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Kosher Salt


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Does anyone know if there's such a thing as 'kosher salt' in France? It's prevalent in the US, even though (I suspect) a majority of people who use it don't use it for koshering.

I've checked in some of the Jewish épiceries in the Marais, as well as in the kosher section of supermarkets, and never saw anything. Was just wondering if it is available.

(According to that bastion of truth, Wikipedia says that only in the UK is there something called 'koshering salt. Elsewhere, they say, it's called "(coarse) cooking salt." Hmmmm....because the gros sel in France, grey or otherwise, is a lot larger than the kosher salt that I'm familiar with.)

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I've been on a hunt for it myself and have never found it here. The closest I've come, and it's not too close, is the Reflets de France Sel Moulu. I quite like that now, but it's a lot denser than kosher.

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I hope this helps. It's kind of funny I was looking for a good sour pickle recipe on the web elsewhere as well as reading the forum here for preparation for my Paris trip. The pickle recipe gives a source for the salt you want.

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/archives/2008...schwartz_1.html It is your own site but maybe you forgot?

David West

A.K.A. The Mushroom Man

Founder of http://finepalatefoods.com/

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Being in Australia, where it is also not seen, I've been wondering about Kosher salt myself.

Looking at the Wikipedia article on it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosher_salt , it appears that Kosher salt is not "kosher" as such (all salt is) but is rather a form of salt without additives (ie. no iodine, etc) that comes in larger grains than normal. This means that it doesn't dissolve as easily and stays in contact longer with the meat that is being "Koshered." Perhaps it should be called "koshering" salt?

My reading of this is that any salt without additives of a particular size is likely to have the same effect. But there lies the catch: If you have never seen kosher salt, how do you know what grain size is appropriate? :unsure:

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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The easiest to find is; Baliene Gros in the Red box . This has the right grain size. You should find it in most Super Markets.

The issue with it is that it does have iodine. 10-15mg/Kg.

For cooking/ salting/brining purposes I've found that it works well; just as well as kosher salt in the states.

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In Canada, "pickling salt" is the equivalent to "kosher salt".  I wonder if you could find a closer substitute if you looked for pickling salt (or whatever salt is used for pickling) in France.

Windsor pickling salt really is an unsung hero. It is coarser compared to Windsor kosher salt , but easy to use, and doesn't need an anti-caking agent. Many kosher salts use one or more additives.

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I'd use grey salt from Guérande, found in any supermarket. The crystals are irregular-shaped but they are additive-free. A little pounding in a mortar should make it suitable.

Or you might want to use fleur de sel if you're very rich, the crystals are more regular-shaped.

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Windsor pickling salt really is an unsung hero.  It is coarser compared to Windsor kosher salt , but easy to use, and doesn't need an  anti-caking agent. Many kosher salts use one or more additives.

The pickling salt is also a couple of dollars cheaper than the kosher, at least in Winnipeg!

I bought some kosher salt in the US, but had to leave it behind for fear my baggage would be overweight. As it turned out, I had just under 5 lbs to spare, so I could have brought it after all!

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