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The Dining Room at Anthony David's


Rosie
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I felt so cozy and comfortable at The Dining Room at Anthony David’s, 111 10th Street, Hoboken. This charming 30 seat BYO that serves as a deli, cheese shop, and gourmet food market in the daytime transforms itself into a wonderful restaurant at night. One room with brick covered walls and pillowed banquettes is small but enchanting. The other room with its wood floors, tin ceiling, grocery shelves, delightful knickknacks, cheese case, and coffee barrels has a few tables and is roomier. We sat here and I felt as if we were dining in my dad's grocery store; that was a wonderful feeling.

Chef owner Anthony Pino, a graduate of Johnson & Wales University, serves sophisticated cuisine. We started out with bread from Sullivan Street bakery served with a white bean paste and olive oil. We couldn't decide what to have as an appetizer. Everything sounded so good from the warm potato tart with prosciutto, caramelized onions and micro greens to the rabbit ravioli with chanterelles with herb broth and pecorino. But the pasta selections beckoned us and we had grilled littlenecks with crispy pancetta, crushed tomatoes, chili and perciatelli (a thin hollow pasta that is about twice as thick as spaghetti). We swooned over this dish. The al dente pasta with crunchy pancetta, hot chili and salty clams all added up to a fabulous multitextured dish.

Rabbit lovers should not miss the braised rabbit with tomato and saffron served with lumpy mashed potatoes topped with a thin potato galette. Lowell had to hold onto his plate as I kept digging into the meat and sauce. I had a grilled salmon with creamy fregola flavored with gremolata. The fregola tasted like barley but is actually a larger form of couscous from Sardinia which is made with coarsely ground semolina grains that have been sprinkled with water, dried and grated. Accompanying the salmon were fried artichoke hearts. Delicious.

The Dining Room at Anthony David’s specializes in cheeses and 30 to 40 selections are offered nightly. Our waiter, Jose helped us pick out a selection of three cheeses and we were pleased with his help. We had a La Roche-Blue Crème, a Tomme de Savoie, and an Idiazabal which were served with fresh berries, olives and bread. Some of the desserts non cheese lovers can opt for are homemade bourbon glazed donuts; fresh berries with Grand Marnier and marscapone; chocolate cake with pistachio gelato; cardamom baked apple in pastry; and vanilla panna cotta with cherry sauce. Coffee was served in a soup bowl sized cup and was very good.

Service was attentive and everyone seemed anxious to please. With tax and tip the meal was $87. The one downer is the non-existent parking in Hoboken. We ended up in a parking lot which added $10 to the evening.

The Dining Room at Anthony David’s is open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday from 5 to 10 PM and brunch from 10 AM to 3 PM on Sunday. For reservations call 201-222-8359.

Rosalie Saferstein, aka "Rosie"

TABLE HOPPING WITH ROSIE

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sounds like they expanded to an adjoining space? i would say that this will become quite a popular spot if that's the case. the food is relatively exciting, and the place has a nice vibe. perhaps the early 20 somethings won't go often, but the late 20 somethings/30 somethings and 40 somethings no doubt will.

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Yes, they must have broken through to the next door store.

"perhaps the early 20 somethings won't go often, but the late 20 somethings/30 somethings and 40 somethings no doubt will. "

Well--I don't fit into any of those categories and I went!

:biggrin:

Rosalie Saferstein, aka "Rosie"

TABLE HOPPING WITH ROSIE

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  • 3 weeks later...

i stopped into anthony david's today for brunch.

i was very, very pleased. we sat in the front room, which used to be the retail space. they've added several tables and it's quite cosy yet roomy. i had some of the best steak and eggs i've ever had (although it might be important to note that i was very hungry). hanger steak and eggs. the steak was perfectly cooked to order (med-rare), and was juicy, well-seasoned, and had a great grilled char. the scrambled eggs were fluffy and perfect. the "bruch potato" was served with onion and peppers, and had an indian flair. a nice addition. two bottles of oregon pinot noir hit the spot.

the new back room, which if i recall used to be, what, a shoe repair place? a tatoo place? i dunno, whatever, was nicely decorated and seats about 16 or so.

we took a look at the dinner menu, and we saw that it was a a prix fixe at about 56 or 60 dollars. quite pricey for hoboken, but from what i saw, well worth it, especially factoring in the BYO aspect. i'm sure that they offer a la carte as well, but i didn't get a chance to review that menu.

from a strictly food aspect, i could see this place giving amanda's a run for the money. amanda's, in my eyes, is one of the only "fine dining" spots in hoboken, which is a sea of burgers, pasta and chicken.

the website

p.s. it might be of interest to note that the prices on the website are outdated. however, 2 sodas, steak and eggs, and the chopped salad came in at about 24 dollars. about as cheap as the malibu diner as far as i can tell.

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4 of us had a great dinner at The Dining Room At Anthony David's, 111 10th St. Hoboken 201-222-8359.

There are two dining rooms, try and get the "front" as it like dining in a old country store.

2 types of crusty bread are served with both a plate of nice olive oil and a delicious bean spread.

Because of a couple of "celebrities" with us, we were served a bevy of extras including a wonderful guacomole infused with lime and molded with cucumber with a drizzle of oil and ?. This was a treat for flavor and texture.

Next a butternut squash and coconut soup that was mild and yet assertive in flavor, a great combination.

Now on to the meal :biggrin: 2 people split the Veal Bolognese pasta which contained thick pieces of veal with porcini, arugula and of course homemade tagliatelle. It was pronounced wonderful.

The other appetizer was the salad which consisted of prosciutto, parmesan, baby arugula, pistachios and a balsamic reduction. Also an excellent start.

Entrees were a delicious roasted free range chicken with olives, pancetta, spinach and mashed potatoes.

