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Richard Kilgore

What Tea Are You Drinking Today? (Part 1)

600 posts in this topic

Today in my cup first it's a Chinese red tea - Dian Hong Imperiale from The Cultured Cup. I brewed it in a large 8 - 9 ounce Yixing Teapot that just emerged from a three day seasoning in the same tea leaves. About 1 1/2 teaspoon. 10 second rinse. First infusion about 7 minutes. More to come.

Amazingly little initial astringency for such a long infusion. Somewhat woodsy aroma (but not quite like that of Puer to my nose), medium body, mild and pleasant fruity taste, very mild pleasant astringency in the after-taste which trails fruit, too.

The three day seasoning seems to have added something to the experience compared to before it was done. But this was also a longer than usual first infusion, so I'll need to experiment a bit to see.

So what's in your teacup today?

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Today in my cup first it's a Chinese red tea - Dian Hong Imperiale from The Cultured Cup. I brewed it in a large 8 - 9 ounce Yixing Teapot that just emerged from a three day seasoning in the same tea leaves. About 1 1/2 teaspoon. 10 second rinse. First infusion about 7 minutes. More to come.

Amazingly little initial astringency for such a long infusion. Somewhat woodsy aroma (but not quite like that of Puer to my nose), medium body, mild and pleasant fruity taste, very mild pleasant astringency in the after-taste which trails fruit, too.

The three day seasoning seems to have added something to the experience compared to before it was done. But this was also a longer than usual first infusion, so I'll need to experiment a bit to see.

So what's in your teacup today?

Just a follow up note - this tea went five infusions before I gave up. Less aroma and flavor, of course, but still good. I think it could go one more. The last infusion was for 10 minutes. No astringency. Lingering after-taste.

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this morning i enjoyed 2008 Pin-Lin Bao Zhong from www.houdeasianart.com

i brewed tea( 1 tbl) in a small yixing teapot for 3minutes-the second steep was for 5 minutes-

beautiful floral aroma and taste

my favorite teas are the green oolongs and bao-zhongs

joanne

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I am rather new to all these varieties of tea.  It is wonderful to read all your logs about this.  Last night I was drinking a Tisane brewed for 10 minutes in my Bodum Assam tea press; this morning however I am drinking Yunnan - Golden Extra Fancy Long Leaf Supreme from www.zoomdweebies.com  .  Our tea supplies are rather limited here, so I found this website and have been ordering my loose leaf teas ever since.  Is it wrong that I enjoy flavored black teas as well? I like vastly different teas, however,  I intend to begin to experiment with some of the teas I am finding mentioned here.  Thank you all for your logs ~ I am learning from you.

Welcome to the eGullet Society and the eG Forums!

What kind of tisane did you brew last night?

No such thing as "wrong" when it comes to tea. It's what you enjoy. Most people in the US start out drinking black teas, flavored or not. And there are traditional flavored black teas such as Earl Gray that have a huge following. An issue with flavored teas of any type has to do with the tea leaf used, because many flavored teas use low grade bitter teas because they know the added flavor will cover it up to some extent.

Let us know about the teas you are exploring, what you are drinking each day and any questions you may have about teas or equipment. Someone here is likely to have an answer...or at least an opinion.

Well, this is good to know. I drink tea at least three times a day and more if the weather is chilly. *But* I know very little about tea. My primary sources are from tea bags, my garden and hot water as provided by my bottled water spigot. Not the best resources, I realize.

I love perfumed, flowery, subtle, woodsy, smokey, bright, intense, etc. Really, I haven't met a tea or tisane that I didn't like, though some of the smoked ones presented a lovely challenge.

Earl Grey was my first love. Black, a bit acidic, masculine/feminine..the scent somehow made me...curious. Some folks say that while they can't stand the taste of coffee the aroma of it does funny things to them. This is like that, except I adore the flavor of black tea and bergamot.

I mostly drink peppermint (spearmint is too sweet), jasmine green, orange spice black, Earl Grey by Stash/Twinings, Rooibos, chamomile/lavender, honeysuckle (not as good as it sounds)...I'm obviously in need of suggestions. And maybe even a link or two to a website that can provide me with great tea since I live in a fairly remote area.


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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why not try using loose leaf tea-purchase teeli or any other brand of tea filter-

u will be surprised how easy it is to prepare your tea of choice

joanne

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Today I decided to start with what I refer to as "Asian Grocery Store Gold." It is a decent Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong that cost me a whopping $6.99 for 100 grams vacuum sealed in a metal tin. The company who packages the tea is "Good Young Co., Ltd." out of Taipei, and is marketed as the Tradition Oolong Tea Series. The English description on the can promised a "leisurely and carefree mood at any time." I couldn't resist such marketing, so I bought it and feel like I finally got my money's worth out of a grocery store bought tea. I'd post a picture, but I haven't figured that out on here yet...

