at the depaichika today.

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Right now, 2005 Spring Wuyi Yen Cha "Shui Xian".

Brewed it 2 tsp. and 6 oz. 195 F water. Steep for 3 and a half minutes.

This oolong is close to the black teas I typically drink. Makes it "familiar" to me. Beyond that, it's hard to say more. I do think I can get a few steepings out of this. The leaves are in large pieces, and only opened up a bit during the first steep.


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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this am i am enjoying mariage freres "marco polo"

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Hello- I find myself drinking either the bulk green I get at my local Chaldean market, or a sencha from a Japanese market.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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