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Travelogue: Back in the Big Mango


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"How can you live in Bangkok and not have eaten at Dosa King?  That's terrible!"

Maybe, if one has found Indian food not to one's liking, one might live in Bangkok without any intention of ever visiting Dosa King.

Maybe if one had a sense of humour, one might have appreciated the comment for what it was... :wink:

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"How can you live in Bangkok and not have eaten at Dosa King?  That's terrible!"

Maybe, if one has found Indian food not to one's liking, one might live in Bangkok without any intention of ever visiting Dosa King.

Maybe if one had a sense of humour, one might have appreciated the comment for what it was... :wink:

From past threads, I couldn't tell! :raz:

For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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June 26 – To Market, To Market

Earlier in the thread, Tim (TB88) had made the offer to do a trip up to Or Tor Kor. This isn’t something I’m likely to turn down, given that Tim has been in the thick of things here for the last few months.

Even better, he had the very civilized approach of doing the market at 11:00 a.m., rather than one of these insane dawn patrols that I normally get into.

Bonus.

I met Tim over at his work in progress – Butler’s - in the bottom of Gaysorn Plaza. I won’t go into a lot of detail now, as I’m going to cover him in more detail in a couple of days (non-linear time). But, having seen what he’s accomplishing at this time, I was even more grateful that he had the time for this trip in his schedule.

Tim, Pete (Tim’s sous chef), and I headed up from the Chidlom station to Mor Chit and the Chatuchak (JJ) market. Or Tor Kor – also known as the “rich man’s market” – had been on my list of “places to check out” for a few years now. It surfaces from time to time in the papers, and I always read through with interest. But you know me, I’m lazy.

When I’d first read of it, the main topic was how it was offering a source for the Royal Projects goods coming in. Prices here are higher than in the other markets, but you hope that you’re getting quality for that few extra baht. Hence “rich man’s market”.

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The market, across from Chatuchak, is the exact opposite of a tourist market. It’s clean, well organized, and there are wide walkways between the stands affording easy access. No scenic photo opps of rats gnawing on abandoned foodstuffs, or beggars clutching at buyers’ legs. Nope, this is a place meant for buying food. Good food. It’s that simple.

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That’s why Tim and Pete were here. To buy food. They had a list.

I appreciate it when people have a plan.

We hit the market and started checking things out. Tim’s already got a good feel for what’s what and where, and what the different ingredients are, and having Pete there made it perfect, as he could readily work out what the equivalents were for some of the things we were looking at.

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Flowers to begin with for Onigiri (Rona’s had her Dosa, that should keep her satisfied for a little while). I miss fresh flowers, having grown used to them being cheap and plentiful in Egypt. And when we were in Chiang Mai I would cross the Ping every morning to get fresh flowers from the Chinese market across from us.

Christopher Moore, in his novel Gambling On Magic, had an interest subtext of feng shui with flowers. I wonder if that’s being marketed?

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Along with flowers, the other thing I miss is fresh fruit. Rambutan, those wild Rastafarian lychees (yeah, somebody will take exception, but that’s how I see them) are an easy thing to have as a snack.

I started buying. I just can't help myself.

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And mangosteen are another favourite. The stains are nigh impossible to get out of your clothes, but the flavour is great.

Actually, come to think of it, these were my first two “Thai fruits” I had back in 1988 when I first came to the Land of Smiles, and part of the reason I keep returning.

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This was a surprise. This (according to the sign and Peter) is cham poo. And those leaves would be bai cham poo, the ones we were discussing in another thread for use in miang kam. I’d been thinking this was betel nut leaf.

The meat of the “rose apple” (as its called) is very crispy, more reminiscent of a Korean pear than an apple of any sort.

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And there were all sorts of exotic fruits, like cherries and peaches and apples available. And not all from the “farmers cooperatives”. We recognized the cherries as imports from the US. But they still looked good.

