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Richard Kilgore

What Tea Are You Drinking Today? (Part 1)

600 posts in this topic

Tell us what tea(s) you're drinking today, and whatever else might be of interest to everyone --- how you brewed, overall impression, aroma-taste-mouthfeel, source. As impressionistic or detailed as you like.

For me today it's a ripe (Shu) Puer: 2003 CNNP "Yellow Mark" label tea cake. Sourced directly from China through Yunan Sourcing LLC on eBay.

Not gong fu style today, but rather 5 grams in about 150 ml in a Yixing tea pot for 5 minutes for convenience sake. With about five years of age on it, this ripe Puer is smooth, no astringency, moderately full-bodied without off-tastes, pleasant but rather unidemensional. I have been able to get about 4 infusions out of this previously.

I'll do this gong fu another day and report on it.

What's in your tea cup today?

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iam drinking today 2008 spring li-shan "da yu ling" soft stem oolong

from www.houdeasianart.com

they have some of the finest tea-

i have not been able to find a puehr that i enjoy since the teas i like best r green oolongs.

joanne

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Tell us what tea(s) you're drinking today, and whatever else might be of interest to everyone --- how you brewed, overall impression, aroma-taste-mouthfeel, source. As impressionistic or detailed as you like.

...

What's in your tea cup today?

OK, but dont laugh. I am actually a pu-erh guy myself as well, if you doubt me go to my website at www.pu-erh.net

But... today I am drinking a Jasmine Dragon Pearl, also from Yunnan Sourcing.

I put a pinch, about 6g, in a 120ml gaiwan, water at about 180F or a little less, first steep 1.5 - 2 minutes, 2nd steep 30 seconds, 3rd steep 2-3 minutes, 4th steep 4 minutes.

I am getting a solid 4 steeps out of this tea, the 2nd and 3rd being the best. While not the best Jasmine I have ever had, it is certainly quite acceptable. The Jasmine notes are not as pronounced as some others I have had, but still the sweetness is there with a very slight astringency coming from the green tea base. Any bitter notes are confined to the first steep, the 2nd and 3rd have a medium Jasmine aroma and a nice sweetness, while the 4th is more subtle with the green tea notes prevailing.

I do like Jasmine scented tea as an afternoon or desert tea, I find the fragrance and flavor rather soothing. My favorite style of Jasmine is using a Yin Zhen Silver Needle white tea base. Makes fantastic iced tea.


__________

Mike Petro

My hobby website:

Pu-erh, A Westerner's Quest

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iam drinking  today 2008 spring li-shan "da yu ling" soft stem oolong

from www.houdeasianart.com

they have some of the finest tea-

i have not been able to find a puehr that i enjoy since the teas i like best r green oolongs.

joanne

Thanks joanne. How did you brew the da yu ling? Hou De has a very good reputation. I would be interested in your comments on any other of his teas as you drink them.

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Tell us what tea(s) you're drinking today, and whatever else might be of interest to everyone --- how you brewed, overall impression, aroma-taste-mouthfeel, source. As impressionistic or detailed as you like.

...

What's in your tea cup today?

OK, but dont laugh. I am actually a pu-erh guy myself as well, if you doubt me go to my website at www.pu-erh.net

But... today I am drinking a Jasmine Dragon Pearl, also from Yunnan Sourcing.

I put a pinch, about 6g, in a 120ml gaiwan, water at about 180F or a little less, first steep 1.5 - 2 minutes, 2nd steep 30 seconds, 3rd steep 2-3 minutes, 4th steep 4 minutes.

I am getting a solid 4 steeps out of this tea, the 2nd and 3rd being the best. While not the best Jasmine I have ever had, it is certainly quite acceptable. The Jasmine notes are not as pronounced as some others I have had, but still the sweetness is there with a very slight astringency coming from the green tea base. Any bitter notes are confined to the first steep, the 2nd and 3rd have a medium Jasmine aroma and a nice sweetness, while the 4th is more subtle with the green tea notes prevailing.

