Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
u2star

Chocolate DVD's From Culinary Institute?

Recommended Posts

3DVD made by the the Culinary Institute of America CIA

Hand formed chocolat, filled chocolate and brittles & more.

I am a beginning Chocolatier and was wondering if anyone here has had a chance to view these dvd's. If so, did you find them informative or helpful??

Any other Chocolate (tempering, molding, etc) dvd's you recommend for those of us just starting out??

Thanks so much.

Diane


AwholeLottaChocolate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3DVD made by the the Culinary Institute of America CIA

Hand formed chocolat, filled chocolate and brittles & more.

I am a beginning Chocolatier and was wondering if anyone here has had a chance to view these dvd's.  If so, did you find them informative or helpful??

Any other Chocolate (tempering, molding, etc) dvd's you recommend for those of us just starting out??

Thanks so much.

Diane

I know I learned how to temper and mold chocolate from watching DVDs put out by our very own Kerry Beal (aka The Chocolate Doctor). You might check her website: www.thechocolatedoctor.ca


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3DVD made by the the Culinary Institute of America CIA

Hand formed chocolat, filled chocolate and brittles & more.

I am a beginning Chocolatier and was wondering if anyone here has had a chance to view these dvd's.  If so, did you find them informative or helpful??

Any other Chocolate (tempering, molding, etc) dvd's you recommend for those of us just starting out??

Thanks so much.

Diane

I know I learned how to temper and mold chocolate from watching DVDs put out by our very own Kerry Beal (aka The Chocolate Doctor). You might check her website: www.thechocolatedoctor.ca

Anna-

Thanks so much. I am going to take a look at her site.

Sincerely

Diane


AwholeLottaChocolate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the recommendation of Kerry's DVDs. They are wonderfully concise, and have been enormously helpful in my amateur endeavors.


Patty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I signed up for Smart Flix and ordered all three of these DVDs. I just got and watched the 3rd in the series "Brittle & More". It's great for a newbie like me to see someone demonstrating the techniques I've read about, but based on this DVD I wouldn't recommend this series in lieu of reference books.

They seem to assume that people watching the videos already have some knowledge of the subject. For example, when they demonstrated caramel making, there was no mention made of whether to use low or high heat, or what affect that would have on the final product – so one would already need to know that caramel needs to heat slowly. There's also no mention of how long different steps should take. The syrup he was heating to make a peanut brittle appeared to reach thread stage in a matter of seconds.

It's basically a demonstration with very little explanation of what's happening or how long it takes. A great companion piece to a good reference book, but not a substitute.

Oh, and also, while the CIA site says the DVD is over 2hrs long, it's a half hour at most. Maybe it's 2 hours for the entire set of 3?


Edited by emmalish (log)

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For example, when they demonstrated caramel making, there was no mention made of whether to use low or high heat, or what affect that would have on the final product – so one would already need to know that caramel needs to heat slowly.

Really? Why? I always caramelize sugar on high heat, and have been happy so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For example, when they demonstrated caramel making, there was no mention made of whether to use low or high heat, or what affect that would have on the final product – so one would already need to know that caramel needs to heat slowly.

Really? Can you explain why? I always caramelize sugar on high heat, and have been happy so far, but if there is a better way, it would be good to know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Really?  Can you explain why?  I always caramelize sugar on high heat, and have been happy so far, but if there is a better way, it would be good to know.

Really? Trust me, I'm no expert, but every reference I've found that has mentioned heat, has specified a low temperature. This is from the eGCI Confectionary 101...

A long slow cooking will give a softer, mellower toffee. The principal cause of toughness and lack of flavour in caramel are high temperatures and inferior materials.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, I used to think I was a perfectionist, maybe its time to admit I'm only a perfectionist sometimes, and the rest of the time I'm really impatient! I'll have to start reading those recipes!

OK, back to the topic at hand. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hee! Yeah, I'm an occasional perfectionist too.

Oh, and I hope my "Really?" didn't come across as mocking your "Really?" It didn't even occur to me until I just re-read the post. Whoops. It was an honest "Really?"


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are 4 (well, a little more actually, but for to avoid the chemistry lesson we'll go with 4) things that influence caramalization - strength of a reducing sugar (not all sugars are created equal), type of protein, heat, and time. because heat and time are related (if you use high heat, you're going to reach your desired solids level more quickly, thus exposing your caramel to less time on heat), there's a direct relationship to degree of caramalization. lower heats mean it takes longer to hit your solids level, which means you've got more time exposed to heat which is the catalyst for the sugars/protein (ie caramel) reaction to occur.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
there are 4 (well, a little more actually, but for to avoid the chemistry lesson we'll go with 4) things that influence caramalization - strength of a reducing sugar (not all sugars are created equal), type of protein, heat, and time.  because heat and time are related (if you use high heat, you're going to reach your desired solids level more quickly, thus exposing your caramel to less time on heat), there's a direct relationship to degree of caramalization.  lower heats mean it takes longer to hit your solids level, which means you've got more time exposed to heat which is the catalyst for the sugars/protein (ie caramel) reaction to occur.

Somehow I thought that slower caramelization increased your risk of undesireable crystallization, especially in wet caramels. Apparently not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ah, crystallization is another topic entirely 8-) a good technical reference for that is written by rich hartel (U Wisc) :

http://www.amazon.com/Crystallization-Food...l/dp/0834216345

it'll be pretty technical. xtallization has more to do with how a product is cooled, agitated, and seeded than how it's heated. there are also interference ingredients you can add to minimize xtallization

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By eglies
      Hello everyone!
       
      Id like your advise about freezing bonbons. 
       
      Lets say i would start to freeze my bonbons now in the summer for Christmas. Would they last for such an extended period of time?
      Also using natural colouring, would the colour remain as good when i open them up after a couple of months?
       
      Would be great to hear your thoughts and experiences on the matter  
      Thank you!
       
    • By eglies
      Hey guys!
       
      Ive been having some difficulty with Valhrona Milk 38%. It doesn't seem to temper like any other milk chocolate. 
      I melt the chocolate to 45C and then using the seeding technique i drop the temp down to 30C. 
      When at 30C it seems tempered but after a few minutes i start to see bad tempering results. 
       
      Is there something in particular about this chocolate that i should know about?
    • By pastrygirl
      My supplier decided that cocoa butter is now special order so I had to buy a case. And now I have an excessive amount of cocoa butter, anyone need any?  
       
      Cacao Barry cocoa butter pistoles with a best by date of April 2021   $66 for the 3 kg tub or $22 per kg plus shipping. 
       
       
    • By eglies
      Hi guys,
       
      Please help, I prepare my chocolate in melting pot all good perfect temper leave it overnight in melting pot covered and at the correct temperature, when I come in the morning its thicker and need to use heat gun to rewarm it. I am worried about it going out of temper. Any tricks to recommend?
       
      Thanks
       
    • By pastrygirl
      This looks interesting - I know some of us have lamented the lack of flavor or off flavors of additives to colored cocoa butter - anyone seen or tried these?  Looks like they can be used either to mix into chocolate as a fat-based flavor or to decorate molds as usual with colored CB ...  More expensive than Valrhona Inspiration or regular colored CB, I wonder how they compare in flavor intensity, the Valrhonas I've tried were fairly intense.  I also wonder what flavors brown, black, and amber are ... https://www.pcb-creation.com/pure-emotion-colour-by-pcb-creation/?lang=en

       
      Edited to add: the black/ brown flavors are chocolate, of course! 🙃
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...