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Ah. The King of Fruits. Durian. This didn’t smell as bad a s I recall, and I wonder if this is the “odourless durian” from Laplae in Uttaradit? (What does kanyao mean?)

But what’s the point of durian if it doesn’t smell?

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and here’s a collection of various and sundry sundries. Eggplants, bamboo, chilies, kafir limes, and oranges.

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“I’m used to oranges being orange”, says Tim.

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I have a fetish from mushrooms having been influenced by reading the Lord of the Rings at too young an age.

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And I found these, another variety that falls under the Thai word for mushroom, but these are closer to the dessert truffles of the Arabian Peninsula, a mycoxia found in the hills of Kanchanaburi.

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And fresh young galanga.

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And I found bag after bag of the ginko nuts I’d enjoyed at Jok’s Kitchen (yup, another purchase).

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Asparagus. Thai asparagus, the small little shoots, is almost as good as the Bhutanese now.

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But you can only drool so much over greens. For real food porn you need meat. Either off the hoof, or out of the sea.

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Blue prawns, piled in ice.

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And shellfish galore to warm the blood cockles of your heart.

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Squid, not too big, but not as delicate as the Japanese (oh, I do miss those small, squirting little squids).

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Some nice looking scallops. Albeit denuded. I can taste the seared scallops with uni from the Four Seasons as I look at these.

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And with their clothes on they look even more attractive.

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And we found these roe, the size of grapes. It’s unclear where they come from, but it’s a fresh water fish from the Mekong. Given the size, I wonder if these are from those huge catfish they pull out of the river. You’ll get catfish on the order of 15 or 20 feet long from up there. Compared to these ballbearing-sized ova, the roe sack to the side is a mere dalliance.

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And I always enjoy facing down a crab. At least when it’s claws are tied up. It’s sort of an Arnold vs Terminator moment.

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This picture appeals to me in a French revolutionary sort of way.

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It’s a disarming thought to consider the number of paraplegic crabs that must be out there.

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And there were some stacozas, or tanglat, the thalidomide children of the crayfish world. Still, they’re almost all meat, and have a very sweet flavour. I like to lightly grill these back home, and then use them in a salad (yam).

gallery_22892_4853_42885.jpgThis was cute. Pete translated it as “if you find any metal in the food, bring it back”. There’d been problems before (but I recall it from around 2001) of some folks adding lead pellets to their seafood to get the weights up.

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Up above the high water mark there was plenty of good looking stuff, and it was easier to ascertain that it wasn’t carrying any buckshot. Dried meats. The wet jerkies of SouthEast Asia, sweet and soft to chew.

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And there was some beef with enough extra fat to make fries.

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I became quite excited at the offals. I could work with these.

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And there was plenty more attractive pork, similar to what we’d seen in Chinatown, but just a lot cleaner (and I like having things laid out on banana leaves. Don’t ask me why, it just feels nicer).

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And what’s a day at the market without some nice boudin (and all it entrails)?

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By this point we were starting to get really hungry. Food does that to us. Tim had a couple of options, and we weighed these appropriately. It seemed to be about the time to trot over somewhere for a bite.

Next – Options Weighed, Decisions Made

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June 26 – To Market, To Market

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Flowers to begin with for Onigiri (Rona’s had her Dosa, that should keep her satisfied for a little while).  I miss fresh flowers, having grown used to them being cheap and plentiful in Egypt.  And when we were in Chiang Mai I would cross the Ping every morning to get fresh flowers from the Chinese market across from us.

Christopher Moore, in his novel Gambling On Magic, had an interest subtext of feng shui with flowers.  I wonder if that’s being marketed?

gallery_22892_4853_82447.jpg

Along with flowers, the other thing I miss is fresh fruit.  Rambutan, those wild Rastafarian lychees (yeah, somebody will take exception, but that’s how I see them) are an easy thing to have as a snack.

