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slkinsey

Luxardo Sangue Morlacco

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I thought this could use its own thread. Luxardo describes Sangue Morlacco as:

Luxardo's second historical speciality after Maraschino Originale. It is a liqueur of marasca cherries (a sour cherry variety exclusively cultivated by Luxardo) - a variant of cherry brandy. It is obtained by the infusion of fermented marasca juice, matured for two years in oak vats. Luxardo cherry liqueur was renamed with the curious name of Sangue Morlacco (Morlacco blood) by the poet Gabriele D'Annunzio in 1919, at the time of the Fiume military expedition, due to its dark red colour (furthermore, the name "Morlacco" is derived from the name of a proud people of the Dalmatian hinterland).
Also picked up a bottle of Sangue Morlacco which, besides having a really cool name, seems promising.

Have you had a chance to try the Sangue Morlacco yet, and how do you think it compares to Cherry Heering?

I ask because this weekend is the maiden Singapore Grand Prix, and as a rabid food/cocktails/Formula 1 fan I always try to match a meal and/or beverage to the race venue. A Singapore Sling seems appropriate, especially given that one section of the street course runs right down Raffles Blvd.

I've only tasted about a half-ounce of Sangue Morlacco, late last night after a long flight. My initial impression is that it tastes like the liqueur version of Luxardo Cherries. If you've ever had Luxardo Cherries, they're awesome.

I haven't tasted it alongside Cherry Heering, so I can't make much of a comparison as yet. Perhaps I'll try that this evening. Any ideas as to a good cocktail to evaluate differences among cherry brandies?


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I like the High Hat:

1.5 oz (or 2) Rye

.5 oz Cherry brandy

.5 oz lemon

shake/strain/up

The Move Over is also nice:

1.5 oz gin

.5 oz Dry vermouth

.25 oz sweet vermouth

.25 oz cherry brandy

dash Angostura

stir/strain/up, twist.

I initially discovered both of these via The Gumbo Pages' cocktail page which also has many other interesting recipes.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I just picked up a bottle over lunch, and gave it a quick taste. I think Sam got it exactly right above - it tastes just like boozy version of the Luxardo cherries in syrup. I'll definitely give it a try tonight, perhaps first in a Gilroy.


Edited by jmfangio (log)

"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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I tried it in a Gilroy. 1 oz Junipero; 1 oz Sangue Morlacco; 1/2 oz Noilly Pratt dry; 1/2 fresh lemon; 1 dash orange bitters.

Good drink, but not revelatory. And it doesn't allow the liqueur a chance to shine. I find that the winey-ness of the vermouth interferes with the full expression of the cherry flavor. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, but it makes the Gilroy a less than satisfactory drink for showing off Sangue Morlacco.


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OK, so I went with an Elephants Sometimes Forget. Same ingredients as the Gilroy, just different proportions - 1 oz Tanquerey, 3/4 oz Santue Morlacco, 3/4 oz lemon juice, 1/4 oz Noilly Prat dry, 1 dash Angostura orange. Nice, not mind blowing, but something I'd make again. Sort of like a grown up cherry popsicle.

ETA: I was typing while sipping, and suddenly had the idea to add a dash of Maraschino. Now that's MUCH better.


Edited by jmfangio (log)

"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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I tried it in a Gilroy.  1 oz Junipero; 1 oz Sangue Morlacco; 1/2 oz Noilly Pratt dry; 1/2 fresh lemon; 1 dash orange bitters.

Good drink, but not revelatory.  And it doesn't allow the liqueur a chance to shine.  I find that the winey-ness of the vermouth interferes with the full expression of the cherry flavor.  Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, but it makes the Gilroy a less than satisfactory drink for showing off Sangue Morlacco.

so i come across new liqueurs every day but what does it take so show something off well that is supposedly special? do you need to find a drink that uses alot of it or should it be a drink where everything else is super familiar?

the gilroy uses alot of liqueur but would something familiar like whiskey, spoonful of the liqueur, and bitters show it off better? is simpler flavor contrast the key?


Edited by bostonapothecary (log)

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Is this the best cherry liqueur, or should I buy Cherry Heering instead?

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