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Korean Style whole potato


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I picked up already cooked small thin skin potatoes at a Korean grocery store in Sunnyvale, CA called Hankook. These were part of their banchan offerings along with all the kimchi and marinated meats.

They really did not look pretty, but I was curious. Not sure if they were fried or baked but they have wonderful firm texture with great potato taste and are coated with sesame oil and sesame seeds. I ate them with hichimi togarashi and wow, they were so good with beer.

Can anyone tell me the name of this Korean food? I would like to make them. Thanks!

Edited by shinju (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...
I picked up already cooked small  thin skin potatoes at a Korean grocery store in Sunnyvale, CA called Hankook.  These were part of their banchan offerings along with all the kimchi and marinated meats. 

They really did not look pretty, but I was curious.  Not sure if they were fried or baked but they have wonderful firm texture with great potato taste and are coated with sesame oil and sesame seeds.  I ate them with hichimi togarashi and wow, they were so good with beer. 

Can anyone tell me the name of this Korean food?  I would like to make them.  Thanks!

Hmmm were they cubed or shredded? It could be Kamja Chorim which is soysauce, sesame oil, a little sugar, garlic, and sesame seeds and the potatoes are stewed. Kamja bokkum which is stir fried potatoes with neutral oil, sesame oil to finish and sesame seeds...

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I picked up already cooked small  thin skin potatoes at a Korean grocery store in Sunnyvale, CA called Hankook.  These were part of their banchan offerings along with all the kimchi and marinated meats. 

They really did not look pretty, but I was curious.  Not sure if they were fried or baked but they have wonderful firm texture with great potato taste and are coated with sesame oil and sesame seeds.  I ate them with hichimi togarashi and wow, they were so good with beer. 

Can anyone tell me the name of this Korean food?  I would like to make them.  Thanks!

Hmmm were they cubed or shredded? It could be Kamja Chorim which is soysauce, sesame oil, a little sugar, garlic, and sesame seeds and the potatoes are stewed. Kamja bokkum which is stir fried potatoes with neutral oil, sesame oil to finish and sesame seeds...

Thanks for your reply. These were whole new potatoes. Still little chewy inside. It looked either fried whole or baked. Definite taste of sesame oil and seeds. I love how they were still chewy inside and great taste permeated all the way through. You know, they could also have been grilled or even stir fried. Hmmmm.......

Edited by shinju (log)
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Koreans tend to name their food lot of the time by the method they were cooked, so there can be many versions of stewed potatoes that are completely different. But I think I found something similr to what you had.

Does the picture look the same? Clickity ,and scroll down. Funny they call the new potatoes fish egg potatoes :) (ial kamja jorim okay the romanization sucks..) The potatoes are par boiled drained then add the seasonings and boiled again. Anyone hve a better definition for jorim then boiled? :unsure:

There are many variations of kamja jorim, as there are cooks, and even then they have more that one up their sleeves.

Okay too much caffeine gotta go. I hoped I helped a little.

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  • 2 months later...

Oh, wow, what a great link! I'm always happy to get a potato panchan, and kamja jorim is one of the best. I sometimes make kamjachae bokkum for a side dish at home (the second recipe on that link), but I never knew how to make jorim before. In Korea, they use malt syrup, though, don't they - not corn syrup, is that right? Do you think there's any difference.

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Oh, wow, what a great link! I'm always happy to get a potato panchan, and kamja jorim is one of the best. I sometimes make kamjachae bokkum for a side dish at home (the second recipe on that link), but I never knew how to make jorim before. In Korea, they use malt syrup, though, don't they - not corn syrup, is that right? Do you think there's any difference.

yes koreans use malt syrup.. when replacing malt syrup with corn syrup or honey use less as malt syrup is not as sweet..

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  • 2 weeks later...

감자 분생이. Gamja Bunsaeng-i. I'm pretty sure this is not what you found, but a Korean foodie friend told me about it this past weekend. He found it in Jongseon in Gangwon province. It's a local specialty, but he says it's the best form of potato he's ever eaten and would become popular internationally if anyone introduced it. Having lived in NYC for ten years, he said he never encountered anything like it there.

So anyway, I hope to track this mythical potato down someday. Anyone ever heard of it? Pics are great.

<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

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