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fischmart

Troy Michigan

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Will be arriving with my wife Friday afternoon and leaving Sunday. Mostly interested in lunch Friday and Saturday breakfast and lunch. Would prefer a local business and not a chain.

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There are tons of restaurants in that area (e.g., in or within 5 miles of Troy). Could you give us a general idea of the kind of cuisine or restaurant (other than locally owned) you'd prefer and how far (minutes, not miles) you'd be willing to drive?

BTW, there's an "upscale" shopping mall in Troy, The Somerset Collection.


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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We are staying at the Somerset Inn, so anything close is best. Looking for regional "eats". I usually like to find whatever the local sandwich, hot dog or pizza place is, and a great breakfast if possible. I know there is a Capital Grille, Ruth's, Maggiano's, etc. and we have all those here in Philly.


Edited by fischmart (log)

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These are not necessarily the strongest recommendations, but, in the categories you list, near where you're staying, I might suggest:

hot dog: Hippo's Hot Dogs, 1648 Rochester Rd, Troy, MI 48083 (about 4 miles SE of where you're staying). They specialize in Chicago-style, though they have other stuff too.

pizza: hmm, I'd say Michigan leans towards deep dish. Some chains that you wouldn't have out there: Buddy's (http://www.buddyspizza.com/) and Cottage Inn (http://www.cottageinn.com/) have carryout locations in the vicinity. Green Lantern (http://www.greenlanternlounge.com/) gets some votes for good pizza (not deep dish) and they have a carryout outpost about 3 miles SE in Royal Oak, though the main restaurant is further. If you're looking for a "pizza restaurant," Shields (www.shieldspizza.com) has been around for a long time and is quite close to you. This whole category, though, has my weakest recommendations.

breakfast: I like Frittata, in Clawson, about 3 miles SE of you. But it's not your traditional bacon and eggs place.

I'm sort of stumped on sandwiches. It's not something I go out for much. I see Stage Deli (http://thestagedeli.com/) has an outpost in the mall, but I haven't been. There are lots of delis in the immediate vicinity.

You didn't mention burgers, but Red Coat Tavern is a couple miles from you. The burgers are often cited as the area's best (and I do like them) and the setting is distinctive.

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We are staying at the Somerset Inn, so anything close is best.  Looking for regional "eats".  I usually like to find whatever the local sandwich, hot dog or pizza place is, and a great breakfast if possible.  I know there is a Capital Grille, Ruth's, Maggiano's, etc. and we have all those here in Philly.

If you are looking for regional eats, you should have a coney island hot dog . The local version is so unique that there are states east of here (I have read) that refer to it as a "Michigan".There is ,I think, a National Coney Island :wub: in the Royal Oak/Clawson area. But most strip-malls have a coney place, too.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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We are staying at the Somerset Inn, so anything close is best.  Looking for regional "eats".  I usually like to find whatever the local sandwich, hot dog or pizza place is, and a great breakfast if possible.  I know there is a Capital Grille, Ruth's, Maggiano's, etc. and we have all those here in Philly.

Ah, so you're adjacent to the mall. If you go west on Big Beaver to Coolidge, south to 14 Mile, west to Greenfield, then south to almost 12 Mile (about 5 miles total -- see a map), you get to Sweet Lorraine's. Highly recommended for any and all meals. Can be crowded at peak lunch/brunch times. Turn right into the adjacent driveway and park in the back.

On 13 Mile just east of Greenfield is Fiddleheads. I've never eaten there, but several posters on the Detroit Restaurants thread like it.

If you're up for sushi, on Crooks Rd north of Long Lake Rd (about three miles from you), is Nobana, formerly Noble Fish House.


Edited by Alex (log)

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Right, I should have thought "coney island" when you mentioned hot dog. According to Wikipedia it was invented in Michigan. Coney island restaurants are all over. Many are chains. There's a Kerby's within a mile of you and a National Coney Island just over a mile. To me, our coney islands (the restaurants) are all pretty interchangeable, whether they're part of a chain or not. And honestly, coney islands (the food) are kind of disgusting, but sometimes one is strangely in a mood for one. (If you're coming from Philly, I wonder whether something like scrapple makes for a good comparison, psychologically speaking. Or cheese steak, though I'd rather have a cheese steak than a coney dog.)

