Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pizza Dough


mroybal
 Share

Recommended Posts

Cool. I'll be interested to see how it goes. (Funny how he says "golden brown" but in the pictures the edge is all burned, eh ? But don't tell anyone I said so :wink: ).

it's not burned, it's charred! :blink::huh:

Anyway, the dough came together quite nicely, I think. Added everything into the bowl and mixed as specified. Actually, the mixing instructions didn't say to use paddle or dough hook. So, I did the first mix with the paddle to get evetything to come together. after the rest, I did the second mix using the dough hook. The dough is parked in the fridge, fermenting away. I checked it this morning and it's already doubled in size.

The biggest test will be when it comes to actually stretching out the dough to make a pizza. Generally, my doughs are either too hard to work (wont't stretch. Snaps back) or too easy too works (stretches too easily).

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have Pizza stones, but I only use 'em for baking bread,

I do pizza on a 1/4" thick steel plate...I set the oven for the usual(max) 550º, with it on the bottom rack.(closest to the heating element) I load the pizza just after the oven reaches 550º...At that moment the plate is close to 700º..

The heat transfer from steel is much, much greater than stone, so I get very crisp crust in a short time.and the top layer is just getting brown...

Bud

I like this idea.. seems a bit opposed to the Nathan M Project.. which puts the vessels near the broiling element .

paul

I think I will eventually get around to both methods, but I dont really understand Nathan, preheating the oven to 550 with the plate in then turn on the broiler.. my broiler elements take a fairshare of time to warm to hot.

Here is my Plate:

5528232242_9553700e69.jpg

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to make some pizza over the weekend and need so make some dough. I have some "go to" recipes, but I am planning on trying out a different one this time. Poking around in my bookmarks, I found I had set one to a Peter Reinhart blog. I took a look and decided to make the "NY Style Pizza Dough" You can find a link to the recipe right here.

http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes.html

I'm going to make the dough tonight and park it in the fridge and bake a pizza with it tomorrow night for dinner. It will make enough dough for several small pies. I'll get going on it and report back.

Interesting! He has the instructions for using the paddle and the dough hook for this dough in his American Pie book. In the book, he also includes instructions for making and using the dough on the same day. Looking forward to seeing how this works out for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's not burned, it's charred! :blink::huh:

- like my authentic toast :shock:

... The biggest test will be when it comes to actually stretching out the dough to make a pizza. Generally, my doughs are either too hard to work (wont't stretch. Snaps back) or too easy too works (stretches too easily).

Sounds like a hydration issue / hydration consistency across different flours ? Unless it's too much or too little dough development.

I don't know that there's such a thing as 'stretches too easily', not the way I like my pizza. I keep my pizza dough pucks each in its own wee oiled plastic bag. Once a puck's proofed, I drop flour on top of the dough and use that barrier to turn it out onto one hand, flour the other side and I'm good to hand-shape with no sticking, the excess flour simply dropping off (in my kitchen: dropping the flour into the sink) before shaping. Loose & highly-developed as it is, my dough is impossible to handle without the flour. Even oiled it sticks mercilessly.

What's your approach ?

Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting! He has the instructions for using the paddle and the dough hook for this dough in his American Pie book. In the book, he also includes instructions for making and using the dough on the same day. Looking forward to seeing how this works out for you.

Isn't it always better tasting and easier to work after an overnight slow rise in the fridge?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's not burned, it's charred! :blink::huh:

- like my authentic toast :shock:

... The biggest test will be when it comes to actually stretching out the dough to make a pizza. Generally, my doughs are either too hard to work (wont't stretch. Snaps back) or too easy too works (stretches too easily).

Sounds like a hydration issue / hydration consistency across different flours ? Unless it's too much or too little dough development.

I don't know that there's such a thing as 'stretches too easily', not the way I like my pizza. I keep my pizza dough pucks each in its own wee oiled plastic bag. Once a puck's proofed, I drop flour on top of the dough and use that barrier to turn it out onto one hand, flour the other side and I'm good to hand-shape with no sticking, the excess flour simply dropping off (in my kitchen: dropping the flour into the sink) before shaping. Loose & highly-developed as it is, my dough is impossible to handle without the flour. Even oiled it sticks mercilessly.