I do like Jasmine scented tea as an afternoon or desert tea, I find the fragrance and flavor rather soothing. My favorite style of Jasmine is using a Yin Zhen Silver Needle white tea base. Makes fantastic iced tea.

Thanks, Mike. I usually avoid flavored teas, but may have to try a sample of that. Would you time the steeps the same next time, or alter them a bit?

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Tell us what tea(s) you're drinking today, and whatever else might be of interest to everyone --- how you brewed, overall impression, aroma-taste-mouthfeel, source. As impressionistic or detailed as you like.

...

What's in your tea cup today?

OK, but dont laugh. I am actually a pu-erh guy myself as well, if you doubt me go to my website at www.pu-erh.net

But... today I am drinking a Jasmine Dragon Pearl, also from Yunnan Sourcing.

I put a pinch, about 6g, in a 120ml gaiwan, water at about 180F or a little less, first steep 1.5 - 2 minutes, 2nd steep 30 seconds, 3rd steep 2-3 minutes, 4th steep 4 minutes.

I am getting a solid 4 steeps out of this tea, the 2nd and 3rd being the best. While not the best Jasmine I have ever had, it is certainly quite acceptable. The Jasmine notes are not as pronounced as some others I have had, but still the sweetness is there with a very slight astringency coming from the green tea base. Any bitter notes are confined to the first steep, the 2nd and 3rd have a medium Jasmine aroma and a nice sweetness, while the 4th is more subtle with the green tea notes prevailing.

I do like Jasmine scented tea as an afternoon or desert tea, I find the fragrance and flavor rather soothing. My favorite style of Jasmine is using a Yin Zhen Silver Needle white tea base. Makes fantastic iced tea.

Thanks, Mike. I usually avoid flavored teas, but may have to try a sample of that. Would you time the steeps the same next time, or alter them a bit?

I might shorten the first steep or try a little cooler water. I understand many do not like flavored teas, thats why I said "dont laugh", but I actually do like Jasmine and a good quality Earl Grey ("Eastern Shore" brand for example). Of course I also like Lapsang Souchong, and puerhs that have been stuffed into bamboo canes, dont care for the Pomelo stuffed puerhs though. Most puerhs with flower petals are mediocre as well, even the ones with puerh flowers. I do love the bamboo sheng puerhs as long as the cane was not over-roasted. I have some nice pictures of the tribes making the stuff, and the time that the canes are left over the fire is very inconsistent.


__________

Mike Petro

My hobby website:

Pu-erh, A Westerner's Quest

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Amazing! I walked into my favorite chinese teahouse on Thursday. It seems everyone was trying a new yerba mate (does that count as tea????). I thought it tasted more like bark than grass, that is not a bad thing (really).


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Amazing! I walked into my favorite chinese teahouse on Thursday.  It seems everyone was trying a new yerba mate (does that count as tea????). I thought it tasted more like bark than grass, that is not a bad thing (really).

It's an herbal "tea" - different plant.

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Today I am drinking a 2007 Winter FengHuang WuDong Old Bush DanCong "Huang Jing" from Hou De Fine Tea. The dry leaves are wonderfully aromatic and huge. I brewed this European style - 5 grams to 240 ml water in a Yixing teapot. First infusion 5 minutes and second infusion for 4 1/2 minutes. Both delicious. Can't say enough good about this DanCong. I may try a third and fourth infusion and then use a fifth to season the pot further.

I'll do this gongfu style on another day and try to take the time to get some pics of the gorgeous dry and wet leaves.

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i prepare the oolong -modified gongfu style-

the leaves were tightly rolled and after steep the leaves opened-whole large green leaves with little or no stems-

i used glassteapot,teapither,and cup

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i prepare the oolong -modified gongfu style-

the leaves were tightly rolled and after steep the leaves opened-whole large green leaves with little or no stems-

i used glassteapot,teapither,and cup

Can you tell us more about your modified gungfu style, jpr54?

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This morning's cup is a Keemun Mao Feng "Hair Peak", a black tea from the Anhui Province of China, from The Cultured Cup.

