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Gourmet magazine on Paris


sharonb
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I think the funniest thing I have read in the magazine so far is Grant Achatz' statement that his favorite cocktail is a gin and tonic - ideally consumed in Europe.

I thought his response about whom he'd have dinner with was really very odd. Something about wanting to dine with himself.. my magazine is out in the truck or I'd quote it.

Edited by pax (log)
“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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Can you tell me which neighborhoods he described that you (or anyone else here who is familiar with Paris) feel comfortable walking around in after dark - just wandering around (and I will assume the rest would be ones where it is best to take a taxi to and from a restaurant).

I cannot think of one that I'd be uncomfortable walking in.

I've yet to read the article, but on this point I have fond memories of spending a few weeks in a rental apartment in the 10th about 5 years ago. Despite many previous trips to Paris, this was my first experience in that quartier. I must admit, the neighborhood didn't make a great first impression. But it didn't take me long to fall for it, and I've either stayed there or nearby in subsequent trips.

What made it easy for me to get past first impressions was that I've spent my adult life living in cities, and not always in the best of neighborhoods. Scruffy doesn't scare me. But if that's outside your experience generally, I can imagine being uncomfortable in some of these neighborhoods, at least after dark.


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I think the article is getting too much attention! It's all info key-up foodies have already since, in most cases, years. Just happens to have come out (and have ben "discovered") in a big magazine. Good choices, but nothing cutting edge...

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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Can you tell me which neighborhoods he described that you (or anyone else here who is familiar with Paris) feel comfortable walking around in after dark - just wandering around (and I will assume the rest would be ones where it is best to take a taxi to and from a restaurant).
I cannot think of one that I'd be uncomfortable walking in.

And I'd walk anywhere with John Talbott as my wingman.

:wink:

Edited by mzimbeck (log)

Meg Zimbeck, Paris by Mouth

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I think the article is getting too much attention! It's all info key-up foodies have already since, in most cases, years. Just happens to have come out (and have ben "discovered")  in a big magazine. Good choices, but nothing cutting edge...

What is "cutting edge" these days - and do you like it? Robyn

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I think the article is getting too much attention! It's all info key-up foodies have already since, in most cases, years. Just happens to have come out (and have ben "discovered")  in a big magazine. Good choices, but nothing cutting edge...

What is "cutting edge" these days - and do you like it? Robyn

I was just about to ask the SAME question.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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