It is a typical Taiwanese ball-shaped oolong with little to no roasting. I steeped it gongfu style in a Gaiwan, and got three decent steepings out of it. Moderately sweet, tastes a little flat or not super fresh, but it does have that Taiwanese Oolong flavor that I love. Not bad for $6.99.

Has anyone else found good values like this in their local markets?


Greg

www.norbutea.com

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Today I decided to start with what I refer to as "Asian Grocery Store Gold."  It is a decent Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong that cost me a whopping $6.99 for 100 grams vacuum sealed in a metal tin.  The company who packages the tea is "Good Young Co., Ltd." out of Taipei, and is marketed as the Tradition Oolong Tea Series.  The English description on the can promised a "leisurely and carefree mood at any time."  I couldn't resist such marketing, so I bought it and feel like I finally got my money's worth out of a grocery store bought tea.  I'd post a picture, but I haven't figured that out on here yet...

It is a typical Taiwanese ball-shaped oolong with little to no roasting.  I steeped it gongfu style in a Gaiwan, and got three decent steepings out of it.  Moderately sweet, tastes a little flat or not super fresh, but it does have that Taiwanese Oolong flavor that I love.  Not bad for $6.99.

Has anyone else found good values like this in their local markets?

That's good to hear. I have looked at the tea aisle in a few small Asian markets recently and did not find anything that persuaded me to take the risk. I'll look for your find next time in the larger markets.

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This afternoon I have been drinking a 2007 Spring FengHuan Lin-Tou DanCong "Mi Lan", which came as a free sample with an order from Hou De Fine Tea. Brewed Western style in a large Yixing teapot and held in a 200 ml Yixing pot. 5.0 mg leaf to 200 mg water. Ten second rinse. First infusion - 5 minutes. Second - 4.5 minutes. More to go.

Floral aroma, honey taste and after taste. A wonderful DanCong. I think they are sold out of this and just using it for small free samples with orders, but I haven't been able to load their site right now to confirm that. If I am mistaken, I'll post.

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Today I am drinking this 2008 Nan Jian Tulin * 803 Ripe Pu-erh tea tuo * 500g from Yunnan Sourcing. Brewed Western style for about 3 minutes first infusion, it is more drinkable than most first year cooked puers I have had and has a sweet after taste. No offensive off flavors or aromas. This is very inexpensive Shu Puer, so I may want to get another tong. Should be even better in a couple of years.

I did not measure the amount of Pu used, just scattered some in the bottom of a large (about 10 ounce, 300ml) Yixing pot some of the tuo I had chipped a few days ago. Next time I'll measure and report back.

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what is western syle brewing?

"Western style" just refers to using less tea leaf for a fixed amount of water for a longer brewing time, in contrast to, for example, Chinese gongfu style brewing with a higher leaf to water ratio in a small pot or gaiwan.

For example,

Western style - one teaspoon ( 2.5 g) per 8 ounces water for 4 - 5 minutes for one to two...maybe three infusions.

Gongfu style - 5 - 6 g per 90 - 120 ml water for short infusions of 5, 10 15, 20, 30, 45, 60 seconds, etc. or 20, 15, 20, 20, 30, 40, 50, seonds, etc. for 10 to 20 infusions.

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Today it's a a Shui Xian Oolong from TCC. Brewed Western style in Monk's Hat Yixing tea pot (photo in the "Show us your teaware! topic).

3 g leaf to 180 ml water, 195 F, for 3 minutes first and second infusions. Neglected to do a quick rinse before the first infusion and am sure it would have made a little difference. I can tell it should offer at least two more infusions. I like it.

So, what's in your teacup today?

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Today I have been drinking a raw Puer from puershop.com - their 2007 Premium Mengku Arbor Pu-erh Tea Brick. Eye-balled what I think was about 5 g in about 180 ml (6 ounces), pre-heated mug and infuser, boiling water for 1.5 minutes, first and second infusions. May be able to get several more out of it, but at least two more.

This is a very pleasant young sheng puer. No off-tastes, not any complexity of course, but a little sweet after-taste. I think the key for me is not over-brewing it.

So, what's in your teacup today?

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today i am drinking ba xian dancong which i purchased after poetry reading at cha ma gu dao teashop(south silk road tea)

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Today I decided to start with what I refer to as "Asian Grocery Store Gold."  It is a decent Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong that cost me a whopping $6.99 for 100 grams vacuum sealed in a metal tin.  The company who packages the tea is "Good Young Co., Ltd." out of Taipei, and is marketed as the Tradition Oolong Tea Series.  The English description on the can promised a "leisurely and carefree mood at any time."  I couldn't resist such marketing, so I bought it and feel like I finally got my money's worth out of a grocery store bought tea.  I'd post a picture, but I haven't figured that out on here yet...