Brewed 2.5 grams in about 180 ml (6 ounces) of water at 208 F. An initial mild astringency softened as the tea cooled. Medium body, floral, honey notes.

Like many tea purveyors TCC brewing directions are only very loose guidelines. They say one teaspoon to 6 - 8 ounces of water...my 2.5 grams would be closer to at least two teaspoons. While a very nice cup of tea as I brewed it, next time I may want to go to slightly more leaf.

So what's in your cup today?

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Today it's a Mid-90's Aged Feng Huang DanCong from Hou De Fine Tea for me. (Click on the "large image" link on that page - it has several images of dry tea leaves, wet leaves and tea in a cup. Mine looks exactly the same.) This is a hand-harvested Oolong from WuDong, Feng Huang county, Guang Dong, China.

Brewed Western style in a Yixing pot and using a second Yixing pot to hold the brewed tea. (Done that way to season the second one further.) First infusion: 5' @ 195 F in 210 ml water. Second infusion: 4.5' @ 195 in 250 ml (a little weaker than I intended).

Interesting tea, with both floral and critus/fruity notes. Very smooth and clean, a little astingency on first infusion, reduced on the second, both very good for my taste buds. A subtler tea than the DanCong I mentioned a few days ago. I'll have to play with the brewing parameters a bit and do it gong fu style, too.

So...what's in your cup today?

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I am drinking this oolong tea from Teace, in Berkeley. It's the Monkey Picked Tikuanyin, medium roast.

It's really light, but really floral. I love the aroma, but the taste is rather light.

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Today I am drinking a new to me tea from Harney & Sons, Assam Golden Tips.

Like other black teas from this region, I brew it in 195 degrees F. filtered water for 2 minutes on the first infusion, 3-5 minutes on the second infusion. Have not tried a third infusion.

It has a bright and winey flavor, slightly sweet and I get a bit of a chestnut residual flavor on the finish.

I am a fan of the Assam and Nilgiri region teas and this is one of the best yet. Not cheap but certainly worth it to me.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Yesterday had a cup of Darjeeling Castleton 2nd Flush from 2007 at The Cultured Cup. We got two infusions out of it. I'll try the 2008 1st flush another time.

This morning it was the Keemun Mao Feng "Hair Peak" again. No weighing, just eye-balled it and brewed it a cup with infuser in about 208F water - 5 minutes first infusion and 4.5 minutes second infusion.

So what's in your cup today?

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Dilmah single origin Ceylon tea (Ceylon Supreme blend)

I use tea bags for convenience and brew it for 5 minutes in the cup, covered. The colour is a rich amber with a smoky first sip and ends with a smooth finish. Light tones of honey are present. Tastes best without the addition of any sweetners.

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Today I am drinking a 2007 Winter FengHuang WuDong Old Bush DanCong "Huang Jing" from Hou De Fine Tea. The dry leaves are wonderfully aromatic and huge. I brewed this European style - 5 grams to 240 ml water in a Yixing teapot. First  infusion 5 minutes and second infusion for 4 1/2 minutes. Both delicious. Can't say enough good about this DanCong. I may try a third and fourth infusion and then use a fifth to season the pot further.

I'll do this gongfu style on another day and try to take the time to get some pics of the gorgeous dry and wet leaves.

Gongfu style with this DanCong today. 2.5 grams in 90 ml Yixing teapot. I have done multiple infusions, So far: 10" rinse, 1st - 20", 2nd - 15", 3rd - 20", 4th - 30", 5th - 40" and still has more left to go. Light, floral, sweet. Good, but next time I think I'll try increasing the amount of leaf a little since the wet leaf did not quite fill the whole pot.

So what's in your teacup today?

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Another Keemun Mao Feng "Hair Peak" morning for me. Cup with infuser. Didn't weigh it today, but about 2.5 grams in about 7-8 ounces (240 ml) of off boil water for 5 minutes first infusion and 7 minutes second infusion. Tasty, but my hair's not peaking yet. Wonder how many cups you have to drink to get that effect?

