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Saffy

Sommaq, Sumac, Sumak

123 posts in this topic

Simplest possible use - sprinkle it on plain white rice when serving.  Adds color, flavor, aroma.  You'll actually see shakers of sumak on the table at some middle-eastern restaurants.

-Dan

Terrific :biggrin: !


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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also works as a tenderiser.  add some to a lamb marinade.  try it on fish as well but don't leave it in too long.

Brillint :smile:


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Persian chelo kabob.

Can you tell me how thisis made? :huh:


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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I add it to my lahama jeen (sp ?) for a little tartness

I plan to try this :biggrin:


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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:sad: Any other ideas on waysto use this wonderful :wub: spice?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Hi Naftal

Zaatar is 1 part Thyme, 1 part sesame and a 1/4 part Sumac and salt to taste.

Sumac is used instead of lemon juice in Fattoush.

I have always wnted to know the rilght way tomake zaattar, thanks!

Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning. There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

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I know that there are people who use sumac( my favorite middle-eastern seasoning) to make lemonade. How do you do it? Do you use lemon juiceand sumac or just sumac? Enlighten me :blink:


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Sumac lemonade is made from the red berry clusters found on live Sumac bushes. Pull the entire clusters off, wash as little as possible (the more you wash them, or if picked after a rain the weaker the tea will be). Seep in water and sweeten to taste.

Good luck.

Don

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Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning.  There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

Right. But none of the blends I sell (or have seen) actually use zaatar leaves.

I don't have any real recipes that use sumac, but occasionally I'll use it when I make chicken kebabs. Just mix ground chicken with sumac, a little cumin, garlic, salt, pepper, grated red onion - onto sticks and chill. Grill and serve with fresh pita.

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Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning.  There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

Right. But none of the blends I sell (or have seen) actually use zaatar leaves.

I don't have any real recipes that use sumac, but occasionally I'll use it when I make chicken kebabs. Just mix ground chicken with sumac, a little cumin, garlic, salt, pepper, grated red onion - onto sticks and chill. Grill and serve with fresh pita.

You can find real zaatar in shops in the middle east, or you can grow your own. I've ordered seeds a few times but the orders always get screwed up. The zaatar I've got from Israel (made with zaatar) tastes quite different from the zaatar blend stuff I buy at the local middle-eastern market.

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It may be more pleasant if you strain the sumac-ade after you steep the berries. The berries are kind of hairy. Not to mention that critters live in the clusters.


sparrowgrass

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How about if you only have dried ground sumac?  I've never heard of sumac lemonade, but I love sumac and would like to try it.  No berries here, though.

Fresh sumac berries have a sticky, acidic exudate that is soluble in water. This part is what give sumac "lemonade" its citrusy flavor. Don't pick the berries from trees that grow by roadsides because the sticky stuff picks up road grime and exhaust particles.

I've never seen fresh sumac berry clusters for sale anywhere so you will probably need to find yourself a tree. Make SURE that it is sumac with RED berry clusters that you pick. Other sumac varieties are poisonous.

[Edited to add this link for further reference.]


Edited by doviakw (log)

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Hi Naftal

Zaatar is 1 part Thyme, 1 part sesame and a 1/4 part Sumac and salt to taste.

Sumac is used instead of lemon juice in Fattoush.

I have always wnted to know the rilght way tomake zaattar, thanks!

Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning. There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

There is a reason every recipe on the net for "zaatar", calls for "Thyme" (also a plant). Zaatar is an Arabic word, and translates to "Thyme" in most Arabic/English dictionaries.

I've been making my Zaatar from a bush I planted 15 years ago. It was labeled "Oregano" when I bought it. Its fuzzy leaves, smell, and resemble the wild Thyme found all over southern Lebanon and Palestine.

As for you not being able to find decent Zaatar around here, I say that crappy Zaatar can be had anywhere. You can start out with the best "Zaatar" plant, but if it's not dried and pounded properly, and mixed with the freshest sumac and toasted sesame seeds in the right ratios with just enough salt, and if it's not fresh, it's going to taste like saw dust.

So what is English for "Majorana syriaca"?

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How about if you only have dried ground sumac?  I've never heard of sumac lemonade, but I love sumac and would like to try it.  No berries here, though.

I am wondering about this too, all the trees in my area are by roadsides. Does anyone know if/how dried ground sumac is used in this? Could I use it the way I use any loose tea :wacko:


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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:laugh:

Hi Naftal

Zaatar is 1 part Thyme, 1 part sesame and a 1/4 part Sumac and salt to taste.

Sumac is used instead of lemon juice in Fattoush.

I have always wnted to know the rilght way tomake zaattar, thanks!

Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning. There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

There is a reason every recipe on the net for "zaatar", calls for "Thyme" (also a plant). Zaatar is an Arabic word, and translates to "Thyme" in most Arabic/English dictionaries.

I've been making my Zaatar from a bush I planted 15 years ago. It was labeled "Oregano" when I bought it. Its fuzzy leaves, smell, and resemble the wild Thyme found all over southern Lebanon and Palestine.

As for you not being able to find decent Zaatar around here, I say that crappy Zaatar can be had anywhere. You can start out with the best "Zaatar" plant, but if it's not dried and pounded properly, and mixed with the freshest sumac and toasted sesame seeds in the right ratios with just enough salt, and if it's not fresh, it's going to taste like saw dust.

So what is English for "Majorana syriaca"?

:laugh: I googled some terms- zaater, thyme and oregano are all used interchangably. Consider the following:majoranum syriaca(whose other scientific names are: origanum cyriacum and origanum maru and origanum syriacum) is known in English as bible hyssop, or as syrian oregano. Thymus capitatus, thymbra spicata, coridothymus capitatus and satureia capitata are all refered to as different varieties of either zaatar,or hyssop, or thyme. For example: thymbra spicata is called zatar hommar or donkey hyssop,whereas thymus capitatus is known as zaatar farsi,conehead thyme, maritime thyme and persian hyssop:cool:


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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There is a reason every recipe on the net for "zaatar", calls for "Thyme" (also a plant).  Zaatar is an Arabic word, and translates to "Thyme" in most Arabic/English dictionaries.

I've been making my Zaatar from a bush I planted 15 years ago. It was labeled "Oregano" when I bought it. Its fuzzy leaves, smell, and resemble the wild Thyme found all over southern Lebanon and Palestine.

As for you not being able to find decent Zaatar around here, I say that crappy Zaatar can be had anywhere. You can start out with the best "Zaatar" plant, but if it's not dried and pounded properly, and mixed with the freshest sumac and toasted sesame seeds in the right ratios with just enough salt, and if it's not fresh, it's going to taste like saw dust.

So what is English for "Majorana syriaca"?

English for Majorana Syriaca is Syrian marjoram - it's also called Syrian oregano, but I haven't seen it called thyme. Crappy Zaatar can indeed be found anywhere, that you make yours using leaves from the 'correct' plant no doubt makes it taste better (or more authentic anyway).

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Does anyone else have a favorite use for this wonderful spice? :wub: i love the taste of sumac but I have few occasions to use it :sad:


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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How about if you only have dried ground sumac?  I've never heard of sumac lemonade, but I love sumac and would like to try it.  No berries here, though.

I am wondering about this too, all the trees in my area are by roadsides. Does anyone know if/how dried ground sumac is used in this? Could I use it the way I use any loose tea :wacko:

We are really curious about this... :huh:


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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How about if you only have dried ground sumac?  I've never heard of sumac lemonade, but I love sumac and would like to try it.  No berries here, though.

Fresh sumac berries have a sticky, acidic exudate that is soluble in water. This part is what give sumac "lemonade" its citrusy flavor. Don't pick the berries from trees that grow by roadsides because the sticky stuff picks up road grime and exhaust particles.

I've never seen fresh sumac berry clusters for sale anywhere so you will probably need to find yourself a tree. Make SURE that it is sumac with RED berry clusters that you pick. Other sumac varieties are poisonous.

[Edited to add this link for further reference.]

Thanks for that link! I had no idea that the sumac that populates northern Minnesota is edible. Here I've been buying ground sumace at the Middle Eastern store, when I could have been making my own harvest. The link really helps set my mind at ease that I can distinguish between the poison "sumac" and the real deal.

Abra, that link suggests there might be an edible variety of sumac up your way. It's been too long since my last visit to Washington for me to be sure, but it seems I used to see it up there.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I like it sprinkled on green/tossed salads containing citrus fruit.

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When I was a kid, a guy named Euell Gibbons came out with a book on how to eat "nature". I was fascinated and I think I found the recipe for sumac lemonade in his book. Edible sumac grew all along our riverbed, as did elderberries. I made sumac lemonade several times. I remember boiling the berries and then adding lots of sugar. The berries are furry, the little furs will float in the water so straining the solution makes it more palatable. IIRC, it was alot like lemonade, we kids liked it.

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If I am not mistaken there are two types of sumac ( well at least in Russia) and inGeorgia they make this wornderful smelly hunelly spice mix widely used in Georgian and Ossetian cooking.

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If I am not mistaken there are two types of sumac ( well at least in Russia) and inGeorgia they make this wornderful smelly hunelly spice mix widely used in Georgian and Ossetian cooking.

Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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