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Tiger skin roulade


raagamuffin
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Gosh! I recall seeing the recipe in a Chinese cookbook (a small inexpensive one) imported from Hong Kong, but I didn't buy it. How close are you to the recipe? What problems have you encountered?

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

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The sponge looks like a genoise or something similar divided into three portions, two are colored and you then spread in a pan in sections to create the color pattern. The outside raised brown pattern looks like a special pan was used. Not sure what more to add without more specific questions.

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The sponge looks like a genoise or something similar

I don't know......the crumb of it looks too fine to be genoise........

It might help if you tell us exactly WHAT you are looking for.......are you trying to find out how to make the color pattern? If so, you just take the cake batter and divide it into three parts. Keep one part uncolored, and add colors to the other two parts. Then deposit the batters into the pan side by side and they will bake together. Then for the outside ring, bake another sheet pan of plain batter.

I'm not exactly sure how that "brainy" pattern appears on the underside of the cake, except for what Rickster said about a special mold or pan.

Have you tasted the cake? Or are you just going by the picture?

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This sponge was seen at one of the pastry shops in Bangkok.Though,it was heard of before,as a hush hush kinda recipe.

Interested in the technique deployed in making the roulade,and not so much in the filling.

Whatever little,I could find out from someone who knew it,is that the sponge is baked at high temperature,and as it comes out of the oven,it is brushed with a thick sugar syrup, which results in the ribbed skin as seen in the photo.

Hope that this helps someone to nail it down.

Kind Regards,

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If the pattern was made from a mould, wouldn't it be more likely to have either a thin pale 'crust' or just have the alveoles exposed? I think I've had that before and the tiger skin effect tends to be a bit chewier than the interior sponge. Could it be a semi-thick sponge batter that is piped into a filigree design then baked at a high temperature? The design wouldn't completely disappear but would settle down enough to fill the gaps left by the piping.

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I don't know what they do in high-output bakeries, but from what I picked up in the cookbook, you're right, they do pipe on a separate batter onto the surface of the sponge.

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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The recipe for the tiger skin roll:

egg yolk 165 gr(aprox 6)

sugar 65 gr(2 1/2 tablespoon)

cornflour 25 gr(1 oz)

beat eggyolk and sugar till fluffy and pale, add corn flour and mix. Line an halfsheet baking tray with baking paper, pour mixture and bake at 400 F until you see tiger stripe, bake another 7 or 8 min with the oven door open. take it out, let it cool, don't overturn immediately.

I have the recipe from an asian food forum.

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looks a lot like tulip paste batter for the stripes and joconde for the skin. The tulip paste could be piped or daubed with the finger onto a silpat, frozen so it won't smear, and then overspread with joconde and baked. it's hard for me to tell from the picture is the brown part is raised up. piping it is going to give a flatter appearance to the brown stripes. you could come fairly close to duplicating this with those two recipes, which if you need them, i can post later today.

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The recipe for the tiger skin roll:

egg yolk 165 gr(aprox 6)

sugar 65 gr(2 1/2 tablespoon)

cornflour 25 gr(1 oz)

beat eggyolk and sugar till fluffy and pale, add corn flour and mix. Line an halfsheet baking tray with baking paper, pour mixture and bake at 400 F until you see tiger stripe, bake another 7 or 8 min with the oven door open. take it out, let it cool, don't overturn immediately.

I have the recipe from an asian food forum.

Wow, thanks so much for that! :smile:

I'm going to try it. I'm so curious to see how a simple blend of yolks, sugar, and cornflour (starch) will make that pattern in the oven. :cool:

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I just want to thank raagamuffin for posting this pic, and the incredible e.gullet brain trust for their their ideas which are such a pleasure to read.

Hallo Every one,

having tried the recipe ,posted by Maria,I think it is just a matter of time,before it is laid out in open.

The first trial has not been very successful,but ,some kind of pattern ,similar to the one in the picture emerged.

Will keep you all posted,it is a real pleasure to be a part of the fraternity here,who are ever so helpful.

This is the last forum ,which I come back to,only when I realise that ,nothing else would work.

Last time around,it was , the hibiscus papel garnish,which confounded me,and again Egullet came to my rescue.

Regards,

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The recipe for the tiger skin roll:

egg yolk 165 gr(aprox 6)

sugar 65 gr(2 1/2 tablespoon)

cornflour 25 gr(1 oz)

beat eggyolk and sugar till fluffy and pale, add corn flour and mix. Line an halfsheet baking tray with baking paper, pour mixture and bake at 400 F until you see tiger stripe, bake another 7 or 8 min with the oven door open. take it out, let it cool, don't overturn immediately.

I have the recipe from an asian food forum.

Wow, thanks so much for that! :smile:

I'm going to try it. I'm so curious to see how a simple blend of yolks, sugar, and cornflour (starch) will make that pattern in the oven. :cool:

Hey guys. I'm not sure about the science behind it but the tiger skin should be made with confectioner's sugar.

Raaga, it might make a difference in your second attempt.

Edited by judec (log)
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I remember making this a while back with a Chinese friend, so I remember the little tidbit about using powdered sugar.

This was hand whisked until my forearm stopped working but we used an electric mixer before. Also, when pouring the batter, let it spread on its own. Don't tilt the pan or some areas may stay flat.

I remember the ratio of sugar to corn flour as 2:1 by weight. It was either lessen the sugar to 50g or increase the cornflour to 33g. I went with decreasing the powdered sugar and it seemed to work, so here are the exact amounts I used based on the posted recipe:

6 large egg yolks

50g powdered sugar

25g corn flour

I baked at 425 F on the topmost rack in a closed oven. It took about 6 minutes for me but your results may vary.

tiger-skin.jpg

tiger-skin-underneath.jpg

underneath

tiger-skin-pliable.jpg

very pliable!

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Awesome. I was actually going to try this tonight just to see if I could make it work. Already have everything weighed out and ready to go for later. Looks like it worked just fine so I may not bother now. I'll keep the recipe around though.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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