I started buying.  I just can't help myself.

gallery_22892_4853_48697.jpg

And mangosteen are another favourite.  The stains are nigh impossible to get out of your clothes, but the flavour is great. 

Actually, come to think of it, these were my first two “Thai fruits” I had back in 1988 when I first came to the Land of Smiles, and part of the reason I keep returning.

[

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Ah.  The King of Fruits.  Durian.  This didn’t smell as bad a s I recall, and I wonder if this is the “odourless durian” from Laplae in Uttaradit?  (What does kanyao mean?)

But what’s the point of durian if it doesn’t smell? 

Awww, ya thought of me. Thanks! *does happy chair dance* Too bad no more lotus flowers. I was hoping to show our fellow egulleteers closed buds of the lotus. Oh well. The flowers are pretty and all females love flowers (hint. hint! Your long suffering wife may enjoy flowers tonight psst Peter get flowers ya nut!)

Mangosteens!!!!! :wub: They are my all time FAVORITE fruit. To me they are the king of fruits. You won't get stained if you know the trick to eating them ya silly fruit! (Hrm are you a nut or a fruit? Fruitnut? Nutfruit? :raz: )

Oh and the durian might have been the odorless kind. I didn't see any thing that said that. Ganyao actually is the type of durian and I can't remember what it conotates but it means long stemmed. *shrug* What can I say I like durian but I don't CRAVE durian. Are you a fan?

Looking forward to what you and Tim manage to get to eat! :)

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Awww, ya thought of me. Thanks! *does happy chair dance* Too bad no more lotus flowers. I was hoping to show our fellow egulleteers closed buds of the lotus. Oh well. The flowers are pretty and all females love flowers (hint. hint! Your long suffering wife may enjoy flowers tonight psst Peter get flowers ya nut!)

Mangosteens!!!!!  :wub: They are my all time FAVORITE fruit. To me they are the king of fruits. You won't get stained if you know the trick to eating them ya silly fruit! (Hrm are you a nut or a fruit? Fruitnut? Nutfruit?  :raz: )

Oh and the durian might have been the odorless kind. I didn't see any thing that said that. Ganyao actually is the type of durian and I can't remember what it conotates but it means long stemmed. *shrug* What can I say I like durian but I don't CRAVE durian. Are you a fan?

Looking forward to what you and Tim manage to get to eat! :)

Ok, so what's the secret? Eat them naked in the bath tub, like my Mom made me do with candy apples when I was little? We occasionaly get Mangosteens here in sunny, hot humid tropical South Florida. :laugh:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Awww, ya thought of me. Thanks! *does happy chair dance* Too bad no more lotus flowers. I was hoping to show our fellow egulleteers closed buds of the lotus. Oh well. The flowers are pretty and all females love flowers (hint. hint! Your long suffering wife may enjoy flowers tonight psst Peter get flowers ya nut!)

Mangosteens!!!!!  :wub: They are my all time FAVORITE fruit. To me they are the king of fruits. You won't get stained if you know the trick to eating them ya silly fruit! (Hrm are you a nut or a fruit? Fruitnut? Nutfruit?  :raz: )

Oh and the durian might have been the odorless kind. I didn't see any thing that said that. Ganyao actually is the type of durian and I can't remember what it conotates but it means long stemmed. *shrug* What can I say I like durian but I don't CRAVE durian. Are you a fan?

