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Savora: a new (for me) opportunity: how to use it?


John Talbott
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Like apercubes, which somehow escaped my eagle-eyes for 55 years, I've never (knowingly) had Savora. My poor, long but acutely suffering French-born French teacher (what does one do with a highly motivated but impossibly challenged student?) asked me to bring her back some, so I thought I'd best taste it first - so that like the great Kings's tasters, I, not my patient, funny and wonderful professor would perish.

We are having Maistre Mathieu's best chicken tonight; may/should/can I serve it with the bird?

And either if so or not - with what else?

John Talbott

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Savora is a special mustard-based condiment created by Amora in 1899. It is rarely called a mustard because it does have a taste of its own. It contains honey, malt vinegar, garlic, celery and spices (turmeric, cinnamon, nutmeg, cayenne, cloves, tarragon). It can be served as a condiment like mustard, or rather like a chutney or relish. It is also a cooking ingredient and is lovely in marinades (for grilled meats). It can be added to sauces and vinaigrettes. I find that quite a few chefs like it and use it in many different ways.

Just eat a small spoonful of it and I'm sure you'll find out how to use it...

Edited by Ptipois (log)
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Savora is a special mustard-based condiment created by Amora in 1899. It is rarely called a mustard because it does have a taste of its own. It contains honey, malt vinegar, garlic, celery and spices (turmeric, cinnamon, nutmeg, cayenne, cloves, tarragon). It can be served as a condiment like mustard, or rather like a chutney or relish. It is also a cooking ingredient and is lovely in marinades (for grilled meats). It can be added to sauces and vinaigrettes. I find that quite a few chefs like it and use it in many different ways.

Just eat a small spoonful of it and I'm sure you'll find out how to use it...

Thank you Pti, that's very useful; we had it with the chicken and I loved it; not mustard but a genuinely diferent condiment (for me.)

John Talbott

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  • 2 weeks later...

I made a vinaigrette with about 2 parts Savora to one part olive oil, one part cider vinegar, and served that over arugula with some lovage and chives tossed in. As an accompaniment to aligot it was awesome. I think it's a particularly good match to arugula, and I'll be trying that again in other incarnations.

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