Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Classical from front to back


Infinity2134
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm not a professional chef, so my opinions may be useless to you. I own 'Scoff, and like Ranhoffer's "Epicurean" it's a masterpiece of classical cookery. Have both of them on your reference shelves, but, trust me, even opening one of them is so intimidating that you'll wish you'd gone to hairdressing school.

Why cook through one book? Why not flitter through , say, Kellar's "Bouchon", any of Rick Bayless's cookbooks (all brilliant and useful) Marcella Hazan's ouevre, and why not: Julia Child. As St. Anthony of Manhattan has written: "Her recipes work."

Point, Ducasse -- sure. Go for it. I'm a crazy Francophile too, but you'll need a break.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the suggestions. I kind of want to start from the beginning. Im kind of crazy like that. I want to start from the absolute start. Kind of like making sure you watch the first season of a show so your not lost when you start with season two.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you specifically thinking classic French? What about classic Italian? I have oft dreamt of cooking through Bugialli's The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, if only because his tone cracks me up (he is quite certain that he is infallible), and it really starts from basics. I'll never do it because I can't bear the thought of sticking exclusively to one book, but still, the idea intrigues me. And it seems the popular thing to do these days...

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or Barbara Tropp's first book if Chinese.

But, hell, if you want the full-on experience, just do Escoffier. Guide to Modern Cookery has a few thousand recipes; at a dish a day that should keep you busy and well-larded for a decade or so.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Though some may scoff, consider "A Treasury of Great Recipes" by Vincent and Mary Price. It was published in 1965. The subtitle is "Famous Recipes of The World's Foremost Kitchens."

It is a collection of recipes from many of the leading restaurants of the day - mostly Europe and the US and includes their menus. It is one of my all-time favorite cookbooks with some great recipes including an incredible chicken, apple and dill salad that uses whipped cream in lieu of mayonnaise.

It would be both a challenge and fun to cook through.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a professional chef that is going to have a lot more time on my hands when it slows down through the winter season. I want to get a classical book to cook all the way through. I was thinking a Esscofier or Point book. Any suggestions?

I think that with Escoffier you will need more then one winter or even ten. Is language an issue? There are some interesting classic and regional French cookbooks that came out in the 1920-30s.

One suggestion would be "La Bonne Cuisine du Perigord" (1929) by La Mazille. Published by Flammarion, copies can still be found and it is still considered the book on Périgord cooking. The Prix la Mazille is still the award given for the best cookbook in French.

Edited by Adam Balic (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Though some may scoff, consider "A Treasury of Great Recipes" by Vincent and Mary Price.  It was published in 1965.  The subtitle is "Famous Recipes of The World's Foremost Kitchens."

That Vincent Price, Holly? Let me run to the Google...

Wow, yeah: that Vincent Price. Master of horror and gourmet chef; truly a Renaissance man!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the suggestions. I kind of want to start from the beginning. Im kind of crazy like that. I want to start from the absolute start. Kind of like making sure you watch the first season of a show so your not lost when you start with season two.

"The absolute start" and "the beginning".... hmmm...

Maybe this ? :huh:

:biggrin:

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Such great ideas! I have studied in Italy for a while so I was more leaning to the French side so I can round out my training better. :biggrin: I saw that there is a translation of Point's cookbook that is coming out soon. Anyone know more details on that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want a more recent book to work through, you could try Stephane Reynaud's new book "Rippailles."

His previous cookbook "Pork & Sons" won the Grand Prix de la Gastronomie Francaise. In this book, he delves into the roots of French cuisine, which appears to be what you are after.

The Amazon link to the book is http://www.amazon.com/Ripailles-Stephane-R...24023750&sr=1-1

On a more traditional front, how about Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking ( http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/037...4198763-7282459 ) or Elizabeth David's French Provincial Cooking ( http://www.amazon.com/FRENCH-PROVINCIAL-CO...24036178&sr=1-3 )

Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the suggestions. I kind of want to start from the beginning. Im kind of crazy like that. I want to start from the absolute start. Kind of like making sure you watch the first season of a show so your not lost when you start with season two.

"The absolute start" and "the beginning".... hmmm...

Maybe this ? :huh:

:biggrin:

To quote Carl Sagan, "If you want to bake an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...