What's your approach ?

Those are god questions, but I really don't know how to tell if it's a hydration issue or not. I too divide dough into individual plastic bags after the initial over night ferment in the fridge. Then I shape

The recipe I use most calls for regular bread flour. It's frequently haard to work out. And it's always hard to get the dough even in thickness. I just do it by hand. Not really sure how to describe the shaping technique. It's something I picked up watching on TV. The other recipe I use was from Reinhart, and calls for regular AP flour. Actually, calls for the flour to be COLD and the water to be ice cold. This frequently comes out too slack. I pick it up to shape by hand and it droops quickly. And then can fall apart. Really don't know if I over work the dough when mixing or under work it. If find it hard to believe it's OVER worked, because it would be mixed for a few minutes.

Anyway, I am going to shape the dough I made last night. We'll see how it goes.

In any case, I usually to manage to shape out a pizza. It's not always nice and round and even. But it works. And it always tastes good.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting! He has the instructions for using the paddle and the dough hook for this dough in his American Pie book. In the book, he also includes instructions for making and using the dough on the same day. Looking forward to seeing how this works out for you.

Isn't it always better tasting and easier to work after an overnight slow rise in the fridge?

Yes, I have found it is always better tasting after a long slow rise. I don't know about it being easier to work. When the dough doesn't want to stretch I give it a rest and come back later, but I'm still working on my stretching skills. I tend to get really thin dough, often with tears, in the center and thicker outer rims. But it always tastes good! :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't it always better tasting and easier to work after an overnight slow rise in the fridge?

In my experience, no. It's always much better after a long slow rise (5 or 6 hours at 20C-ish room temp) as opposed to a minimum one-time "double in volume", but I see slowing it down in fridge & freezer as a (big !) convenience rather than a flavour step. I've not noticed a difference in flavour between the three, all other factors being equal.

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Made another one last night. This time, I shaped it by pressing down on the dough with my hands and a rolling pin. Also, I put the basil leaves on there for just the last two minutes of baking.

morepizza-20110327-153046.jpg

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...

My most recent effort...65% - 68% hydration (KA A/P flour), tiny bit of instant yeast, no olive oil, no-knead 16 hour bulk fermentation, 48 hour retardation in fridge. Got the stone up to 600°F. Baked in just over 5 minutes.

2012_01_26 Pizza top.jpg

2012_01_26 Upskirt Pizza.jpg

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Weinoo (et al) - How long does it take your stone to get up to temp? My upskirts don't come anywhere near that level of browning, even with ~8min bake times and minimum 30 minute preheat at about 550-600F. Is 30 minutes really insufficient? I'm not trying to replicate Neapolitan style pizza obviously, but I'd love more color underneath.

On the wishlist is a 3/4" aluminum slab...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Weinoo (et al) - How long does it take your stone to get up to temp? My upskirts don't come anywhere near that level of browning, even with ~8min bake times and minimum 30 minute preheat at about 550-600F. Is 30 minutes really insufficient? I'm not trying to replicate Neapolitan style pizza obviously, but I'd love more color underneath.

On the wishlist is a 3/4" aluminum slab...

My stone was preheated for a good hour.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Weinoo (et al) - How long does it take your stone to get up to temp? My upskirts don't come anywhere near that level of browning, even with ~8min bake times and minimum 30 minute preheat at about 550-600F. Is 30 minutes really insufficient? I'm not trying to replicate Neapolitan style pizza obviously, but I'd love more color underneath.

On the wishlist is a 3/4" aluminum slab...

My stone was preheated for a good hour.

I don't keep track but I guarantee my oven is on for at least 2 hours before baking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A good IR thermometer can help you judge. A stone is heated when the center is at the same temperature as the oven, any additional heating is going to be useless. Unless it's a particularly thick stone, this is going to happen soon after the surface has reached temp. Check with an IR thermometer and once the stone and the walls are the same temperature, it'll only take another 15 minutes max.

If you're using a metal stone rather than a ceramic one, you can heat it on the stovetop to give it a jumpstart. Should take no longer than 20 minutes if you've preheated the stone on the stove.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...