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Welcome to Cookbooks & References -- one of two new forums devoted to books. This is where you’ll find the topics on the books we cook from (and, sometimes, one we'd never cook from) and those we turn to for advice on techniques and ingredients.

Topics in Cookbooks & References focus on discussion of the books themselves. Some of the current topics include Fergus Henderson's Nose To Tail Cookbook, Cookbooks You Actually Use To Cook or Giorgio Locatelli's Made In Italy. You'll find discussions of what happens when you use the books to cook in the Cooking forum and in the regional cooking subforums.

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Our members’ questions and comments make this forum interesting, exciting and useful – we look forward to your contributions. Before posting, you may want to browse through the forum to read up on current and older topics. If you’re looking for something specific, or wondering if there's already a topic on the subject you wish to discuss, try our Search feature (use the Advanced Usage Help link to improve your results) or our built-in Google Search function.

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