So what's in your cup today?

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Today I am drinking a new to me tea from Harney & Sons,  Assam Golden Tips.

Like other black teas from this region, I brew it in 195 degrees F. filtered water for 2 minutes on the first infusion, 3-5 minutes on the second infusion.  Have not tried a third infusion.

It has a bright and winey flavor, slightly sweet and I get a bit of a chestnut residual flavor on the finish.

I am a fan of the Assam and Nilgiri region teas and this is one of the best yet.  Not cheap but certainly worth it to me.

Do your other teas from Assam and Nilgiri also come from Harney & Sons, or somewhere else? I have not had a Nilgiri, but it's on my list to try.

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I made a pitcher of iced Hibiscus tea yesterday and have been drinking that up til now today.

Just started a gongfu session with a 1998 Lin Cong CNNP Green Wrapper Raw Pu-erh from Yunnan Sourcing. 125 ml Yixing tea pot, 6 grams tea leaf, 20 second rinse, 10 second first infusion. Very pleasant, little astringency, and a little sweetness to it. I'll be interested to see how many infusions it will go and how it will develop.

Edited to note that I did over 10 infusions (lost count) and it still had more left in it.

So what's in your tea cup today?


Edited by Richard Kilgore (log)

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Today I am doing gongfu style a Wuyi Oolong from jingteashop.com in China. It's a Traditional Rou Gui. Brewed the free 5.2 g sample they sent me with an order in a 100 ml Yixing pot with 10 seond rinse and 1st infusion of 20 seconds, 2nd for 15 seconds. More to go. Beautiful amber-orange liquor, floral-honey taste, the aroma I am having a difficult time describing - but pleasant. No astringency on the first, and only a little in the honey after taste on the second. Very nice - wish they were not sold out of it.

So what's in your cup today?

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I am rather new to all these varieties of tea. It is wonderful to read all your logs about this. Last night I was drinking a Tisane brewed for 10 minutes in my Bodum Assam tea press; this morning however I am drinking Yunnan - Golden Extra Fancy Long Leaf Supreme from www.zoomdweebies.com . Our tea supplies are rather limited here, so I found this website and have been ordering my loose leaf teas ever since. Is it wrong that I enjoy flavored black teas as well? I like vastly different teas, however, I intend to begin to experiment with some of the teas I am finding mentioned here. Thank you all for your logs ~ I am learning from you.

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I am rather new to all these varieties of tea.  It is wonderful to read all your logs about this.  Last night I was drinking a Tisane brewed for 10 minutes in my Bodum Assam tea press; this morning however I am drinking Yunnan - Golden Extra Fancy Long Leaf Supreme from www.zoomdweebies.com  .  Our tea supplies are rather limited here, so I found this website and have been ordering my loose leaf teas ever since.  Is it wrong that I enjoy flavored black teas as well? I like vastly different teas, however,  I intend to begin to experiment with some of the teas I am finding mentioned here.  Thank you all for your logs ~ I am learning from you.

Welcome to the eGullet Society and the eG Forums!

What kind of tisane did you brew last night?

No such thing as "wrong" when it comes to tea. It's what you enjoy. Most people in the US start out drinking black teas, flavored or not. And there are traditional flavored black teas such as Earl Gray that have a huge following. An issue with flavored teas of any type has to do with the tea leaf used, because many flavored teas use low grade bitter teas because they know the added flavor will cover it up to some extent.

Let us know about the teas you are exploring, what you are drinking each day and any questions you may have about teas or equipment. Someone here is likely to have an answer...or at least an opinion.

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For my first tea today I am drinking "Richard's Three Mountain Blend", a personal blend of one Sri Lankan (Ceylon) tea and two Chinese teas, that Kyle at The Cultured Cup created for me last year. Brewed simply in a cup with infuser, one teaspoon to about 8 ounces H2O for 5 minutes, second infusion for about 4 1/2 minutes. I still like it a lot.

So what's in your tea cup today?

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