Looking forward to what you and Tim manage to get to eat! :)

Ok, so what's the secret? Eat them naked in the bath tub, like my Mom made me do with candy apples when I was little? We occasionaly get Mangosteens here in sunny, hot humid tropical South Florida. :laugh:

Ya cut them with a sharp knife all around horizontally then gently twist away from you. It should pop open the top exposing the sweet delectable flesh. Try to do this while not to wearing a white shirt. Eat and enjoy. Smile with delight! :wub:

Take anything I say with a grain of salt btw :wink::rolleyes: at self :raz:

Oh and if you like durian I was told by my housekeeper and father that montong or golden pillow is the best. Less smelly if I remember right and the one to try newbies on. Someone still in Thailand can probably correct me if I am remember that wrong. Hey it was 15 years ago cut me a break ok? :biggrin:

Edited by OnigiriFB (log)
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... if you like durian I was told by my housekeeper and father that montong or golden pillow is the best. Less smelly if I remember right and the one to try newbies on. Someone still in Thailand can probably correct me if I am remember that wrong. Hey it was 15 years ago cut me a break ok?  :biggrin:

But, do they still taste of a perfect combination of onion and gasoline?

For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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... if you like durian I was told by my housekeeper and father that montong or golden pillow is the best. Less smelly if I remember right and the one to try newbies on. Someone still in Thailand can probably correct me if I am remember that wrong. Hey it was 15 years ago cut me a break ok?  :biggrin:

But, do they still taste of a perfect combination of onion and gasoline?

*blink* er... I don't remember that... I do remember a smell like rotten onions though :raz: It took me 3 years to TRY durian and as I said earlier I like it but I dont CRAVE it. :biggrin:

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It may be an urban (or suburban....heck, rural) myth, but long ago friends of mine who'd lived in Malaysia talked of how the best durian were those that had been eaten by an elephant.

The elephant can't digest the durian, so they pass through, and lightly cook in the body heat. The durian are then collected and clamoured for.

Is this the first instance of sous vide?

:smile:

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It may be an urban (or suburban....heck, rural) myth, but long ago friends of mine who'd lived in Malaysia talked of how the best durian were those that had been eaten  by an elephant.

The elephant can't digest the durian, so they pass through, and lightly cook in the body heat.  The durian are then collected and clamoured for.

Is this the first instance of sous vide?

:smile:

Er... are you sure they weren't pulling a foreigner's leg? :blink::shock:

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It may be an urban (or suburban....heck, rural) myth, but long ago friends of mine who'd lived in Malaysia talked of how the best durian were those that had been eaten  by an elephant.

The elephant can't digest the durian, so they pass through, and lightly cook in the body heat.  The durian are then collected and clamoured for.

Is this the first instance of sous vide?

:smile:

:unsure: So, they collect it out of, er, elephant poo?

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It may be an urban (or suburban....heck, rural) myth, but long ago friends of mine who'd lived in Malaysia talked of how the best durian were those that had been eaten  by an elephant.

The elephant can't digest the durian, so they pass through, and lightly cook in the body heat.  The durian are then collected and clamoured for.

Is this the first instance of sous vide?

:smile:

Er... are you sure they weren't pulling a foreigner's leg? :blink::shock:

Like I said, it could very well be a rural myth.

But it's amazing what you can find behind a pachyderm.

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It may be an urban (or suburban....heck, rural) myth, but long ago friends of mine who'd lived in Malaysia talked of how the best durian were those that had been eaten  by an elephant.

The elephant can't digest the durian, so they pass through, and lightly cook in the body heat.  The durian are then collected and clamoured for.

Is this the first instance of sous vide?

:smile:

Er... are you sure they weren't pulling a foreigner's leg? :blink::shock:

Like I said, it could very well be a rural myth.

But it's amazing what you can find behind a pachyderm.

It would not be the only instance of foods improved by passage through digestive tracts. For example, argan oil is made from nuts that have passed through the digestive tracts of goats that eat the fruit of Argan trees.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

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It may be an urban (or suburban....heck, rural) myth, but long ago friends of mine who'd lived in Malaysia talked of how the best durian were those that had been eaten  by an elephant.

The elephant can't digest the durian, so they pass through, and lightly cook in the body heat.  The durian are then collected and clamoured for.

Is this the first instance of sous vide?

:smile:

Er... are you sure they weren't pulling a foreigner's leg? :blink::shock:

Like I said, it could very well be a rural myth.

