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Peas


SobaAddict70
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I picked up a pound and a half of English shelling peas at Union Square Greenmarket today.

I can probably see three meals out of these...

Linguine with cippolini onions, summer savory and peas

Pea soup with lamb's quarters and fennel

maybe a pea flan....

Tell me how you make yours.

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Unzip and munch.

Lightly steam and butter.

Anything that doesn't turn them to mush or bury the fresh flavor. I save those dishes for frozen pea season.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I vote for "unzip and munch" - there's just nothing like a fresh, raw pea.

Another thing I do is slice raw carrots, and make a "peas and carrots" salad, with a balsamic vinaigrette. I guess that I feel that cooking them doesn't really do them justice.

If you have to cook them, I'd say to sautee some finely diced onion in olive oil, add some bacon cut into small pieces and browned, add the fresh shelled peas and a splash of white wine, and cook the peas, covered, briefly without overcooking them. I guess this would be "piselli alla romana".

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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I like peas with cream though, like the others, I prefer them raw as I do most of my vegetables. The creamy, buttery sauce with peas is awfully good served over poached sole.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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I'll be putting mine into some orzo cooked with onion and chicken stock mixed with a litle butter and parmiggiano to be served alongside vadouvan roast goat loin and sauteed shiitake mushrooms. I'm looking forward to these as the season is short. For dessert, fresh local strawberries and balsamico.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Some years back, I saw a recipe on Two Fat Ladies that was for peas with steamed lettuce. I made it several times with great success. Unfortunately, I misplaced the recipe and haven't been able to recover that exact same one since.

Anybody out there have it?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Some years back, I saw a recipe on Two Fat Ladies that was for peas with steamed lettuce.  I made it several times with great success.  Unfortunately, I misplaced the recipe and haven't been able to recover that exact same one since.

Anybody out there have it?

Don't have the 2FL one, but Julia's in Mastering the Art of French Cooking Volume One is classic and good.

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Stash, what pea flan recipe do you use? I once had a fantastic one at Olives but haven't tried the recipe in the book ever.

I haven't really thought about it. Basic flan is really a sweetened egg custard. So this will be along those lines except its savory.

gallery_1890_1967_263060.jpg

Fresh carrot pasta with cippolini onions, peas and red sorrel

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I made pea risotto the other night. Used vialone nano rice. The broth was made with the backs of a few chickens. Then, after that, I cooked the pea pods in the mild chicken broth. That was pureed in the blender and strained through a fine sieve to make a "pea broth" that I used in making the risotto. Nice way to get all the pea flavor out of English shell peas.

--

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Thomas Keller has a cold pea soup recipe that involves vegetable broth, truffle oil and Parmesan crisps and is well worth the effort -- we wait all year for fresh peas from the market (cursing the pea vines).

I also like peas and any pasta dish that can be tweaked to involve cream and/or shellfish.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Thomas Keller has a cold pea soup recipe that involves vegetable broth, truffle oil and Parmesan crisps and is well worth the effort -- we wait all year for fresh peas from the market (cursing the pea vines).

I also like peas and any pasta dish that can be tweaked to involve cream and/or shellfish.

I love pea soup. This one was served warm, but could be served cool. Taste is wonderful either way. I drizzled some fage mixed with cream over the top. I'm fortunate to get shelled peas from a nearby market.

Waitman is right..they are worth the wait.

gallery_24065_1826_37795.jpg

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Some years back, I saw a recipe on Two Fat Ladies that was for peas with steamed lettuce.  I made it several times with great success.  Unfortunately, I misplaced the recipe and haven't been able to recover that exact same one since.

Anybody out there have it?

Don't have the 2FL one, but Julia's in Mastering the Art of French Cooking Volume One is classic and good.

Thanks. I've got that book (of course) and will earmark that recipe to try. Appreciate it.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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SLKinsey - I simmer the pea pods in stock all the time, but are you saying that you then pureed the pods as well?  That's a cool idea.

Yea. Well, I wouldn't call it a "purée." Pea pods are pretty fibrous, so the best you can hope for is to thoroughly shred them in the blender and liberate as much Spring goodness and green peaness as possible. Then you strain through a fine sieve to hold back all the fibrous shreds. It added quite a bit of flavor, a little thickness and a very nice pale green color to the stock.

--

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I've just got to ask does that have the sorrel tang a lemony sour, to me it looks like Rhubarb Chard.

Never seen red sorrel and googling keeps showing either sheep/red sorrel or common like here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_sorrel

That looks much more like this baby rhubarb chard intrested to know if it is the same thing http://curlydock.wordpress.com/2007/03/07/...-rhubarb-chard/

Perfection cant be reached, but it can be strived for!
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PCD/sadistick -- it is most definitely red sorrel. The leaves have that characteristic tang. A little goes a long way. I've been using it mostly in pasta, salads and omelettes as a flavor accenter. Also experimenting with it as a substitute for basil.

ETA that the vendor I picked it up from calls it red sorrel so I assume they would know. FYI those of you who shop regularly at USGM, it's the same stall that sells edible nasturtium petals.

ETA #2 -- Pic here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsilva/2539975619/

ETA #3 -- More info here: http://loveapplefarm.typepad.com/growbette...orrel---su.html

Chard is larger in size, with thicker stalks and sizeable leaves.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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I wish I could get some over here but it really does look like baby rhubarb chard to me, I agree full grown chard is larger. Though I have seen baby rhubarb chard frequently looking exactly like that.

I just wondered whether it was a country thing thing like Zucchini/Courgette but it looks impressive if it is sorrel.

Thankyou for the clarification as you said it's got the sour must be as chard certainly doesn't.

Perfection cant be reached, but it can be strived for!
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Simplest thing in the world -- I invented it one night because of what was to hand: peas with pesto. Shell and cook the peas. Toss them with pesto and a bit of olive oil. My kids went nuts for them.

I also lost to throw some peas into a lemon risotto.

Paul B

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