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mitchellwarren

Unusual fruits and vegetables

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Just today, I came across and bought black apricots. They were tagged grown in the U.S. I've gotta say they were amazingly delicious, sweet, juicy and full of flavor. They tasted like a very, very good regular apricot but the flesh was just a little sweeter and the skin , which was indeed almost black, was just a little tarter. The whole thing was brimming with juice. Well worth the fancy price.

Also, I saw but did not buy, fresh garbanzo beans. Anyone know how to handle these?

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Also, I saw but did not buy, fresh garbanzo beans.  Anyone know how to handle these?

Here during certain times of the year vendors with cards sell whole garbanzo plants covered with the fresh beans, usually one or two to a pod. People buy them and eat them fresh as is. They are very nice. I've never tried cooking them but that might be good too.


"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

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Try eating the tender tips of the garbanzo plants as well. They are pleasantly tangy-sour. Could be added to a raw salad [after washing with pot. permanganate or short 10 second pulses in the microwave to sterilize], or to a cooked dish, like pea shoots. Added to red split lentil soup at the end to cook briefly, like spinach.

Then use the left-over plants for green manure in your garden--observe the rhizobial nodules on the roots, if sold with roots. Or give them to someone who has a small flock of urban dairy animals or poultry.


Edited by v. gautam (log)

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