It is a typical Taiwanese ball-shaped oolong with little to no roasting.  I steeped it gongfu style in a Gaiwan, and got three decent steepings out of it.  Moderately sweet, tastes a little flat or not super fresh, but it does have that Taiwanese Oolong flavor that I love.  Not bad for $6.99.

Has anyone else found good values like this in their local markets?

Greg emailed me the name of the market where he found this Dong Ding Oolong. It took me a while to find it -- three aisles of various teas and herbal/medicinal teas and it was tucked back in a hard to reach corner -- but persistance paid off. Now marked $7.99, and still a bargain. I also found one lonely tin of another tea that looked promising, but have not brewed it yet.

Greg is right. This tea is worth looking for.

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Today my first try of a 2008 Yi Wu Mountain Bamboo Raw Pu-Erh. This is from Norbu, the new tea import enterprise of eG Society member Greg Glancy. (In the interests of full disclosure, I have known Greg for two or three years, having first met him at a Cultured Cup T-Bar meeting in Dallas where he gave a presentation on his travels in the tea growing regions of China and Tibet. No financial interest in Norbu on my part.) Greg threw in this free 10 g sample of the Bamboo Pu with my order.

This is a very easy to drink young sheng (raw) pu-ehr. I brewed it gongfu style, with a 10 second rinse and so far two infusions: 1- 10 sec, 2- 20 sec. The first was more astringent than the second. Sweet, with a pleasantly sweet and astringent after-taste. This may be a drink now or in the next few years sheng. It doesn't have the oomph that would suggest great aging potential.

So what's in your tea cup today?

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I got in a 2008 Darjeeling Castleton Estate 2nd Flush (wiry) from TeaSource last week, so it's in my cup today. I really like Darjeelings and this one is terrific. The dry aroma of the leaves alone is worth the price of admission. Gorgeous wet leaves. A little astringency, medium-light bodied, fruity (but not a fruit bomb).

The wiry nature of the leaves makes it difficut to eye-ball amount, so I measured out 2.5 g per 120 ml (4 ounces) of water. Brewed western style at about 208 F for 2 minutes on the first infusion. I'll increase that to 3 minutes on the second.

This 2008 is a little different than the one from 2007 I had a few days ago. I'll have to do a side-by-side comparison with the two of them.

Any other Darjeeling lovers here?

So, what's in your teacup today?

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Tonight I am drinking a Mariage Freres Metis, an herbal, flavored South African tisane from The Cultured Cup. I have not had this tea in a couple of years and like it better now. Perhaps Mariage Freres has changed the blend subtly. Or maybe it's me. Don't know, but it is pleasant and relaxing.

So what's in your tea cup today?

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Had a cup of Lapsong Souchong from TenRen Tea: http://tenrentea.com this morning. Yikes! Good tea, but a little too smokey for me this morning. :blink:

It would be great with a smoked brisquet or pulled pork or charcoal grilled burgers.

Now drinking a pleasant Shui Xian Oolong from TCC, but the smokiness lingers.

So, what are you drinking today? Tea, that is....

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What's everyone drinking today?

I started out with my first cup ever of PG Tips and don't understand why people like it so much. It appears to be leaves broken into tiny bits, which = bitter. Maybe "strong" is a euphemism for bitter.

What is it about PG Tips that keeps you PG Tips drinkers coming back for more? How do you brew it; maybe I'm not brewing it well.

Now I am drinking an Oolong from Hue De.: the 2008 Spring "Natural Harvest" WuDong FengHuang DanCong. Brewed Western style, 2.5 g/120 ml (4 ou). Strong floral aroma and taste with honey following and in the after taste. That was the 1st two infusions, more to go. I have been getting at least 4 infusions out of this western style. Delicious!

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The Nahorhabi FTGFOP1 Assam that I mentioned in the purveyor thread. (I think Upton has a couple of Nahorhabi teas on offer, the designation is to distinguish this one.)

It's one of the tippier Assams I've encountered, has a somewhat lighter flavor & more floral aroma than most of them. It's a very refreshing morning tea.


Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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Today my son and I went to the tuna cutting at Matsuwa Market in Edgewater, New Jersey-The cutting will be repeated on Sunday at noon and 3 p.m. The market is one of the largest in Northern New Jersey-

The fish,vegetables, etc are fresh and probably best in the area. Many ppl from NYC area come to the market to purchase their fish, etc.

We bought some of the fresh cut tuna and made our own hand rolls-

I bought a can of green teen and jasmine for my beverage-i don't remember the name of the company-

The tuna weighed 520 pounds and was caught somewhere near Barcelona-

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