Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Restaurants Missing Michelin Stars


Food Snob
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

Last week I was at One-O-One.

The food was very good - interesting combinations; good flavours; imaginative, but well thought out dishes - and service excellent.

There were a couple of slips in execution, but nonetheless, this restaurant is as good as other 1* London restaurants I have tried and is probably due a star.

How do others feel about One-O-One?

Are there any other deserving restaurants that have been overlooked by Michelin?

Or even 1*s that ought to be 2*s?

Food Snob

Edited by Food Snob (log)

Food Snob

foodsnob@hotmail.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why so covetous of a Michelin™ star on behalf this restaurant? Surely if you are happy with the food and service then that should be enough. Tell your family and your friends first. Then tell us here on the forum which you have! Tell us more of the dishes that you had please, what did you like best?

Personally I don’t think any restaurants are missing Michelin™ stars, they’re not like toilets or front doors; they can and should operate successfully without them! AA Gill lays it out bare, the folly of those who aspire for starry trinkets, in his Sunday Times restaurant review this week. I’ve never eaten in a 2* or 3* place not because of some inverse working-class snobbery but for the very reasons in that review. I have eaten in a few 1* restaurants and on the whole they have been very enjoyable experiences. (Though not much choice here in Birmingham in that respect, Simpson’s has one and Purnell’s probably deserves one by all unknown criteria that these things are measured by). But it seems to me that more stars means exponentially less enjoyment and more head scratching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alimentum - consistent, beautiful cooking, mostly works. If Arbutus and Wild Honey have a star, Alimentum should too.

But I'm not sure whether I want them to have a star. In a selfish way, if they don't have one, it means I can actually get a table and afford the bill. Plus it goes against their ethos of friendly approachableness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve never eaten in a 2* or 3* place not because of some inverse working-class snobbery but for the very reasons in that review.  I have eaten in a few 1* restaurants and on the whole they have been very enjoyable experiences.  (Though not much choice here in Birmingham in that respect, Simpson’s has one and Purnell’s probably deserves one by all unknown criteria that these things are measured by).  But it seems to me that more stars means exponentially less enjoyment and more head scratching.

I couldn't disagree more! The reasons in this article which you agree to are a clear over-simplification of the matter as not every 2* or 3* is like the other. The statement might be true for some old-fashioned gourmet temple, but not all for the modern ones like Can Roca, Amador or Le Calandre to name just a few. So give yourself a go and experience and get rid of your stupid prejudices. Three star food can be so enjoyable, mindblowing, thought-provoking then you can never think of. One star can also do that but mostly at lesser quality level and less often so...

The article is also making some weird statements about Germans which I hope do not understand... And the guy did not try any of the German three stars as his statement about the expectation is planly wrong.

Edited by IFS (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not especially covetous, just using One-O-One as a basis with which to start this discussion really.

We can debate all day long whether Michelin starring is good or bad, but at the end of the day, people care about them and chefs care about them. It's only natural to want to compare different restaurants and Michelin stars are one of the lesser of several evils with which one can do this.

Personally, the meals I have eaten at starred restaurants (in Western Europe, at least) have been better than those at unstarred ones; and the best restaurant I have ever eaten at was a 3*. Of course I have had some terrible experiences at 1 and 2* places, but I still believe it is a useful factor in helping (not deciding) where to eat.

Wrt One-O-One, I also brought up the topic of Michelin stardom because of the chef's public statement that he would like one. However, focusing on my meal...what did I like best? Well, the foie gras was amazingly well-cooked and still lingers on my mind. It was probably the second best foie I have ever eaten (after Le Gavroche). The langoustine accompanying it was also very impressive. That dish sticks out because of the quality and simple excellent cooking of the ingredients.

The halibut dish was very tasty because of the combination of ingredients in addtion to their quality.

The desserts too are memorable (but I am quite a dessert fiend). They both worked on several levels: temp, taste, texture and came together very well. It always makes such a difference to end the meal on a high, so I was left very satisfied....

Food Snob

p.s. sorry about rushed reply, but in rather a hurry

Food Snob

foodsnob@hotmail.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alimentum - consistent, beautiful cooking, mostly works. If Arbutus and Wild Honey have a star, Alimentum should too.

On that basis, there are a gazillion places that deserve a star if one compares them with the likes of Hakkasan. Just my opinion, of course!

Cheers, Howard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the review, the foie gras and langoustine combo in particular sounds interesting. Strange how the chef has made a public statement about his Michelin dreams though. As it begs the question about his main motivations; though as you say we can debate this till the cows come home. Just wanted to stir the pot a little. Remember that they are great restaurants with *s and not because they have *s that they are great restaurants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alimentum - consistent, beautiful cooking, mostly works. If Arbutus and Wild Honey have a star, Alimentum should too.

On that basis, there are a gazillion places that deserve a star if one compares them with the likes of Hakkasan. Just my opinion, of course!

Cheers, Howard

But I would disagree - Hakkasan serves Chinese food. Alimentum serves Mediterranean (really, nouvelle cuisine/british), similar to what Arbutus and Wild Honey do. There are gazillions of gastropubs serving that kind of cooking, but Arbutus, Wild Honey and Alimentum all reach the higher levers, delivering superb value for money (at least ALC for the first two :hmmm: ) . I have not been to Hakkasan, but many times to Yauatcha where the chef supposedly moved, and the dumplings are (in my relatively uninformed Westerner opinion only) decidedly superior to pretty much any other Chinese restaurant, including Giles Coren's favourite Chuen Cheng Ku, whilst remaining approachable, understandable and served in a setting that can be understood by a travelling Frenchman.

