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Welcome to Cookbooks & References -- one of two new forums devoted to books. This is where you’ll find the topics on the books we cook from (and, sometimes, one we'd never cook from) and those we turn to for advice on techniques and ingredients.

Topics in Cookbooks & References focus on discussion of the books themselves. Some of the current topics include Fergus Henderson's Nose To Tail Cookbook, Cookbooks You Actually Use To Cook or Giorgio Locatelli's Made In Italy. You'll find discussions of what happens when you use the books to cook in the Cooking forum and in the regional cooking subforums.

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