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I'm bringing in purple hull peas this weekend. It is nearly the only type of crop that I can grow well in the heat and humidity in South Florida in August. Great low maintenance crop - they fix their own nitrogen in the soil - and the hotter and more humid it is the better they seem to perform. They are fungus prone, so a dose or two of Daconil is in order and not handling them or walking through them while they are damp from dew or rain is appropriate. Rotate something else between pea crops, because they also attract a mean namatode. I usually go with tomatoes or squash or even southern greens - as they are from different families.

I use ham stock as well on nearly all of my peas. Not that chicken stock would be bad at all.

I also freeze the "pea soup" and the few stray peas that always seem to be leftover to dump into a big pot of veg soup with corn, tomato and okra. Yum.

You should be able to find fresh peas in the south up until first frost. In fact, the ones right before first frost (that the farmers bring in because they know they will be destroyed) can be quite good. Usually young, and some immature snaps (that I love)! Just try them all - they are all good, and they all have their own distinctive flavor. You can also just make a big pot of snaps in broth, if the frost catches you.

They sometimes act as a main at my house, rather than a side, over rice.

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If there are any to be found there I'm sure Berkeley Bowl would have them. I use to live there and if anything was available fresh they'd have it. You might try Monterey Market as well but BB is the best shot.

The Bowl has black-eyed peas right now, but I didn't see any other type of fresh shelling bean when I was there a few days ago.

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  • 2 years later...

Has anybody grown peas during the fall? Just wondering how well they fared in the humid, coastal south...seems like pea plants are pretty cool-weather tolerant, but I dunno if they'll flower & set pods. I'm gonna try it and see.

I grow them in spring and fall. I like the fall garden much better but if you have an early killing frost it can hurt you but most years its not a problem. Much more comfortable picking in the fall and the peas are sweeter.

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Southern peas are a love of mine, and while they're harder to find in Central Texas than in Houston, I'm avidly awaiting the pea season as we speak. My favorites are Lady Creams, then Purple Hulls, then Black Eyes. I'm not a fan of Crowder peas - they have a dull, starchy taste even when cooked.

For the more delicate peas, I like to saute a little bacon (well, a good amount of bacon), then throw in some onion or shallot and a little garlic. When all that's soft, some fresh thyme, a dash of cayenne, some pepper, and enough good chicken stock to cover the peas by a couple of inches. Simmer for 30-45 minutes until the peas are very tender, add salt and serve with the bacon on top.

Now there's a couple of ways to do this. I personally like to have cornbread and greens with my peas in a small bowl with enough of the cooking liquid to make things soupy - this is mainly because I love my chicken stock. Another nice touch is to have some hot peppers soaking in vinegar and add heat that way. Leftover peas get made into pea fritters, which are delicious.

Thanks,

Zachary

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I like the lady peas and the zippers best. Next time you plant your fall garden try and locate some sugar anne peas. These are not cowpeas but a cross between an english and a snow pea and are used like snow peas. They are fantastic and grow well where cowpeas can be grown. I plant them a few weeks after the cowpeas and they do great.

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  • 6 months later...

Thought of this thread today. Made some meguez sausage today and used some of it with couscous and some fresh peppers and peas from the garden. It took a little time to make everything from the harissa paste to the sausage but the end result was worth the trouble.

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What do you serve on the side? For me it is sliced tomato, a bit of bacon, and cucumber/onion salad.

I love field peas cooked with some red pepper added and then when I eat them I mix in some chowchow. Cool zippy chow chow with slightly spicy field peas. YUMYUM.

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Actually, nothing. I've been trying to eat from the garden so stuff won't go to waste. Have peppers running out my ears. With this dish I was able to make use of the peppers in the harissa sauce for making the sausage and the paprika too. Other than the couscous, I think the whole dish was homegrown.

I grow a lot of field peas. Normally cook them with some salt pork or bacon but also use them in soups and stews. Like em with chow chow too or vidalia onion relish. Heck, I just like them.

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  • 7 months later...

Peas, of most any variety, are wonderful things. One should serve them with fried okra and creamed corn and sliced tomatos. Meat be damned.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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