Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Wedging a lemon or lime


snowangel
 Share

Recommended Posts

What's the neatest and cleanest way to wedge a lemon or lime and avoid as much of that white gunk that runs the length of the lemon? (Oh, and remove as many seed as possible so the kids aren't choking on them as well as the fish bones.)

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always cut into wedges, chop off the center (white) part, and flick out the seeds with a knife or other utensil.

I do this with naval orange wedges too (not the seed part), as it makes the wedges easier to eat.

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always just done it the same way I do for drinks, cut the knobs off of each end, cut in half lengthwise, then each half lengthwise into quarters. Most of the seeds fall out, that way, and the stubborn ones are easy to flick out with the knife tip.

For drinks, after I quarter the halves, I cut each wedge in half again, it makes a nice little piece. Perfect for Corona bottles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your post got me wondering, so I went and experimented. The winner for me was first cutting the lemon in half lengthwise. Then slicing the first wedge avoiding the white center stingy thing. Then rotating and continuing to make wedges so I was left with a little core of the white thing and nice wedges that were "all lemon". Shockingly my test lemons had only one seed between them and that was flicked out as others have said with the knife tip. Do you have fresh lake fish on the menu? Hope to see the fish and lemon wedges on the dinner thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The cooking school way is to trim off both ends first, then removing the peel and pith by making curved cuts along the lenght of the fruit. Then you take the cleaned fruit in the palm of one hand hand and make slices on both sides of each membrane with the other hand. That way you get nice clean citrus "supremes".

A really sharp filleting knife is a good tool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The cooking school way is to trim off both ends first, then removing the peel and pith by making curved cuts along the lenght of the fruit. Then you take the cleaned fruit in the palm of one hand hand and make slices on both sides of each membrane with the other hand. That way you get nice clean citrus "supremes".

A really sharp filleting knife is a good tool.

This is a great method for making supremes but I think when you want to serve a wedge of lemon as accompaniment for fish then that bit of peel is necessary to provide a "clean" hold and to act as a sort of press for the juice.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't like seeds or white pith either. I leave the knobby ends on, as I find they give purchase to the wedges for squeezing. I cut them in half lengthwise, and then cut a triangular prism out of the lemon so to speak, removing the center rib of pith and most the the seeds from each half. If there are any seeds left they're usually pretty easy to scrape out. This is the best method i've come up with; if you make a clean cut with a sharp knife then you don't really use much lemon, and you end up with 8 seedlesss/pithless wedges.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...