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Cooking testicles


Magictofu
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I just found this article about a new ebook on testicle cookery. From the little I have seen, it looks like a beatiful book with nice pictures and even includes video!

I do not have easy access to the raw material needed for the recipes included in the book but did eat a variety of testicles while visiting China a few years ago. One testicle dish I sampled there still rank in my top 10 best dishes ever tasted. I did, however, feel a bit weird when I first approached the dish... this is not something I was used to eat and I could not help thinking about my own reproductive organs while taking the first bite... fortunately it was very good and was able to simply enjoy what I was eating after a few bites.

Now that I think of it, I have the feeling that few people in the west eat testicles. With the exception of "prairie oysters", I can't think of any dish featuring them.

Does anyone knows how to obtain testicles in North America without people thinking that you are some kind of weirdo? And if so, how would you cook these? The book seems like a good way to start but testicle pizza is not exactly my stuff.

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I just found this article about a new ebook on testicle cookery. From the little I have seen, it looks like a beatiful book with nice pictures and even includes video!

I do not have easy access to the raw material needed for the recipes included in the book but did eat a variety of testicles while visiting China a few years ago. One testicle dish I sampled there still rank in my top 10 best dishes ever tasted. I did, however, feel a bit weird when I first approached the dish... this is not something I was used to eat and I could not help thinking about my own reproductive organs while taking the first bite... fortunately it was very good and was able to simply enjoy what I was eating after a few bites.

Now that I think of it, I have the feeling that few people in the west eat testicles. With the exception of "prairie oysters", I can't think of any dish featuring them.

Does anyone knows how to obtain testicles in North America without people thinking that you are some kind of weirdo? And if so, how would you cook these? The book seems like a good way to start but testicle pizza is not exactly my stuff.

Out here in cowboy country, they're called "calf fries." Sometimes "mountain oysters". PM me if you're really serious about this, and I'll see if I can find a source for you.

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My market gets lamb fries from time to time. I've never bought a pair (they always come in pairs, how 'bout that?) nor have I ever seen them on a menu or at somebody's place for dinner. I don't need a dedicated cookbook but I will give them a try one of these days . . .

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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When as a kid working the summers on my Uncles farm we would castrate a bunch of pigs the testicles would be dipped in flour and fried in bacon grease. Tasted like tender chicken gizzards which I don't like either.

I do remember the squeal of the pigs. Funny, it did not change at all as you cut them and stopped instantly when you set them back down. I guess it really must not have hurt them.

Robert

Seattle

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I've cooked turkey fries before. What surprised me most - although I guess it shouldn't - was the difference in size among them. Some of them were about 2.5cm but others were 7cm! I guess one would be from a 10# turkey and the other would be from one that weighs 25 pounds?

I thought they were delicious, though.

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I've cooked turkey fries before. What surprised me most - although I guess it shouldn't - was the difference in size among them. Some of them were about 2.5cm but others were 7cm! I guess one would be from a 10# turkey and the other would be from one that weighs 25 pounds?

I thought they were delicious, though.

I think that size has more to do with how close it is to breeding season when the birds are butchered. The age of the bird also is a factor.

Here is South Dakota, "calf fries" are seasonal. The small, local papers advertise events (called "feeds" or "frys") around the time calves are being castrated.

I think about recipes for testes when I butcher my own poultry, but somehow they always end up as a treat for the farm cats instead. I keep chickening out. . .

April

One cantaloupe is ripe and lush/Another's green, another's mush/I'd buy a lot more cantaloupe/ If I possessed a fluoroscope. Ogden Nash

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Out here in cowboy country, they're called "calf fries."  Sometimes "mountain oysters".  PM me if you're really serious about this, and I'll see if I can find a source for you.

Even if you were able to find me a supplier, I don't think I can easily import them to Canada. Thanks for the offer though.

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When as a kid working the summers on my Uncles farm we would castrate a bunch of pigs the testicles would be dipped in flour and fried in bacon grease.  Tasted like tender chicken gizzards which I don't like either.

I do remember the squeal of the pigs.  Funny, it did not change at all as you cut them and stopped instantly when you set them back down.  I guess it really must not have hurt them.

I am not sure I'd go that far to get some on my table. I understand that it is normal procedure on farms and that it contributes to the animals well being over the long term but I think it would get in the way of appreciating whatever dish I could prepare with them.

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My market gets lamb fries from time to time. I've never bought a pair (they always come in pairs, how 'bout that?) nor have I ever seen them on a menu or at somebody's place for dinner. I don't need a dedicated cookbook but I will give them a try one of these days . . .

