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Heirloom Beans by Rancho Gordo (Steve_Sando)


NancyH
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40 minutes ago, Steve R. said:

An entire row (6 or so varieties) at my local, less-than-gourmet, Key Food.  

 

Cool. Which ones do they carry?

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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4 hours ago, Alex said:

 

Cool. Which ones do they carry?

 

You comin’ to Brooklyn?  I’ll check.

As an aside, is everyone aware that there isn’t a bean emoji?  Do I have to join a “bean emoji club”?

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1 hour ago, Steve R. said:

 

You comin’ to Brooklyn?  I’ll check.

As an aside, is everyone aware that there isn’t a bean emoji?  Do I have to join a “bean emoji club”?

 

Just curious, thanks; no big thing. I was in Brooklyn in May and I'll be in Queens (my home town) in December, but buying RG isn't on my agenda.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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1 hour ago, Alex said:

 

Just curious, thanks; no big thing. I was in Brooklyn in May and I'll be in Queens (my home town) in December, but buying RG isn't on my agenda.

I knew that... just prodding a little.   If you're interested, when you're in NYC, let me know & we'll do drinks or dinner.  Did you go anywhere worth mentioning in Brooklyn when you were here?

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  • 1 month later...
21 hours ago, TdeV said:

I'm not a subscriber to the SF Chronicle, and can't find a way to get to that article, which has a subscription logo pasted on it whether I approach it from their home page, or direct from the link. Any chance you could make a pdf and share it? I do think it's interesting and probably relevant to this thread. Or, can someone tell me how to get there without subscribing to the SF paper?

gayle28607

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22 hours ago, TdeV said:

 

It's a more appropriate posting than the the ones listing the contents of the RG monthly subscription contents.

 

This is after all, in the cookbooks section.

Edited by dans (log)
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On 9/16/2021 at 1:52 PM, TdeV said:

 

So, I can't post the whole article titled "How Rancho Gordo changed the way eight Bay Area restaurants serve beans" written by Elena Kadvany, a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Here's the intro:

 

Two decades after Steve Sando started Rancho Gordo in Napa, the cult hit company has changed the way Bay Area restaurants and diners treat the humble bean. Chefs have been serving its heirloom legumes for years, from classic refried pintos with tacos to caviar-topped beans. Sando has played a critical role in educating locals on the difference between standard canned beans and heirloom versions, many chefs said.
While canned beans often sit on grocery store shelves for years, Rancho Gordo beans are less than 2 years old and are sourced directly from small farms in Mexico, California and Europe. These bean varieties span a much broader spectrum than anything in a can, from delicate and creamy white beans to nutty garbanzos and meaty runner beans. Chefs praise their unrivaled taste and texture — and Rancho Gordo’s dedication to careful sourcing — for changing the bean game.
In turn, Sando credits local chefs with helping spread the bean gospel long before it was trendy. Restaurants now make up 30% of Rancho Gordo’s overall sales.
Here are eight Bay Area restaurants that serve the heirloom beans and their chefs on how the beans transformed their dishes.

The restaurants are:

  • The French Laundry, Yountville
  • Kin Khao, Nari, San Francisco
  • Californios, San Francisco
  • Luna Mexican Kitchen, San Jose, Campbell
  • Otra, Son’s Addition, San Francisco
  • The Anchovy Bar, State Bird Provisions, San Francisco
  • Maxine Siu, Plow, San Francisco

There's a great photo of a dish at each restaurant, and some discussion about why Rancho Gordo beans are so swell.

 

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