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US Cookbooks in Italian


lcdm
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Hi - My daughter is leaving for a High School exchange later this month (she is 16). We have hosted 8 students and my favorite gifts were local cookbooks, most were in English. I was wondering if there were any American cookbooks that are translated into Italian. And if so would you think it would be good gift. If not maybe you could give me other ideas. I'm from NJ.

Thanks - Lisa

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Hi - My daughter is leaving for a High School exchange later this month (she is 16). We have hosted 8 students and my favorite gifts were local cookbooks, most were in English. I was wondering if there were any American cookbooks that are translated into Italian. And if so would you think it would be good gift. If not maybe you could give me other ideas. I'm from NJ.

Thanks - Lisa

I have never seen an American cookbook translated into Italian. In general Italians not only don't "get" American food, they are unwilling to believe there is anything worth eating on the entire North American continent, including Maine lobster. But I wouldn’t let language stop me. Most young people study English, and if they don't, they should. I'd suggest finding a cookbook that emphasizes native ingredients and that, excuse me, doesn't start its recipes with cans of condensed soup, and give it in English, perhaps with a box of wild rice or a small can of maple syrup, which is utterly divine on good Roman ricotta.

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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Try contacting some of the publishers. I do not know of any books in Italian off hand but you may look for things like James Beard (Simon Shuster) as that would be a classic book for anyone.

The other thing I would tell you is that with almost all my friends and acquaintances in Italy the one food they all talk about from America is "Jewish Deli" like pastrami on rye. Maybe a care package from Katz's? Of course the folks I know are all food nuts and all travel to NYC. It is hard to imagine many cookbooks from American chefs being very popular in Italy. Last year I travelled for a bit with a person from the California restaurant scene and she was shocked when no one heard of most the places (including French Laundry) she mentioned.

American, big, Hollywood movies are also popular with Europeans (why? I will never understand) so if you can find out if they are fans maybe load up on a few recent releases and send them. I know most DVD's cost about the same as a good cookbook these days.

David West

A.K.A. The Mushroom Man

Founder of http://finepalatefoods.com/

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American, big, Hollywood movies are also popular with Europeans (why? I will never understand) so if you can find out if they are fans maybe load up on a few recent releases and send them. I know most DVD's cost about the same as a good cookbook these days.

An interesting idea, but watch the region rating on the DVDs; many will not play on European DVD players.

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Thanks for your suggestions. I think you are right about the cookbooks.

We are hosting a student from Italy this year - her favorite "American" items are brownies and pancakes w/syrup. Maybe I'll give my daughter some mixes and she can cook for the family. Our host daughter also loves Disney movies, I'll find out if the family has a DVD or tape player (but there may be diffrences), maybe something related.

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forget the cookbooks as the Italians also don't measure with cups and tsp's. ingredients differ enough to change the results too.

I send brownie mix, lemon bar mix, See's nuts and chews chocolates, jelly bellies... etc

Food speaks!

If your daughter can teach them pancakes!

that is fun too! maybe she can bring a set of measuring cups, spoons etc. and write the recipe for them!

PS the flour here is really different, more like cake flour.

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