But if you're going to go the route of products that originated in Michigan, I suppose you should drink Vernors and Faygo. And have fudge at Sanders (there's a parlor within 2 miles in Birmingham). And have cherry pie at Grand Traverse Pie Company (branch just over a mile away in Troy). Heck, eat Dominos and Little Caesar's pizza. I weep for Southeast Michigan. But you can probably skip these, particularly the pizza, which is lousy, and which you can get anywhere in the country. Though to be really fair, I haven't been to Sanders since I was a kid, and haven't tried the GT pie, which branch is a pretty new addition to the area. Northern Michigan is a big cherry producer. For example, if you do opt for the somewhat fancier Sweet Lorraine's or Fiddleheads suggestions, they may well have something like chicken with cherry sauce on the menu. I've had pie up-north and it's tasty enough, but I don't know how it plays in a chain format.


Edited by Leonard Kim (log)

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Right, I should have thought "coney island" when you mentioned hot dog.  According to Wikipedia it was invented in Michigan.  Coney island restaurants are all over.  Many are chains.  There's a Kerby's within a mile of you and a National Coney Island just over a mile.  To me, our coney islands (the restaurants) are all pretty interchangeable, whether they're part of a chain or not.  And honestly, coney islands (the food) are kind of disgusting, but sometimes one is strangely in a mood for one.  (If you're coming from Philly, I wonder whether something like scrapple makes for a good comparison, psychologically speaking.  Or cheese steak, though I'd rather have a cheese steak than a coney dog.)

But if you're going to go the route of products that originated in Michigan, I suppose you should drink Vernors and Faygo.  And have fudge at Sanders (there's a parlor within 2 miles in Birmingham).  And have cherry pie at Grand Traverse Pie Company (branch just over a mile away in Troy).  Heck, eat Dominos and Little Caesar's pizza.  I weep for Southeast Michigan.  But you can probably skip these, particularly the pizza, which is lousy, and which you can get anywhere in the country.  Though to be really fair, I haven't been to Sanders since I was a kid, and haven't tried the GT pie, which branch is a pretty new addition to the area.  Northern Michigan is a big cherry producer.  For example, if you do opt for the somewhat fancier Sweet Lorraine's or Fiddleheads suggestions, they may well have something like chicken with cherry sauce on the menu.  I've had pie up-north and it's tasty enough, but I don't know how it plays in a chain format.

I think the Vernors and Faygo suggestions are good ones. If you're buying Faygo, don't go for the standard cola, or any other standard flavors...you want Rock and Rye, Redpop, and perhaps a couple of others. These are what people think of when they think of Faygo. Vernors is a local institution, but it isn't what it once was. It's still pretty good, and it packs a relative whallop, if you're not used to such a thing. Nothing's better for you when you're sick.

Leonard's right about the pizza places he mentioned, but the best pizza I've ever eaten in my entire life is available in Hazel Park at Loui's Pizza, on Dequidre just north of 9 Mile Road (about 7-8 miles from your hotel, and well worth the trip). The interior is kitschy, but the pizza is simply undeniable. I lived in Chicago for three-and-a-half years and while there was good pie there, nothing touched Loui's. Nothing. It's a deep-dish type that isn't stuffed or anything, with crust to die for. If you *did* happen to die while eating it, at least you'd die happy.

Fiddleheads is good, too, as I've been there. Nice atmostphere in a place that you'll drive by without even knowing it's there. Good food. Sweet Lorraine's is consistently good as well, which is another really good suggestion. I'd recommend it for breakfast, particularly, since there are lots of other places for lunch and dinner. Frittata is also a great breakfast place, as previously mentioned. I love it there.

