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The best cheese in France - Anthony? Served where?


tupac17616
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I also like cheese and dessert courses - and l'Arpege seems to be a bit weak in those categories.

Bernard Antony's comte alone makes me think I disagree with you on that. The rest of his cheeses and the well-executed classic desserts (souffle, tarte aux pommes, a beautiful looking millfeuille) make me certain that I do. :raz:

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I wonder why Robyn thinks that l'Arpège is weak on cheeses indeed. Fact is, not only does Passard have Antony's cheese, he has the very best of Antony's cheeses, which is to say the best cheeses in the world. So it's a good idea to have the actual cheese trolley and get everythnig you like + everything they recommend.

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I wonder why Robyn thinks that l'Arpège is weak on cheeses indeed. Fact is, not only does Passard have Antony's cheese, he has the very best of Antony's cheeses, which is to say the best cheeses in the world. So it's a good idea to have the actual cheese trolley and get everythnig you like + everything they recommend.

I thought I recalled that some people had mentioned those things. But - after over a week of preparing for a storm (Fay) - sitting through the storm - cleaning up after the storm - and now watching the next storm (Gustav) - I am exhausted - and certainly wouldn't trust my recollections over your experiences (or the experiences of anyone else here). Robyn

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I wonder why Robyn thinks that l'Arpège is weak on cheeses indeed. Fact is, not only does Passard have Antony's cheese, he has the very best of Antony's cheeses, which is to say the best cheeses in the world. So it's a good idea to have the actual cheese trolley and get everythnig you like + everything they recommend.

You know, my interest in L'Arpege was waning until this came up.

I am a sucker for fine cheese. This almost seals the deal.

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You know, my interest in L'Arpege was waning until this came up.

I am a sucker for fine cheese.  This almost seals the deal.

Why was your interest waning? Frankly - I am just very confused. I hear a lot about a few high end restaurants. But almost nothing about others. E.g., it's very hard to find any mention of Pre Catelan anywhere (although it was on Gridskipper earlier this year). Robyn

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I wonder why Robyn thinks that l'Arpège is weak on cheeses indeed. Fact is, not only does Passard have Antony's cheese, he has the very best of Antony's cheeses, which is to say the best cheeses in the world. So it's a good idea to have the actual cheese trolley and get everythnig you like + everything they recommend.

What makes them the best cheeses in the world? That's quite a statement.

Didn't you mean to say that these are the cheeses you enjoy the most and think are best?

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What makes them the best cheeses in the world? That's quite a statement.

Didn't you mean to say that these are the cheeses you enjoy the most and think are best?

Not at all. Just taste them. No one who has does not think they are the best ever. Anthony is a genius. I don't know what makes them the best in the world -- that guy calls himself "éleveur de fromages". He selects them and ages them, and no one matches his skills at it. Those cheeses are all wonder of balance, as strong as they should be but not too strong, full of clear and distinct flavours.

Btw, that's also where Dieter Müller's cheeses come from. And Wohlfahrt's. And so many others.

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What makes them the best cheeses in the world? That's quite a statement.

Didn't you mean to say that these are the cheeses you enjoy the most and think are best?

Not at all. Just taste them. No one who has does not think they are the best ever. Anthony is a genius. I don't know what makes them the best in the world -- that guy calls himself "éleveur de fromages". He selects them and ages them, and no one matches his skills at it. Those cheeses are all wonder of balance, as strong as they should be but not too strong, full of clear and distinct flavours.

Btw, that's also where Dieter Müller's cheeses come from. And Wohlfahrt's. And so many others.

I loved the cheese trolley at Dieter Muller - but never knew where the cheese came from. Now I know! FWIW - I like strong cheese (not a whole course of them - but at least one or two). When I mentioned this to our server - he gave me a little extra - a very small portion of the strongest cheese I have ever had - can't remember what it was - some kind of sheep's cheese. I guess maybe it was a test. If it was a test - I flunked. This cheese was too strong even for me.

Are there any other restaurants in Paris that serve cheese from Anthony that you like? Are any of his cheeses available at food stores in Paris - or are they available only through restaurants? Robyn

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Not at all. Just taste them. No one who has does not think they are the best ever. Anthony is a genius. I don't know what makes them the best in the world -- that guy calls himself "éleveur de fromages". He selects them and ages them, and no one matches his skills at it. Those cheeses are all wonder of balance, as strong as they should be but not too strong, full of clear and distinct flavours.

Btw, that's also where Dieter Müller's cheeses come from. And Wohlfahrt's. And so many others.

Hi Julot, long time since we last disagreed! Actually I agree with what you write, except that I think Anthony's aged comté is slightly better at Jean-Georges Klein's L'Arnsbourg than at L'Arpège. Maybe because Klein is only a short drive away from Anthony and never fails to give him a piece of his mind when cheeses are not at their very best.

Edited by Ptipois (log)
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That really does not count as a disagreement. The only way to be sure would be to hang out with Anthony when he sends cheeses to Passard, Ducasse, Wohlfahrt and Klein, in order to see which one gets the best ones. As you say, travel may be a factor, and more generally the fact that cheese are living ingredients and as such always changing.

Plus, you actually make my point that the best Anthony cheeses are the best cheeses ever.

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The best of Antony's comté seems to bear little resemblance to either the best of other's product nor even to some of his lesser comtés. Only because we have engaged on this thread some of the best and most articulate palates can I make this request. Would you each/all describe and compare the finest Antony comté you have enjoyed? I ask this because I have read someplace that it can not be compared in flavor and texture to other aged comtés but is rather more like ????, other dissimilar cheeses. Please, for us mortals?

eGullet member #80.

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Very aged comté is very different from younger, more common comté. Its texture is at the same time dry, melting, creamy and crumbly. Its color is a gentle straw yellow. It is better off crumbled with an oyster knife or a Parmesan knife, or shaved, than cut with a knife.

The taste also is different from that of younger comté. Full, sweet with a lot of body, and a very strong, definite nutty taste. En bouche, the texture is unmistakable, firm and melting with tiny crispy caseine grains which you also get in other aged hard cheeses like cheddar or Parmesan. After a long aging, caseine concentrates into those little grains. It is not "chalk" as some people say or even grains of sand (I've heard that).

The taste of aged comté, actually, because of its mildness and nuttiness, is closer to that of exceptional aged Parmesan or Cheddar than of unaged comté or other Jura or Alpine hard cheese. It differs from those last cheeses (Appenzell, Fribourg) by its mild taste. Beaufort is, in its young state, also stronger than comté. I have never had very aged beaufort and I am not even sure it can be aged as long as comté.

The ideal wine match with an aged comté would be a Jura savagnin (vin jaune).

Edited by Ptipois (log)
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