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Black Hummus Idea


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Decided to whip up a batch of hummus today. However, instead of canned garbanzo beans I want to use dried beans, and I realized that there's an Indian grocery nearby that sells black garbanzos. OK! Then it occured to me that there are black sesame seeds, and I found a source for black tahini. Based on what I now know, the hummus will end up a somewhat unappetizing grey, not what I want, regardless of taste. So, what might be used to color the hummus to give it a black color?

shel

 ... Shel


 

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You could try black food coloring paste--the kind used in cake frosting. It is widely available under the Wilton brand name at most craft/hobby stores and cooking stores. Or, try caramel coloring--it's more deep, deep brown than black--it's the stuff used to make loaves of pumpernickel bread turn that dark shade.

The hummus will probably be light grey--I think that only the seed coat of the black garbanzos is black. The insides are the same color as regular chickpeas, and the skin color fades after cooking.

This might be an interesting appetizer for a Halloween party...

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You could try black food coloring paste--the kind used in cake frosting.  It is widely available under the Wilton brand name at most craft/hobby stores and cooking stores.  Or, try caramel coloring--it's more deep, deep brown than black--it's the stuff used to make loaves of pumpernickel bread turn that dark shade.

The hummus will probably be light grey--I think that only the seed coat of the black garbanzos is black.  The insides are the same color as regular chickpeas, and the skin color fades after cooking.

This might be an interesting appetizer for a Halloween party...

Hi,

I've used black garbanzos before - I have access to three different beans here. The one I used did have a lighter interior than the exterior, but was a bit darker than a typical garbanzo. I'll have to check the others to see how dark their interiors are. The flavor of the black beans is quite a bit different than the typical bean, and that's mostly why I use the black beans. I'll look into your coloring suggestions. Thanks!

scb

 ... Shel


 

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Try mixing it with some black beans?  It'll probably only come out a darker shade of grey.

Yes, black beans give a greyish color. They probably won't give the dark color I'm hoping to find.

scb

 ... Shel


 

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Problem with black food coloring is that it also blackens the diner's mouth and teeth. Not appetizing.

I wouldn't have a problem with gray, but that's me. You could also layer it with the tan stuff or use it as decoration.

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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I've made babaghanouj with black sesame paste before, and it did turn a rather pasty shade of gray. It tasted fine, though. Any particular reason why you want a dark black colour, or do you just want to see if it can be done? Squid ink sounds like a fascinating experiment.

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I've made babaghanouj with black sesame paste before, and it did turn a rather pasty shade of gray. It tasted fine, though. Any particular reason why you want a dark black colour, or do you just want to see if it can be done? Squid ink sounds like a fascinating experiment.

Just to see if it can be done, but, if it can, I've envisioned some interesting presentation possibilities. Never having worked with squid ink, I've no idea how it would affect the flavor of the dish, nor do I know how to use it or where to get it. Any suggestions?

scb

 ... Shel


 

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Problem with black food coloring is that it also blackens the diner's mouth and teeth. Not appetizing.

I wouldn't have a problem with gray, but that's me. You could also layer it with the tan stuff or use it as decoration.

Yes, the icing food coloring does stain some, but the caramel coloring doesn't. You can buy powered caramel coloring from King Arthur Flour's website.

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Just to see if it can be done, but, if it can, I've envisioned some interesting presentation possibilities. Never having worked with squid ink, I've no idea how it would affect the flavor of the dish, nor do I know how to use it or where to get it. Any suggestions?

My pat answer would be - from a squid? :biggrin: But seriously, maybe from a good fishmonger, or an Asian market? How it would taste, I have no idea. My avatar notwithstanding, I've never worked with any cephalopods or cephalopod products. A quick google revealed this interesting site. And this one.

Actually, the more I read about this, the more interested I get. I love the idea of black foods - there are quite a few of them in Japan, such as eggplants and hijiki. Please post pictures if you decide to experiment further.

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Just to see if it can be done, but, if it can, I've envisioned some interesting presentation possibilities.  Never having worked with squid ink, I've no idea how it would affect the flavor of the dish, nor do I know how to use it or where to get it.  Any suggestions?

scb

You could also try an Italian grocer.

Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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The squid ink shouldn't flavor the hummus too much, though I would wait on adding salt until tasting it with the ink. It doesn't tend to have a squidy flavor, in my experience, though a little bit of a muddled salt flavor (we used it to make filthy dirty black martinis).

When I first read the thread, my instinct was definetly the squid ink. A little goes a long way...

Gnomey

The GastroGnome

(The adventures of a Gnome who does not sit idly on the front lawn of culinary cottages)

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Having just asked a similar question HERE, I would suggest beets! You could do it less deeply than I did which would temper the beet flavor some, but it would be a nice flavor to go with hummus. My thought is that grey and purple will be very close to black.

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