One place I would disagree with the recommendation of is Beverly Hills Grill. I've been unimpressed with that place, which I find to be overpriced, and kind of sketchy in their ability to prepare food correctly without overcooking. It usually has a long wait to be seated at prime times, and some of the menu choices/specials do actually sound interesting, but the actual application of said items has consistently disappointed me. For the price, it isn't worth it. I'd much rather steer you in a different direction.

Like sushi? Noble Fish in Clawson (not far from your hotel) is just plain the best sushi available in the area. I can't compare it to, say, California, but it's a great little place inside of a tiny Japanese grocery. You wouldn't know it was in there if you didn't know it was in there. That kind of place. Great, great stuff.

I'll keep thinking, too.

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Leonard's right about the pizza places he mentioned, but the best pizza I've ever eaten in my entire life is available in Hazel Park at Loui's Pizza, on Dequidre just north of 9 Mile Road (about 7-8 miles from your hotel, and well worth the trip).  The interior is kitschy, but the pizza is simply undeniable.  I lived in Chicago for three-and-a-half years and while there was good pie there, nothing touched Loui's.  Nothing.  It's a deep-dish type that isn't stuffed or anything, with crust to die for.  If you *did* happen to die while eating it, at least you'd die happy.

Fiddleheads is good, too, as I've been there.  Nice atmostphere in a place that you'll drive by without even knowing it's there.  Good food.  Sweet Lorraine's is consistently good as well, which is another really good suggestion.  I'd recommend it for breakfast, particularly, since there are lots of other places for lunch and dinner.  Frittata is also a great breakfast place, as previously mentioned.  I love it there.

One place I would disagree with the recommendation of is Beverly Hills Grill.  I've been unimpressed with that place, which I find to be overpriced, and kind of sketchy in their ability to prepare food correctly without overcooking.  It usually has a long wait to be seated at prime times, and some of the menu choices/specials do actually sound interesting, but the actual application of said items has consistently disappointed me.  For the price, it isn't worth it.  I'd much rather steer you in a different direction.

Like sushi?  Noble Fish in Clawson (not far from your hotel) is just plain the best sushi available in the area.  I can't compare it to, say, California, but it's a great little place inside of a tiny Japanese grocery.  You wouldn't know it was in there if you didn't know it was in there.  That kind of place.  Great, great stuff.

I'll keep thinking, too.

When you navigate to Noble Fish's URL, you're redirected to the one for Nobana (see my post above). I don't know if Noble is still in their little store in Clawson.

Louie's (not Loui's) is a great idea if one is in the mood for pizza. When I go to Detroitland nowadays I gravitate toward non-pizza items, so it's been a long, long time since I've been there. I seem to remember a great Loui's vs. Buddy's vs. Shield's debate. In fact, IIRC (and this is a very vague memory), wasn't Louie the chef or part owner of Shield's?


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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When you navigate to Noble Fish's URL, you're redirected to the one for Nobana (see my post above). I don't know if Noble is still in their little store in Clawson.

Louie's (not Loui's) is a great idea if one is in the mood for pizza. When I go to Detroitland nowadays I gravitate toward non-pizza items, so it's been a long, long time since I've been there. I seem to remember a great Loui's vs. Buddy's vs. Shield's debate. In fact, IIRC (and this is a very vague memory), wasn't Louie the chef or part owner of Shield's?

Sorry, Alex, but it is, in fact, Loui's, without the final "e"...they did it purposely. And yes: he was the one who gave both Shield's and Buddy's their recipes. Credit Buddy's for better overall marketing, since they've expanded the most, but their pizza is now pretty far from the way that Loui's is. Buddy's is a good "second place is the first loser" substitute when Loui's is closed for vacation or something like that, but Loui's absolutely puts out a far superior product, without a doubt. In fact, the last time I had Buddy's (at their Warren location), I was downright disappointed.

Noble is definitely still in their little grocery in Clawson. Didn't know about the URL thing, though. Is Nobana still owned/run by the Noble Fish folks?

