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Metallic taste in chocolate cake


Sif
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I sometimes have my chocolate cakes coming out with this weird metallic taste - like cheap supermarket chocolate cakes sometimes taste. I get this both with cheap cocoa and with expensive ones, like Valrhona. I always use dutch processed. I also get it with different recipes (vegan or non-vegan) and different pans, lined or not - so I am a bit lost.

I was wondering if the baking powder could be causing this taste, and why? I don't use baking soda.

Any help would be really appreciated.

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I had this same problem a little while ago when my supplier gave me their "in house" brand of baking powder. My scones tasted AWFUL! There was no way around the horrible metallic taste.

The culprit was sodium aluminum sulfate.

I switched brands and the problem was gone. My new brand has a little sodium aluminum sulfate, but there's other ingredients too, so now there is no metallic taste.

There are also "aluminum free" baking powders out there, like Rumford's.

You can also make your own single acting baking powder. Here's a recipe.

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Thanks! I guess I also found the answer to why my scones comes out almost inedible from time to time. What would I do without eGullet  :biggrin:

Sif, I note that you are in DENMARK.

I don't know what's in your baking powder!

US baking powders are commonly based on Aluminium salts (to give action at temperatures above room temperature - like when it goes into the oven).

If you just use Cream of Tartar, or lactic acid (from fermented milk products), or any other simple acid, then it will react with the Sodium Bicarbonate ("baking soda") as soon as they meet in the presence of moisture. So, you have to act quickly...

In the UK, most (all?) baking powders on retail sale are based on "disodium diphosphate" to get the higher temperature action with the Sodium Bicarbonate. And these don't seem to give any "metallic" aftertastes.

Check the small print of the ingredients listing carefully!

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Hm that is odd. Because I just checked my baking powder, and right you are, disodium diphosphate. No aluminium. But I still get the aftertaste once in a while. Maybe it's just too much baking powder then?

I will however switch to a brand that uses cream of tartar, just in case.

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