In fact, if one goes by the original definition of the Guide, stars should be given to restaurants that would please a travelling tyres salesman. I.e. mostly French (and therefore familiar) cuisine, and then a few non-French places that serve their style of food in a setting and way which the conservative French guy can stomach. My French relatives, who grew up in another era, are shocked to see me eat sushi, and find baked beans absolutely revolting. They would not step inside Yauatcha nor Tamarind despite both places serving Western-friendly food, yet my dad found Alimentum to be one of the best meals he's ever had out of France.

(and now I'm turning into a walking advert for the place)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alimentum - consistent, beautiful cooking, mostly works. If Arbutus and Wild Honey have a star, Alimentum should too.

On that basis, there are a gazillion places that deserve a star if one compares them with the likes of Hakkasan. Just my opinion, of course!

But I would disagree - Hakkasan serves Chinese food.

I so promised myself that I wouldn't bite, but...

I don't have a problem with the food so much as everything else. Take the service - or the lack of it – both inside and out. From being deluged by the multitude of wannabe IT girls who want to hang your coats up, to the obscene lack of attention at the tables, that’s bad enough. But I absolutely, so totally, abhor a place that has bouncers on the door, especially those with the temerity to tell me I can't chain my push bike to a lamppost on a public footpath, but are delighted to allow the limos to park on the pavement in the very same place.

And the music – any place that needs the music turned up so loud that you can’t enjoy a conversation without shouting deserves no respect in my book. I think that says it all. If your clientele have so little to say that you have to rely on the music to make the atmosphere, then good luck to you.

For these reasons, Hakkasan is on my no-fly list unless I am taken under duress by a well meaning host.

Cheers, Howard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And the music – any place that needs the music turned up so loud that you can’t enjoy a conversation without shouting deserves no respect in my book.

Howard - couldn't agree more. The shame is that I really liked the food, and could see why it had a star. But I wouldn't return because I hated the experience....for exactly the same reasons as you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Hakkasan fan writes…

Love the place but in a very narrow context – for Dim Sum on Sundays.

For a Sunday lunch it’s easy to get a table, it does cracking Dim Sum at remarkably good value prices and the place is quiet enough to actually get some reasonable service; also it misses out on the loud music. All of which means that you can relax and enjoy the bouncers, IT girls and the rest for what they are: pure theatre. The vicarious ‘chill’ that comes from getting to eat somewhere where the staff and room resemble a scene from Kill Bill Vol.1.

Wouldn’t touch it of an evening.

Actually, that’s a bit of a lie. Of an evening, it’s also useful for serving a reasonably well-made drink only a few short yards from the estimable Kikuchi – where you can eat genuinely top-notch sushi for a fair whack but still substantially less than H.

(Think the Korean place next to Kikuchi in Hanway St has also been revamped not so long ago. Haven’t eaten there in ages (keep meaning to but ending up just going to K again, instead) but I remember it as being pretty good.)

Gareth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not my cup of tea but Aiden Byrne is a bloody good cook, maybe michelin get scared and run for the door the moment they set eyes on the room!

apparently all at pearl are completely bemused as to why they have no star. i haven't been but from all accounts it sounds like firm one star cooking

Matt Christmas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

on the subject of Hakkasan and music and atmosphere etc etc, it would be interesting to know how far you could push the boundries of comfortable eating whilst still serving michelin worthy food and gaining a star. could you serve it in a greasy spoon and get a star, in a night club with hard house thumping all around, in a strip club? i am not sure if michelin really know and just seem to pick and choose

Matt Christmas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

on the subject of Hakkasan and music and atmosphere etc etc, it would be interesting to know how far you could push the boundries of comfortable eating whilst still serving michelin worthy food and gaining a star.  could you serve it in a greasy spoon and get a star, in a night club with hard house thumping all around, in a strip club?  i am not sure if michelin really know and just seem to pick and choose

Well every year I am miffed that Michelin never pay the kitchen in my house a visit. For years now I have been serving consistent cuisine, using the best ingredients, with both classic and modern techniques. Although I double up as front of house, service is excellent. The guests that dine there rarely complain and I have had some amazing feedback. I think the fact that Michelin do not visit my kitchen, shows a real bias.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

on the subject of Hakkasan and music and atmosphere etc etc, it would be interesting to know how far you could push the boundries of comfortable eating whilst still serving michelin worthy food and gaining a star.  could you serve it in a greasy spoon and get a star, in a night club with hard house thumping all around, in a strip club?  i am not sure if michelin really know and just seem to pick and choose

Well every year I am miffed that Michelin never pay the kitchen in my house a visit. For years now I have been serving consistent cuisine, using the best ingredients, with both classic and modern techniques. Although I double up as front of house, service is excellent. The guests that dine there rarely complain and I have had some amazing feedback. I think the fact that Michelin do not visit my kitchen, shows a real bias.

can i get a table tonight for 4 at 8 pm please, i would like the tasting menu :raz:

Matt Christmas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why does everyone want to book at 8!!! I have a table at 6.30 to vacate at 7.30 (Coronation street is on) or 10pm vacating at 10.45pm (last orders in local). Tasting menus only available 4 weeks in advance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

could you serve it in a greasy spoon and get a star, in a night club with hard house thumping all around, in a strip club?

I once, in the course of duty, had dinner at Stringfellows. It was better than at several Mich-recognised places I could mention (and will: Mirabelle, Rhodes 24, One Lombard Street).

Also, while the staff looked very similar to those in Hakkasan, they were much friendlier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

could you serve it in a greasy spoon and get a star, in a night club with hard house thumping all around, in a strip club?

I once, in the course of duty, had dinner at Stringfellows. It was better than at several Mich-recognised places I could mention (and will: Mirabelle, Rhodes 24, One Lombard Street).

Also, while the staff looked very similar to those in Hakkasan, they were much friendlier.

Sort of the breast of both worlds...Lapdancing followed by fine dining, it's the future :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...