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When you navigate to Noble Fish's URL, you're redirected to the one for Nobana (see my post above). I don't know if Noble is still in their little store in Clawson.

Louie's (not Loui's) is a great idea if one is in the mood for pizza. When I go to Detroitland nowadays I gravitate toward non-pizza items, so it's been a long, long time since I've been there. I seem to remember a great Loui's vs. Buddy's vs. Shield's debate. In fact, IIRC (and this is a very vague memory), wasn't Louie the chef or part owner of Shield's?

Sorry, Alex, but it is, in fact, Loui's, without the final "e"...they did it purposely. And yes: he was the one who gave both Shield's and Buddy's their recipes. Credit Buddy's for better overall marketing, since they've expanded the most, but their pizza is now pretty far from the way that Loui's is. Buddy's is a good "second place is the first loser" substitute when Loui's is closed for vacation or something like that, but Loui's absolutely puts out a far superior product, without a doubt. In fact, the last time I had Buddy's (at their Warren location), I was downright disappointed.

Noble is definitely still in their little grocery in Clawson. Didn't know about the URL thing, though. Is Nobana still owned/run by the Noble Fish folks?

Oops. Thanks for the check on Loui's.

The copyright notice at the bottom of Nobana's home page says "One World Market," which IIRC is under the same ownership as Noble.


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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To me, our coney islands (the restaurants) are all pretty interchangeable

this statement should be amended to say

"To me, our coney islands (the restaurants) are all pretty interchangeable, aside from LAFAYETTE CONEY ISLAND in Detroit, which is hands down the most amazing coney in existence."

For breakfast I would recommend Forte in Birmingham, and I highly recommend the new Brian Polcyn restaurant in Birmingham, Forest Grill. It can be tough to get a reservation but the bar is 1st come 1st serve and the food is excellent


Sandy Levine
The Oakland Art Novelty Company

sandy@TheOaklandFerndale.com www.TheOaklandFerndale.com

www.facebook.com/ArtNoveltyCompany twitter: @theoakland

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We are staying at the Somerset Inn, so anything close is best.  Looking for regional "eats".  I usually like to find whatever the local sandwich, hot dog or pizza place is, and a great breakfast if possible.  I know there is a Capital Grille, Ruth's, Maggiano's, etc. and we have all those here in Philly.

Ah, so you're adjacent to the mall. If you go west on Big Beaver to Coolidge, south to 14 Mile, west to Greenfield, then south to almost 12 Mile (about 5 miles total -- see a map), you get to Sweet Lorraine's. Highly recommended for any and all meals. Can be crowded at peak lunch/brunch times. Turn right into the adjacent driveway and park in the back.

On 13 Mile just east of Greenfield is Fiddleheads. I've never eaten there, but several posters on the Detroit Restaurants thread like it.

If you're up for sushi, on Crooks Rd north of Long Lake Rd (about three miles from you), is Nobana, formerly Noble Fish House.

Right, I should have thought "coney island" when you mentioned hot dog.  According to Wikipedia it was invented in Michigan.  Coney island restaurants are all over.  Many are chains.  There's a Kerby's within a mile of you and a National Coney Island just over a mile.  To me, our coney islands (the restaurants) are all pretty interchangeable, whether they're part of a chain or not.  And honestly, coney islands (the food) are kind of disgusting, but sometimes one is strangely in a mood for one.  (If you're coming from Philly, I wonder whether something like scrapple makes for a good comparison, psychologically speaking.  Or cheese steak, though I'd rather have a cheese steak than a coney dog.)

But if you're going to go the route of products that originated in Michigan, I suppose you should drink Vernors and Faygo.  And have fudge at Sanders (there's a parlor within 2 miles in Birmingham).  And have cherry pie at Grand Traverse Pie Company (branch just over a mile away in Troy).  Heck, eat Dominos and Little Caesar's pizza.  I weep for Southeast Michigan.  But you can probably skip these, particularly the pizza, which is lousy, and which you can get anywhere in the country.  Though to be really fair, I haven't been to Sanders since I was a kid, and haven't tried the GT pie, which branch is a pretty new addition to the area.  Northern Michigan is a big cherry producer.  For example, if you do opt for the somewhat fancier Sweet Lorraine's or Fiddleheads suggestions, they may well have something like chicken with cherry sauce on the menu.  I've had pie up-north and it's tasty enough, but I don't know how it plays in a chain format.