But it's amazing what you can find behind a pachyderm.

It would not be the only instance of foods improved by passage through digestive tracts. For example, argan oil is made from nuts that have passed through the digestive tracts of goats that eat the fruit of Argan trees.

Or coffee from the civit cat in Vietnam, I think? But um... how does the elephant GET to the durian? I can't see the soft mouth of a pachyderm taking well to the spikes of the durian fruit. If they are eating just the fruit...er... Ok that's taking the SE Asian fetish for elephants a bit far. Methinks someone was drunk and his friends were playing a joke? You know us Thais we like to rawren sanuk sanuk. :raz:

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June 26 – Momentous Decisions

Our choices for lunch tipped two scales with roughly equal ponderance.

We could grab something in the market stalls, or we could move over to a sit down restaurant.

When given a choice like there is only one answer…..

“Yes”.

Our choice made we settled first on the sit down part of the meal, and postponed our market stalling for after.

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The sit down portion turned out to be a bit more challenging than we’d anticipated. The restaurant - “Sutjai kaiyang” – Sutjai grilled chicken (?) - (they advertise somtam, too) was packed to the gills.

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It was just after noon, and there was a line stringing out from the entrance into the parking lot.

This would mean we’d have to wait.

Lines are like that.

However, as Pete pointed out, people generally don’t linger over lunches in Thailand. Not unless there’s a few bottles around, then it’s another matter. But the people here had business, and so were more interested in getting a good meal in a short period of time.

Digesting that, it was obvious that we should go for some ice coffee.

Right across the parking lot was an old style Thai ice coffee place that Tim liked. That’s good enough recommendation for me. We dropped our considerable load of groceries, and ordered some ice tea and ice coffee.

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It’s a nice little place. Kafe Sot? (As bad as I am with standard Thai script, it gets really confusing with the stylized versions). Lots of junk hanging off of everything, and a nice tree in the back with a shrine.

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I like these, especially when there ther for the spirits of the trees. It’s the Vancouverite in me. We’re strange for trees. But we didn’t stop here to pray, we stopped here for ice coffee.

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Thai ice coffee is a wonderful thing. Thick, dark coffee poured through a lump of condensed milk in a cheese cloth into a mass of ice cubes. These are better than milkshakes (and I like milkshakes).

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They were also selling a “fruit wine” drink called Kamikaze. What fruit wines have to do with suicidal aircraft, I’m not quite sure, but I made a note (which I misplaced) to get a bottle at Robinson’s later to try out.

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We relaxed over these and killed a few minutes trading stories of Thailand, New York, and everywhere. It was hot, I was dripping, but an ice cold coffee or tea can make the time go very pleasantly.

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Sure enough, once we’d finished our drinks and traversed the 20 m back to the restaurant, there was no line up blocking the crash helmeted and caped rooster. This was a good sign.

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Of course we had to order the chicken. Nicely marinaded, lightly grilled, with harldy any burn, and the meat cooked fully through. Good, but I’d still probably give pride of place to Likhit Gaiyang over near Rachadamnoern (although I haven’t checked it out since the fire, and the demonstrations would keep me away this trip).

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Not one of their house specials here, but I hardly ever let the opportunity to eat pork pass me by. Tim shares my view. Pork is good. Especially grilled pork neck in Thailand. This was quite nice, not overcooked at all, as it can often be in beer joints (not that I want you to think that I frequent beer joints!)

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What they did have a house special (besides the chicken) was the som tam. This was was loaded with fluffy catfish, something you see a lot of in yams, but here came with papaya.

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And then a som tam Thai, with the ubiquitous tomatoes. One can never have too much som tam.

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And sticky rice (khao niao). You have to have khao niao. Plastic wrapped to avoid drying. Not as pretty as the bamboo baskets, but just as effective.

A very good Isaan Thai meal, and with the heat and humidity it was worthwhile for an old guy like me to take the break. Plus, I know had a place here to base from when I came back.