Next was a delicate tenderloin of pork stuffed with cacciatorino, asagio and with a merlot sauce. Also came with potatoes and braised cabbage.

Third was a huge portion of grilled lamb chops with an atichoke and mushroom ragout and with a parmesan crisp. Prepared perfectly (med. rare) this was delicious.

Last was a sublime pan roasted halibut with fresh vegetables, olives, bits of egg with a dijon vinaigrette. This was perhaps the best dish of all, rich yet easy to eat.

Desserts consisted of a 5 cheese plate accented with fresh raspberries, blackberries and sliced apricots. With wedges of bread this was sensational.

Also had an order of fresh glazed doughnuts. Krispy Kreme has nothing on these bad boys :biggrin:

2 strong coffees finished things off. Because of some circumstances the final bill I quote is for the appetizers, entrees, coffee and tax. $65.00 per couple which is excellent value. Complimentary starters, cheese plate and doughnuts have been left out of the cost per couple.

Just a wonderful dinner, the owner-chef is a hard working very nice person. We were lucky to speak to him before we left.

A great night and the company wasn't bad either :wink:

Tom

PS Had not been to Hoboken in a few years. This has to be the worst place I've been, outside of Shanghai and Manila, to get a parking space.

Tom D

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Next a butternut squash and coconut soup that was mild and yet assertive in flavor, a great combination.

.........

PS  Had not been to Hoboken in a few years.  This has to be the worst place I've been,  outside of Shanghai and Manila,  to get a parking space.

Tom -

this soup sounds great, was it thick and creamy? or thinner, more like a broth?

Parking in Hoboken has never been good, we've used the pay lot on 14th, almost opposite the end of Washington at night. $9, IIRC.

Paul

Apparently it's easier still to dictate the conversation and in effect, kill the conversation.

rancho gordo

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Tom didn't mention if it was prix fixe, and Tommy's link noted that his look at the menu showed that it was...I'd be interested in knowing this detail. Sounds like its worth a visit, even though it s a BYO. I really enjoy Amanda's, but it would be nice to expand my Hoboken options...any chandce that they may pick up a liquor license?

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The soup smelled like acorn squash to me. It was medium thick. Not a puree but certainly not a thin broth. I liked it. I certainly hope they don't get a liquor license.

I would like to add that the staff was wonderful. Lowell and I got there at 7:30 for an 8 PM reservation. It was raining so hard and we got a parking spot so decided to wait at the restaurant. I prefer the main room where the "gourmet" deli is with all of the foods and cheeses. At first they were unable to sit us there and sat us in the "newer" room which is lovely with it's brick walls and pillowed seats but doesn't have the ambiance of the other room. A party of 6 didn't show up and didn't call to cancel (unforgiveable) and the staff offered to move us to the other room. They didn't have to do this as we were already seated with open wine and water.

Parking IS horrendous in Hoboken but we were able to park on Frank Sinatra drive which is a few blocks from the restaurant.

And--the restaurant has 36 seats. Make a reservation a few weeks in advance.

Rosalie Saferstein, aka "Rosie"

TABLE HOPPING WITH ROSIE

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To answer some of the questions. The soup was not a broth but not thick from cream or milk, rather from the texture of the squash.

They offer a prix fixe but we all ordered ala carte.

A liquor license??? You are joking right :biggrin:

This place is well worth seeking out. The chef-owner is the nicest guy you will ever meet.

We will go back despite the parking situation and from me that is saying something (absolutely NO patience).

Tom

Tom D

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They offer a prix fixe but we all ordered ala carte.

A liquor license???  You are joking right :biggrin:

Thanks for the info.

While I agree that a nice local BYO has its place in the world, a restaurant doesn't make it on my radar without a liquor license. That's because in Hoboken, I would not be dining with close friends .. my fellow diners would be business aquaintainces, or clients. It is presumptuous to bring these types to a BYO...I would never consider it. Similiarly, I would not bring them to a strict ethnic restaurant, either. At least 75% of my more formal dining is a business meal.

Truthfully, I just don't prefer a BYO...even if it s just my husband and I. I am willing to pay for the flexibility that a LL brings with it...I know this is not a popular e-gullet opinion, its just my opinion. :smile: But my e-gullet assistant, Georgio, when not mixing me margaritas or finding my most recent posts, agrees with me!

Edited by Kim WB (log)
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I would like to add that the staff was wonderful.

That's good to hear as the counter staff in its pre-restaurant days was less than friendly on several ocassions.

The Critical Diner

"If posts to eGullet became the yardstick of productivity, Tommy would be the ruler of the free world." -- Fat Guy

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That would be $5 with tip, as anywhere within the Hoboken city limits is $3 (and they're usually happy with a $1 tip... unless of course it's late nite and you get sick in the back seat of the cab).

In another year, Hoboken should change, yet again. The Light Rail may be running in late 2003, and will cross 14th street down by the overpass. That should dramatically accelerate the economic activity at the far (from the river) end of 14 th street.

This segment will run from the current terminus at the PATH / Lackawanna Hoboken station north along the west side of Hoboken past the projects, curve under the trestle at 14th, station at 14th street, bend toward the river and cross under Willow Avenue, a station at Paine Webber, skirt the Lincoln Tunnel helix, and end at the NY Waterway ferry terminal. The next phase takes it under the mountain, and along the west side of the ridge to Fairview. That's 2005-2006, I believe. Menendez (now the #2 in the Democrat leadership) and Lautenburg have been sponsors of the work in past years.

The right of way has been cleared, grading and roadbed work is underway along the entire project.

Edited by Rail Paul (log)

Apparently it's easier still to dictate the conversation and in effect, kill the conversation.

rancho gordo

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