Right, I should have thought "coney island" when you mentioned hot dog.  According to Wikipedia it was invented in Michigan.  Coney island restaurants are all over.  Many are chains.  There's a Kerby's within a mile of you and a National Coney Island just over a mile.  To me, our coney islands (the restaurants) are all pretty interchangeable, whether they're part of a chain or not.  And honestly, coney islands (the food) are kind of disgusting, but sometimes one is strangely in a mood for one.  (If you're coming from Philly, I wonder whether something like scrapple makes for a good comparison, psychologically speaking.  Or cheese steak, though I'd rather have a cheese steak than a coney dog.)

But if you're going to go the route of products that originated in Michigan, I suppose you should drink Vernors and Faygo.  And have fudge at Sanders (there's a parlor within 2 miles in Birmingham).  And have cherry pie at Grand Traverse Pie Company (branch just over a mile away in Troy).  Heck, eat Dominos and Little Caesar's pizza.  I weep for Southeast Michigan.  But you can probably skip these, particularly the pizza, which is lousy, and which you can get anywhere in the country.  Though to be really fair, I haven't been to Sanders since I was a kid, and haven't tried the GT pie, which branch is a pretty new addition to the area.  Northern Michigan is a big cherry producer.  For example, if you do opt for the somewhat fancier Sweet Lorraine's or Fiddleheads suggestions, they may well have something like chicken with cherry sauce on the menu.  I've had pie up-north and it's tasty enough, but I don't know how it plays in a chain format.

I think the Vernors and Faygo suggestions are good ones. If you're buying Faygo, don't go for the standard cola, or any other standard flavors...you want Rock and Rye, Redpop, and perhaps a couple of others. These are what people think of when they think of Faygo. Vernors is a local institution, but it isn't what it once was. It's still pretty good, and it packs a relative whallop, if you're not used to such a thing. Nothing's better for you when you're sick.

Leonard's right about the pizza places he mentioned, but the best pizza I've ever eaten in my entire life is available in Hazel Park at Loui's Pizza, on Dequidre just north of 9 Mile Road (about 7-8 miles from your hotel, and well worth the trip). The interior is kitschy, but the pizza is simply undeniable. I lived in Chicago for three-and-a-half years and while there was good pie there, nothing touched Loui's. Nothing. It's a deep-dish type that isn't stuffed or anything, with crust to die for. If you *did* happen to die while eating it, at least you'd die happy.

Fiddleheads is good, too, as I've been there. Nice atmostphere in a place that you'll drive by without even knowing it's there. Good food. Sweet Lorraine's is consistently good as well, which is another really good suggestion. I'd recommend it for breakfast, particularly, since there are lots of other places for lunch and dinner. Frittata is also a great breakfast place, as previously mentioned. I love it there.

One place I would disagree with the recommendation of is Beverly Hills Grill. I've been unimpressed with that place, which I find to be overpriced, and kind of sketchy in their ability to prepare food correctly without overcooking. It usually has a long wait to be seated at prime times, and some of the menu choices/specials do actually sound interesting, but the actual application of said items has consistently disappointed me. For the price, it isn't worth it. I'd much rather steer you in a different direction.

Like sushi? Noble Fish in Clawson (not far from your hotel) is just plain the best sushi available in the area. I can't compare it to, say, California, but it's a great little place inside of a tiny Japanese grocery. You wouldn't know it was in there if you didn't know it was in there. That kind of place. Great, great stuff.

I'll keep thinking, too.

Fiddleheads is Wonderful!If they have it, get their lamb sandwitch:wub: :cool::wub::wub::wub:


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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