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But we could only stay still for so long. The market was calling to us.

Or was that Tim’s cell phone?

Next – Once More Into The Breach

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Darn!

I wish I was back in Thailand.

I just got one of those emails that has me gnawing on my fingers.

If anyone's interested, the Dusit is doing a wine dinner on the 23rd showcasing the wines from Granmonte in the Asoke Valley of Thailand. I would really like it if someone (hint, hint) can catch this and report.

One, I'm interested in what the Thai are trying to do with grapes and their soil. I think the recent move to tempranillos is a good thing, and I've had some chardonnays that aren't bad.

Second, Khun Nikki is the first female Thai winemaker, and it would very interesting to hear her take on things.

Third, I'm always interested in how to pair against the overpowering spices in Thai foods. Generally I lean towards either a clean cutting chardonnay, or else a gewurtz or riesling, but I want to see what they say. (I still hold that champagne works with anything).

PM me with an email address, and I can forward you the menu (I've got it in my yahoo). It'll be at Benjarong, the Dusit's Thai restaurant.

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I haven't come across it loaded into a papaya salad, but it it wants to be a yam plaa dook foo, then, in the words of Popeye "I yam, what I yam".

Tasted good, whatever we call it. I like that crumbly texture with the crunch of the som tam.

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I haven't come across it loaded into a papaya salad, but it it wants to be a yam plaa dook foo, then, in the words of Popeye "I yam, what I yam".

Tasted good, whatever we call it.  I like that crumbly texture with the crunch of the som tam.

I believe the papaya/som tam is more a northern/isaan thing. Central plains area does it with unripe mango. I only know this because my auntie loves that dish and throws a hissy fit if it isn't served "correctly", i.e. with unripe mango.

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I wouldn’t say that I’m against vegetarian restaurants. I can’t think of a single instance when I’ve had a bone to pick with them.
It’s a disarming thought to consider the number of paraplegic crabs that must be out there.
. . . the thalidomide children of the crayfish world.
And what’s a day at the market without some nice boudin (and all it entrails)?

Peter, I am not sure which I enjoy more – the markets, the food, or perhaps the puns, scattered through the narrative like [pick your metaphor, depending how you feel about puns]. Outstanding!

Edited to be less cheeky.

Edited by C. sapidus (log)
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I haven't come across it loaded into a papaya salad, but it it wants to be a yam plaa dook foo, then, in the words of Popeye "I yam, what I yam".

Tasted good, whatever we call it.  I like that crumbly texture with the crunch of the som tam.

I believe the papaya/som tam is more a northern/isaan thing. Central plains area does it with unripe mango. I only know this because my auntie loves that dish and throws a hissy fit if it isn't served "correctly", i.e. with unripe mango.

That's an interesting gradation I hadn't thought about. But you're right, I didn't see as much som tam (or tam maahaan) in Central Plains cuisine when I wandered through there (although that was a brief wander), and I did see more green mango (which I don't see much of in Laos). Similar to how how you can sort of split the country between coconut milk based curries in the Plains and South, and drier curries in the North and NorthEast.

Likewise, one of my friends (well, rather the wife of my friend, from Khorat) was very unhappy with their trip to Chiang Mai. She liked the town well enough, but there wasn't any decent som tam to be had. Sort of like what happens when you separate a Korean from kim chi.

Edited by Peter Green (log)
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June 26 – Market Forces

I would hold that markets, as a concentration of edible mass, exert a specific attractive force upon random bodies, causing them either to fall into an elliptical orbit around the market, or else to be drawn completely in.

I’m one of those ones that just gets sucked in.

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Our plan was to graze for more bits and pieces, and to pick up the heavier items (juices). But it’s hard not to stop and wave at cheerful little tomatoes such as these, whose kin we’d fed upon in our som tam.