That's interesting. This and what other posters mentioned means it is not as difficult as I thought to find testes on the market... I am probably just way too shy to ask for some at the butcher shop... I guess I should send someone else buy them! :biggrin:

It is interesting to see that local culinary traditions involving testicles seems linked to strong local cattle raising activities. It just makes sense when you think of it though.

So far, after reading a few recipes available on the web I figured out that there are three main approaches to cooking testicles:

1) fried in batter

2) simply pan fried

3) cooked in sauce

From what I remember, the texture and taste resemble a cross between kidney and liver which suggests that one could probably adapt recipes for kidneys or liver to testicles... any comments on that?

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My restaurant just got in a bag of these guys, and they're pretty intimidating. I think we might soak them in milk to draw some of the blood out, and then treat them like sweetbreads. We have never cooked them before, so the sweetbread approach (soak, boil, clean, slice, and pan fry) is something we hope will work. They have been in our freezer for a while, but I will update once we cook them. We also just got in some sort of penis, I think a bison, it is called a pizzar (something like that). So if anybody has any suggestions for cooking these please let me know.

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My restaurant just got in a bag of these guys, and they're pretty intimidating.  I think we might soak them in milk to draw some of the blood out, and then treat them like sweetbreads.  We have never cooked them before, so the sweetbread approach (soak, boil, clean, slice, and pan fry) is something we hope will work.  They have been in our freezer for a while, but I will update once we cook them.  We also just got in some sort of penis, I think a bison, it is called a pizzar (something like that).  So if anybody has any suggestions for cooking these please let me know.

I think if I had to eat an animal nose to tail, the penis would the very last part.

I always soak organ meat -- probably more than I really need to. Getting the blood out, yes, but also to remove whatever fluids that may linger depending on the organ. It's critical for kidneys -- the "off odor" is nasty.

The only place I've seen penises for sale is at the pet store. They're brown, stiff and leathery and intended to be dog toys called "pizzlers" or something like that. There's also somebody who makes walking canes out of them, they're four feet long with a glans handle. Not everyone can pull off an accessory like that.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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My restaurant just got in a bag of these guys, and they're pretty intimidating.  I think we might soak them in milk to draw some of the blood out, and then treat them like sweetbreads.  We have never cooked them before, so the sweetbread approach (soak, boil, clean, slice, and pan fry) is something we hope will work.  They have been in our freezer for a while, but I will update once we cook them.  We also just got in some sort of penis, I think a bison, it is called a pizzar (something like that).  So if anybody has any suggestions for cooking these please let me know.

I think if I had to eat an animal nose to tail, the penis would the very last part.

I always soak organ meat -- probably more than I really need to. Getting the blood out, yes, but also to remove whatever fluids that may linger depending on the organ. It's critical for kidneys -- the "off odor" is nasty.

The only place I've seen penises for sale is at the pet store. They're brown, stiff and leathery and intended to be dog toys called "pizzlers" or something like that. There's also somebody who makes walking canes out of them, they're four feet long with a glans handle. Not everyone can pull off an accessory like that.

yeah that sounds right. The meat purveyor told us that they are usually used for canes and dog toys

Edited by meicjos41 (log)
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  • 1 year later...

My market gets lamb fries from time to time. I've never bought a pair (they always come in pairs, how 'bout that?) nor have I ever seen them on a menu or at somebody's place for dinner. I don't need a dedicated cookbook but I will give them a try one of these days . . .

Two and a half years later and I finally took the plunge. I poached them until almost cooked through, peeled them, sliced them, then soaked them in diluted vinegar and lemon juice. Pat them dry, dust with seasoned flour and bread crumbs, shallow fry until golden, then serve with various toppings: plum sauce, mint jelly and cranberry. Salt, pepper and rosemary.

They have a mild lamb taste with a texture like thymus sweetbreads. They're quite delicate once the outer layer comes off so the coating and frying must be done carefully. The crunchy gold crust helps a lot. The low pH soak seemed to draw out some raw-looking juices, although maybe milk would work too.

Two thumbs up. I don't feel extra virile.

101_4215.jpg

101_4220.jpg

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I've only eaten turkey and chicken fries. I read instructions that they need to be peeled but these are covered with a very thin membrane that was very difficult to peel so I left it on and it didn't seem to detract from the quality of the dish. I thought the texture was similar to brains - very soft, delicate and somewhat creamy. They'd probably be very good in a classic brain dish - pan-fried and served with beurre noisette with capers.

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Hello Peter,

Those joules are pretty cheap:)

Your presentation looks fantastic. For me I would prefer a more rustic (peasant-ish) preparation. Skewer and grill or dice and fry with salt and pepper then crack a couple of eggs in there. Serve with Pita (or tortillas) and some Arak.

