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sliceable curd


Sethro
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Gelatin and agar both work great. I like the results with agar better but I'm going to play around with combining both one of these days just out of curiosity.

edit: I wonder if there's sufficient calcium in a curd for LM pectin to be an option?

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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So I'm guessing that more agar and less gelatin than if I was making a film? Maybe .25% gelatin and .15% agar?

Hmm I feel like there's probably some more suave way of dong it with ingredients I'm less familiar with...

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I guess that depends on whether you're looking for good results or looking to say "and for this curd I sheared .0032% methylglutaminase oxide into a bath of liquid carranutrinate sulfate at -49.5 celsius then heated it to +49.5 celsius in a vacuum cooker for 10.46 hours before immersing in liquid nitrogen for 5.2 seconds and chilling at +10 celsius for 24 hours". Agar and/or gelatin seemed to be just the right thing for Sam Mason, Alex Stupak and the folks at Ideas in Food when they were playing with sliceable curds but I'm sure there are other interesting ways of doing it. I've done sliceable, bendable custards with a combo of gelatin, agar and carrageenan. You already know about the carrageenan/LBG thing. LM pectin works well for that too. I haven't tried applying those to curds though. Maybe I will.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Oh, I was just imagining that there was a better way to maintain the texture of a curd than by using gelatin or agar. If I use enough gelatin to move it without breaking it, it will be pretty rubbery, right? If I use enough agar it will get grainy. I'm guessing because I haven't tried it yet. If I don't have to order another ingredient for the pantry I'd rather not...

I never tried Sam Mason's or Alex Stupak's but I guess I imagined it being a more revolutionary process. I'm happy if it's not.

EDIT: Also, if I'm using agar, what am I boiling it in? Just the lemon juice alone before I start the curd?

Edited by Sethro (log)
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According to chef Stupak, sorbitol was the key to achieving the flexibility in his chocolate ganache. The recipe also include glucose (no sucrose), gelatin and agar.

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I think I know what you are trying to achieve.

A couple of months ago I made a strawberry curd, molded it in a terrine as I needed to slice it so I could layer it with slices of cake to make dessert sandwiches.

I used Kuzu root starch, recommended by a friend who has been experimenting with various "setting" agents, and likes the silky texture this thickener produces, while keeping the product stable.

I used not quite double the amount called for in "regular" pudding and the results were as perfect as I could wish for.

I used it also in a lemon/cheese layered pie and had none of the weeping that has plagued my lemon meringue pies in the past.

My local health food store carries it in bulk and sells it by the ounce. But it is widely available on line

here is one vendor and I do buy from them.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I agree with Sethro, that is interesting. Is kuzu starch the same thing as kudzu starch? I used to use kudzu leaves (as a veg) and kudzu blossoms (as a flavoring agent, tastes and smells like a grape lollipop) when I lived in the southeast U.S. and I've read about the starch but I've never worked with it.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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So far carageenan + LBG is giving me the best result. It occurs to me that I actually used to do this back in the day just by thickening the curd with a tiny % cornstarch, freezing it and letting it thaw on the plate for as little as 1 minute. It held its shape 100% fine.

Gonna keep playing with it and maybe get some methcel A15 in there too sinche its going to be placed adjacent to a hot component...

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So I'm guessing that more agar and less gelatin than if I was making a film? Maybe .25% gelatin and .15% agar?

Hmm I feel like there's probably some more suave way of dong it with ingredients I'm less familiar with...

Films I like to use blends of arabic, methylcellulose, poly glycol alginate, carrageenan and or agar.

I know Sam Mason likes to use a blend of hi and low acyl gellan for his "eggless" lemon curd

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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I know Sam Mason likes to use a blend of hi and low acyl gellan for his "eggless" lemon curd

Ah. Well there we have it. My understanding is that the proportions of high to low acl gellan is usually 1:1. Does that sound about right?

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Interesting. Does it need to cook out at a boil like cornstarch? What % porportion did you try?

I use it as I would arrowroot. I like to experiment with various types of thickeners and like the results I got with kuzu (or kudzu) - it was recommended by the owner of the health food store.

here is a reference to most thickeners.

and here is another site to which I referred. when I first bought the product.

Wickipedia has a fairly extensive entry on kudzu.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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