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evo-lution

'National' drinks

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Hello all.

I'm currently compiling a list of cocktails that could be deemed the national cocktail of that country

For example:

Cuba - Daiquiri, Mojito

Brazil - Caipirinha

Bermuda - Dark & Stormy

Chile/Peru - Pisco Sour

USA - Old Fashioned/Mint Julep

French Islands (Martinique, Guadelope, Reunion, Maurice) - Ti Punch

Italy - Negroni

Mexico - Margarita

And so on, so forth. Over to you...

Cheers,

Adam

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Are you looking for cocktails that a large number of people in that country drink?

Or just the cocktail most associated with a particular country.

For example, I don't know many Mexicans that drink Margaritas. Sangritas are far more likely. Or just Tecate and a shot of tequila. If they're even drinking spirits at all. Likewise, is the Negroni particularly popular in Italy? I think the Americano or Campari and soda might be more appropriate.

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Are you looking for cocktails that a large number of people in that country drink?

Or just the cocktail most associated with a particular country.

Both, as I've found myself doing exactly what you've done in your post. I've found that some drinks we associate with specific countries are not necessarily consumed that much by it's natives.

I think the Negroni, for example, would fall into both categories, however the Margarita not so, as it's probably more of a 'world' drink than a Mexican drink, although it is associated with Mexico so in a round-about way it is their national drink. :blink:

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I'm going with michelada for Mexico . . .

I'll second that, or perhaps tequila with sangrita.

The only thing that I can come up with for Spain is the callimocho (red wine & coke) or sangria.

France? Pernod?

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This is going to be a tough one, because America and, to a lesser extent, the UK are the only countries with a significant cocktail culture. It's never been clear to me that drinks such as the Margarita and Pisco Sour particularly reflect cocktail culture by and for the citizens of the countries normally associated with them.

Speaking of the UK, might the national cocktail be the true Gimlet ("true" meaning that it uses Rose's Lime Juice and a high proof gin such as Plymouth Navy Strength)?

France could be pastis and water, or a Tomate (add grenadine) or a Mauresque (add orgeat).

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Can we subdivide the US?

I've no idea what the proper modern national drink should be.

Something they serve at Applebee's or Chile's, I would guess.

I feel like the Mojito is probably the most common and widely served drink in San Francisco bars.

But, I like Harrington's Jasmine as the drink that jump started modern mixology on the West Coast.

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I think even the Cuban mixed drinks of note were instigated by Hemingway, an American.

Finding a national cocktail representative of the whole US would be highly tricky, considering that the cocktail is essentially an American art. (Also, deciding whether mixed drinks that don't involve some form of bitters count is another ball of wax). Like jazz, though, the cocktail and the more general mixed drink have spread globally, so perhaps it's fair to look at the signature mixed drinks of other regions.

It's not a mixed drink, but Feuerzangenbowle, a technical variant of Gloeg, is probably the most identifiably German of drinks involving distilled spirits. There's even a movie.

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I've no idea what the proper modern national drink should be.

For me, the US national cocktail would be something like an Old Fashioned, Mint Julep, Cosmopolitan, Sazerac or Manhattan, for example.

A national drink should make you think about where it originated from. The Caipirinha makes you think of Copacabana beach, the Pimms Cup of playing croquet in England, the Mint Julep of the Kentucky Derby, the Cosmopolitan of a fashion show in New York...

I think that the base spirit would have to have some sort of link to the country as well, probably originating from there.

I feel like the Mojito is probably the most common and widely served drink in San Francisco bars.

Likewise here in the UK, but you could never claim the Mojito as the national drink for the US/UK as it's Cuban. Isn't it?

But, I like Harrington's Jasmine as the drink that jump started modern mixology on the West Coast.

Isn't there a bit of a debate as to who created the Jasmine, as I've seen this drink credited to Alex Turner?

This is going to be a tough one, because America and, to a lesser extent, the UK are the only countries with a significant cocktail culture.  It's never been clear to me that drinks such as the Margarita and Pisco Sour particularly reflect cocktail culture by and for the citizens of the countries normally associated with them.

It's not so much about cocktail culture, it's more about a drink that natives of the country are proud of, a drink that everyone around the world thinks is synonymous with that country

Speaking of the UK, might the national cocktail be the true Gimlet ("true" meaning that it uses Rose's Lime Juice and a high proof gin such as Plymouth Navy Strength)?

I wouldn't say that would be the national cocktail for the UK, or even Scotland/England.