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And conider these tiny cabbages. Halfway between a cabbage proper and an overlarge brussel sprout, about the size of my three middle fingers.

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I picked up a bag of the garlic on the right. It’s the wee little stuff from around Chiang Mai that has such a nice burn. This alongside grilled Korean meats is a treat for back home.

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Ah, here’s a proper dessert. Mango and sticky rice, the rice all sweet with coconut cream.

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And for nibbles there are plenty of the little egg yolk candies like I’d had at the Four Seasons a few nights back.

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While not much has been happening above the surface, the current situation with the government is on everyone’s mind. To one side I found some very nice, very fresh pomelo being infused with the current censure debate.

I wonder? Does that give it a bitter taste, or is it more numbing?

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There were all sorts of bits and pieces wrapped up in sheets of gluten (what’s the Thai name for that stuff?). And you can see the active ferment going on in the ballooning of the bags of “stuff” to the side.

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There were also puffy bags of mushrooms. “Het ton”. What does “ton” mean in this case? The fungus itself hung in the fluid like those odd samples in jars at Siriraj Hospital.

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And the crabs, while not blowing up party balloons, had a nice, evil ferment about them, too. My mouth was watering at the thought of kejang in Korea, that softly rotting crab meat, slathered in sauce.

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The mounds of shredded pork looked good, all sweetness and stickiness, as opposed to the airy, light brown gossamer we usually see in the MBK port stores.

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Back towards the fish they were also selling fresh chestnuts. How is it that chestnuts and fish go together? I can’t really say, but the mix of smells was interesting.

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There was no shortage of wet stuff all prepped and ready to go. Curries and sauces, and pickled things.

Oh, my.

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And these were…..sardines? Or mackerel? I'm horrible with fish. I know what shark looks like. Whatever, the meat looked excellent, black and falling apart in the soy and spices.

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I grabbed a bag of little intestine sacks stuffed with pork fat and other bits of the pig you’ll never identify in a lineup. Unskewered I can pop these like candy. Greasy candy, mind you…..

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But, there was no shortage of stuff on sticks. The squid had that lightly charred smell it gets, and the tentacles looked like it’d be worth having one or two.

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To the side were piles of good satay. But my appetite was beginning to flag. The attractive forces holding me to the market were beginning to flag.

Khun Pete came through like a hero. He’d been asking around quietly for the bai cham poo that I’ve been looking for for ages, and found a place that had it by the bundle. I bought up three bundles, and made plans for dinner back home.

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In a last burst of willpower, I did follow Tim’s cue regarding these buns. These are the ones I was eating back in the earlier June 26 posting, the centers filled with green pandan custard. Tim loves these, and I can understand why.

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We took a last swing through the dry goods section, admiring the rinds and mushrooms…..

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and a trip to a Thai market isn’t a trip unless I get to see some sacks of chilis.

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And then we skidded past the rice bins. Jasmin, high grade, medium grade, black, purple, blue…there’s more colour and variety than at a Harajuku hair salon (smells nice, too).

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Our last stop was the heavy stuff, the fluids. Tim had some to pick up, and I was beglamoured by the tiger herbal. We inquired as to what it was, and the answer, deftly translated was “water with stuff in it”.

We were done. And just in time, as there was the lightest spattering of rain coming down. We were all about to get in a taxi to get back to mor chit with our sacks of purchases, when I noticed that the Kamphaeng Phet underground station was right here.

I love this place. This market just moved up to the top of my list, with perfect accessibility!

I made quick farewells with Pete and Tim, and we arranged to meet again on Saturday (but I’ll talk more of that later). This had been a great morning out. Good company, a new market with aisles big enough to accommodate either an elephant or me, and the delight of finding easy access for the future.

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Once home I unpacked the groceries into the fridge, and started looking over some of my extended lunch. (and you can see the eating of it back here)

Next - Old Friends

Edited for the nonlinear effects of time

Edited by Peter Green (log)
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