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Menu/meal planning for two


CDRFloppingham
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I cook for two every day and here's an example of what I've done.

I'll buy b/s chicken breast on sale and freeze some for future use. What I don't grill, broil, bake or poach I grind. I then make a batch a Mexican-flavored meat for tacos, burritos, enchiladas (which can be frozen) or nachos. I'll make a large batch of meatballs with sauce which can be eaten with noodles for two nights as supper and the rest frozen in two-meal containers. Meatloaf is eaten for a couple evenings and used as sandwiches. Hamburgers are always welcome for a quick meal, too.

My Kitchen Aid grinder attachment was one of the best gifts to my household ever. :smile:

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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I cook for two every day and here's an example of what I've done.

I'll buy b/s chicken breast on sale and freeze some for future use. What I don't grill, broil, bake or poach I grind. I then make a batch a Mexican-flavored meat for tacos, burritos, enchiladas (which can be frozen) or nachos. I'll make a large batch of meatballs with sauce which can be eaten with noodles for two nights as supper and the rest frozen in two-meal containers. Meatloaf is eaten for a couple evenings and used as sandwiches. Hamburgers are always welcome for a quick meal, too.

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What / how do add to make the flavors, chili powder, cumin, what else?? sounds good and something my husband would like and we have to make another Costco run soon...

T

Live and learn. Die and get food. That's the Southern way.

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I cook for two every day and here's an example of what I've done.

I'll buy b/s chicken breast on sale and freeze some for future use. What I don't grill, broil, bake or poach I grind. I then make a batch a Mexican-flavored meat for tacos, burritos, enchiladas (which can be frozen) or nachos. I'll make a large batch of meatballs with sauce which can be eaten with noodles for two nights as supper and the rest frozen in two-meal containers. Meatloaf is eaten for a couple evenings and used as sandwiches. Hamburgers are always welcome for a quick meal, too.

-----

What / how do add to make the flavors, chili powder, cumin, what else??  sounds good and something my husband would like and we have to make another Costco run soon...

T

I season the meat with salt and pepper and brown over fairly high heat. Since chicken breast is so lean I add as much oil as I need to create a bit of a fond, usually a little under one tablespoon for 1.5 lbs. of meat. Remove meat from pan. Add chopped bell peppers, onions, garlic and jalapeno. If I have a tomato that's too soft for sandwiches or salad I'll add it to the vegetables. Saute on medium-high heat for a few minutes, add a teaspoon of oil *then* add the spices to bloom the flavors- usually chili powder (the mild kind) and cumin. Sometimes I'll also use pasilla, ancho or arbol powders or even a pinch of Mexican oregano. After a few minutes of "blooming" return the meat with accumulated juices to the pan, reduce heat to medium low and cook until everything *just* begins to stick a bit to the pan. This method really creates as much flavor as possible from ground chicken breast. I find that using an ample amount of chopped vegetables (or diced if I want a finer texture) not only adds flavor and nutrition but helps keep the meat moist.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Current "strategy" is to shop frequently at small shops & market stalls, purchasing only what is needed for 2-3 days. No shopping at warehouse stores (costco, sam's) except for disposables. We almost always cook extra portions of boneless proteins (chicken breasts, salmon), potatoes or rice. Neither of us takes lunch to work (I work from home).

When we plan to cook a "batch" dish (i.e., stocks, tomato ragu or soup) I freeze in plastic zip bags in 1 or 2-cup portions. Flatten the bag to excise the air bubble, freeze in a cake pan... voila, an envelope-shaped packet which takes very little space in the freezer.

Important note: label everything with name and date. Remember to rotate stock.

Important note 2: even lettuce can be used in soup. I recall assembling all the green vegs from the crisper, poaching in chicken stock, puree, season & serve. Fresh, green, tasty... swirl a little heavy cream on top, if you must.

Karen Dar Woon

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I'm in the same position - cooking for 2. One thing that has really helped me recently is dried goods. Lentils, rice, beans (90 minute beans). You cook a bit of extra, next night do a little lentil salad with vinaigrette and some fish, add stock for soup with left over chicken, re-heat that left over pot roast in the lentils. Its easy to throw some kale or chard in. They are very forgiving, cheap, and really tasty.

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