The Tom Collins, for example, would probably be a more appropriate drink for England.

And again, something like a Rusty Nail would be more appropriate as the national drink of Scotland. Not because we're all chasing haggis in our kilts drinking hip-flasks of Rusty Nails :biggrin: , but because it gives people the feeling that they're holding a little bit of our country in their hands whilst they're drinking it. :wink:


Edited by evo-lution (log)

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[...]
But, I like Harrington's Jasmine as the drink that jump started modern mixology on the West Coast.

Isn't there a bit of a debate as to who created the Jasmine, as I've seen this drink credited to Alex Turner?

[...]

Wasn't aware of any controversy regarding the origin of the Jasmine.

Hotwired Jasmine Story (Internet Archive Link)

Call it an instant classic. The Jasmine has a short history, dating from a night a few years ago when Matt Jasmine, a dishwasher at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California, stopped in at our favorite East Bay bar and had the divine inspiration to ask Paul, our favorite alchemist, to mix him up something new. It was about 10:30 on a summer night, and Paul tells us that at the time, he happened to be thinking about the Pegu, which blends gin, bitters, Cointreau, and lime.

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Wasn't aware of any controversy regarding the origin of the Jasmine.

Staying off-topic, but the Diffords Guide (formerly Sauceguide) credits the drink to Alex Turner. :blink:

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Staying off-topic, but the Diffords Guide (formerly Sauceguide) credits the drink to Alex Turner.  :blink:

I'll drop a note to Mr. Difford and ask. I think I might even have an email address for Paul Harrington somewhere around. Don't know Mr. Turner.

Well, back to the subject at hand.

I was asking around a while ago about Caribbean drinks from Nassau/Bahamas. About the only good answer I got was the Goombay Smash, a specialty of Miss Emily's Blue Bee Bar.


Edited by eje (log)

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Just to get things a bit more confused, I would say the Cuba Libre for Trinidad...or the rum & coca cola (Andrews siters)...or the Queen's Park Swizzle.

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If we're subdividing the US, then Wisconsin gets the Brandy Manhattan.

Another candidate for WI would be the Brandy Old Fashioned, sweet or sour.

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For me, the US national cocktail would be something like an Old Fashioned, Mint Julep, Cosmopolitan, Sazerac or Manhattan, for example.

Um . . . The Martini, perhaps, should be in that list?

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Staying off-topic, but the Diffords Guide (formerly Sauceguide) credits the drink to Alex Turner.  :blink:

I'll drop a note to Mr. Difford and ask. I think I might even have an email address for Paul Harrington somewhere around. Don't know Mr. Turner.

[...]

I didn't hear back from Mr. Difford, but I did check the most recent Difford's Guide (#7). It credits the creation of the Jasmine to Paul Harrington.

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I didn't hear back from Mr. Difford, but I did check the most recent Difford's Guide (#7).   It credits the creation of the Jasmine to Paul Harrington.

Tales of the Cocktail probably?

Anyways, I had a scan at old volumes last night, volume 5 credits the drink to Alex Turner in 2001, then 5.2 to Paul Harrington in 1999.

:wink:

For me, the US national cocktail would be something like an Old Fashioned, Mint Julep, Cosmopolitan, Sazerac or Manhattan, for example.

Um . . . The Martini, perhaps, should be in that list?

Absolutely, as should a few more, but I'm curious to find out what people think is the quintessential American cocktail. Likewise with other countries...


Edited by evo-lution (log)

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Both of those dates seem odd to me, considering that Harrington's "Cocktail: The Drinks Bible for the 21st Century" published in 1998, and the drink was presumably crafted at least a year prior to publication.

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The Pocket Recipe Guide from the Museum of the American Cocktail by Robert Hess and Anistasia Miller credits the Jasmine to Harrington and gives "the 1990s" as the date.

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Both of those dates seem odd to me, considering that Harrington's "Cocktail: The Drinks Bible for the 21st Century" published in 1998, and the drink was presumably crafted at least  a year prior to publication.

Well, the book was more or less a compendium of the cocktails published on the cocktailtime and hotwired cocktail pages.

Unfortunately, the earliest I can find for either of those websites on the Internet wayback machine is 1998, and there's already a buy this book link and the Jasmine is listed as a cocktail.

Hotwired launched in 1994, with the website going live I think in 1995. Not sure when the cocktail stuff started on the website or exactly when Mr. Harrington was working at the Town House in Emeryville.

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