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The Cream of the Crop


cooker4u22
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What kinds of foods do you consider the "cream of the crop"  in your kitchen?  what are some of the best recipes you have made with your hands?

That's a potentially interesting question(s) but I'll ask for an elaboration - are you thinking about prized ingredients? Recipes that don't require electricity?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Cream of the crop could simply mean any food that you enjoy making that's delicious. I made a cheesecake recently with the cheesecake customizer on creamcheese.com.. it wasn't the best I've ever had, but it definitely was still good.

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Focaccia comes to mind - water, yeast, flour, sugar, salt, oil and my own rosemary. In just a few hours you go from zero to hot rustic bread, with crunchy salt and good olive oil dripping from your elbows. Oh, yeah.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I think the best dish I have ever produced in my kitchen is slow braised pork belly with seared scallops, buttery potato puré and a madeira reduction.

I braised the pork belly in madeira, stock and spices until very very tender, cooled it under pressure (to produce a nice flat piece) and sliced it in neat squares. Defatted the braising liquid and reduced it to a sauce. Seared the belly cubes until crisp on the outside and melting inside and did the same with the scallops.

Dressed the plates with a little sauce, alternating pieces of belly and scallops in a neat row and a quenelle of potato puré at the end.

Not that complicated but very very good.

The dish was very much inspired by a dish from Gordon Ramsey at Royal Hospital Road where they serve braised pork belly, langoustine tails and creamed parsley with a madeira reduction.

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