I gotta get some.

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Hello Peter,

Those joules are pretty cheap:)

Your presentation looks fantastic. For me I would prefer a more rustic (peasant-ish) preparation. Skewer and grill or dice and fry with salt and pepper then crack a couple of eggs in there. Serve with Pita (or tortillas) and some Arak.

I gotta get some.

There was some subterfuge involved with this presentation. My dinner guest was boasting how well she can distinguish different meats and proteins, so this was a case of "guess what's in the amuse". Funny you should mention eggs -- once peeled, these cojones were the exact size and shape of medium chicken eggs.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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they seem like quite a bargain! Not sure I'd jump at them, but then, I'm on a quest to eat each part, so...

And if you're too shy to just ask for them, put on a long trench coat, a hat, sunglasses and ask them to pack them in a brown paper bag :biggrin:

I'm looking forward to some intestinal dinners when we're back in Bavaria this summer!

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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  • 1 month later...

I just run across this thread.

In Argentina "criadilla" is a delicacy cooked

on the BBQ.

Calf balls are cooked whole just with the skin off.

Bull's are marinated for several hours in vinegar

and water, cut in half and put on the grill.

Is a link to a Flckr picture where you can see the balls

in the middle.

As for the original poster question:

there is in Ottawa any Argentine meat market?

You can ask them and nobody will wonder about

your question.

I have not such problem in Toronto.

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  • 1 month later...

I was looking at fry recipes just recently, after talking with a local lamb producer about what sort of variety meats he could supply to me. The book I was reading was Variety Meats, 1982, from the Time-Life "The Good Cook" series. (Richard Olney, series editor, ISBN 0-8094-2950-0)

Because that book came from a Time-Life series, there were a zillion copies sold, although I'd guess that the average buyer of this volume would have been pretty terrified about what they had just bought; in any event, there are lots of them available cheap, although it's a terrific book, and not dumbed-down in the slightest. There's a recipe chapter titled "Sweetbreads, Brains, and Fries." In addition, in the first (technique) half of the book, there is a short photo-demonstration of the initial prep, which consists of carefully slitting through the tough 3-layered outer membranes, peeling them off, and then doing a 6 minute poach, followed by a cold-water shock, rinsing, draining, and drying to hold them until the final treatment. There are 8 recipes specifically for fries, but the book suggests that any of the white variety meats can be substituted one for another, so there are a lot of good starting points beyond the "slice, dredge, and fry" recipe.

By the way, has anyone tried pork fries? I ask because I love lamb and veal kidneys, but I find pork kidneys too strong-tasting for many recipes which work well for the first two. I wonder if there's a similar story for the frys...

Paul

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By the way, has anyone tried pork fries?

I think most males are castrated within the first week of life, so these fries would be very small. The few times we've bought piglets to raise ourselves, they've always been sows. I don't think our Co-Op even sells barrows.

I found some large pork fries for sale (click). $4.52 per pound, and it's sold as pet food. :wacko:

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Thanks, Peter. As Bette Davis sung:

They're either too young, or too old,

They're either too gray or too grassy green,

The pickings are poor and the crop is lean...

By the way, some years ago, I saw one of the canes you referred to earlier, in a brocante in Paris. The level of craftsmanship was patently high, being fitted with an engraved silver band below the handle. I think you're right: not everyone can pull off an accessory like that. But when you find a really good one, it's hard to beat!

Paul

Edited by PaulDWeiss (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...

In 18th century France, testicles were called (as they still are in some places) "animelles". They were an item on 18th century model meal for which I dug up the corresponding recipes (self-published as Après Moi, Le Dessert: A French Eighteenth Century Model Meal). Here is part of the entry for that item:

Ways to prepare Animelles

Cut the Animelles in pieces, four or eight, take off the skin,

put on a little grated salt, flour them, put them in hot frying fat,

& they should be very crunchy when you take them out. Serve

hot as an entremets.

Another way

Soak flour in beer or wine; add in a half glass of oil & of salt.

The Animelles being half-fried, put them in this dough, put them

immediately back in the frying fat. Once they are fried, garnish

them with fried parsley. Serve hot.

Third way

Marinate the Animelles with slices of onion, parsley, pepper,

clove, vinegar, a little bouillon, cut as usual. Put them in beaten

eggs, bread them. Fry them, and serve with fried parsley.

Dictionnaire des alimens, vins et liqueurs, 1750 (I:84)

The menu pairs these with (cheese) ramekins. If you like the preparation but quail at the content, scallops might work nicely, no?

Jim Chevallier

http://www.chezjim.com

Austrian, yes; queen, no:

August Zang and the French Croissant: How Viennoiserie came to France

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