Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Fat Guy

Potato Puree, Mashed Potatoes, Pommes

Recommended Posts

I'd like to add that it does not take any fancy equipment to par-cook the potatoes...and you certainly don't have to sous-vide them....you don't even need ultra-precise temp controls...a decent thermometer and a pot of water is all you need.

I use the technique often, and the potatoes are fine anywhere from 65-70C and the time is forgiving as well (since the key is to just make sure that the potatoes are to temp throughout). It's not as temp sensitive as say an egg or a piece of protein.

For inch thick slices 30-45 minutes is fine. Thicker potatoes (like say if you want to cook whole potatoes in their skins) will take a good deal longer.


Edited by Renn (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My use of the phrase "sous vide" was incorrect. What I meant to say was a temperature controlling device typically used in the application of sous vide cooking, i.e. a water bath of some sort. I would actually think it would be detrimental to sous vide the potatoes.

Of course it is possible to maintain a constant temp with a thermometer and a pot of water, it's just takes a lot more babysitting. My main point in my post is that this technique is typically done in kitchens that are equipped with water baths and TICs where you won't have to babysit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...a decent thermometer and a pot of water is all you need.

Agreed, even though I do use the waterbath. If you have one it's easy. If you don't it's not all that difficult and what most people do anyway.


My soup looked like an above ground pool in a bad neighborhood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this is the correct forum?

How do you make the perfect mashed potato? I would love measurements, so that I can test accurately.

So far, I boil the potatoes (2 average sized) until soft enough to to put through a ricer, then I add about 2 teaspoons of milk and a knob of butter, whip around a little bit until a reasonably smooth blob materialises. I think this is nice, but I've tasted much nicer, like old Grandma's mashed potato; I don't know what she did, or added (maybe just double cream?) but it was absolutely delicious.

How do you make the PERFECT mashed potato?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I'm aware there is no perfect measurement, potatoes vary too much to be able to do that. I do have a couple of tips though and I make the best mashed potato in the world :raz:

Put your potato through a ricer, twice (or if you have one a drum sieve). If using some milk (or cream though this tastes completely different as you might imagine) make sure it is warm before you put it in, add it gradually. My preference is to use butter, lots of it, beat it in with a fork and keep adding and tasting as you go, you'll be amazed how much you can get incorporated. Remember to season well as you go.


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find a Cara potato works best - we use one grown on a patch that the grower uses very little water during the growing of them so the skins are quite hardy but the flesh, when cooked is a really good balance between firmness and flouryness.

Pedantically I find a gentle simmer is better than a boil as it seems the potato absorbs less water. The size you boil them at can also affect the final outcome - not too big, not too small. And then obviously once drained, back on the heat to mash to let any further water evaporate before adding warm butter and milk (with a bay leaf in) as Matthew says.


Edited by bakerestates (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies and in that link you posted, there is an incredible method. I can't wait to try mashed potato now, though there looks to be a LOT of butter used!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a note that there's no need to peel the potatoes after cooking. Simply cut them in half and rice them cut side down. Remove the peel from the ricer before moving on to the next half. Saves your fingers and a lot of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Qwerty - you're right - the biggest key, according to Bouley, was not overworking the starch - which is why you rice, and not put in a blender like you might a celery root puree, or leek/fennel puree, etc....

People actually do potato puree in a blender? :unsure:

I had thanksgiving dinner at a friend's once and couldn't wait to taste her mashed potatoes – she proudly told me how light and fluffy she made them. She made them in a mixer. Not a blender, but she still worked the hell out of them. They were a gluey gloppy lumpy mess. And yes, she thought they were perfect.


Edited by emmalish (log)

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=31701

The trick is to retrograde the starch - cook the potatoes at 65C until that temperature all through say 30 mins, then cool rapidly in cold water.

After that you cn do pretty well anything and they wont go gluey, even boiling and then using a food processor. They will also reheat


Edited by jackal10 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just a note that there's no need to peel the potatoes after cooking.  Simply cut them in half and rice them cut side down.  Remove the peel from the ricer before moving on to the next half.  Saves your fingers and a lot of time.

Nice Tip!


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure if this is the correct forum?

How do you make the perfect mashed potato? I would love measurements, so that I can test accurately.

So far, I boil the potatoes (2 average sized)  until soft enough to to put through a ricer, then I add about 2 teaspoons of milk and a knob of butter, whip around a little bit until a reasonably smooth blob materialises. I think this is nice, but I've tasted much nicer, like old Grandma's mashed potato; I don't know what she did, or added (maybe just double cream?) but it was absolutely delicious.

How do you make the PERFECT mashed potato?

Salt and pepper would be a start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have noticed in French supermarkets they stock many vegetable purees.

The other day in Lidl (a German supermarket in my home town Cheltenham UK) There was one of these which was 'Puree de pommes de terre', Kartoffel Puree and a few more languages.

I will be having some tonight with a couple of Bratwurst and Broad beans.

Prepared as per instructions it is excellent, truly delicious .

With garlic and such, you could play tunes on it.

:biggrin:


Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I like to put them through a ricer for a smoother texture and other times I'm in the mood for a more rustic texture and use the old fashioned bent wire masher. For flavor and texture I add butter, cream and milk or any combination of those ingredients as well as salt and pepper of course. Roasted garlic adds a nice flavor if you want to go there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure if this is the correct forum?

How do you make the perfect mashed potato? I would love measurements, so that I can test accurately.

How do you make the PERFECT mashed potato?

Don't change how you cook your potato, but make sure that the water you're cooking them in is very well salted. Instead of milk, use cream. Melt your butter into your cream. Make about twice as much of this butter/cream mixture as you think you are likely to need, and just keep adding adding adding. Then add as much salt as you think it could possibly take, taste it, and you will probably need to keep adding adding adding salt also.

You don't need measurements, just trust your tastebuds. Especially with regard to the salt. You have to be aggressive with the seasoning.

I like the tiniest tiniest splash of vinegar but it isn't necessary.


Edited by RossyW (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I basically use Fat Guy's method but using a mixer to mash the potatoes. They turn out very tasty. I guess the key is just not overworking them.


Edited by Ndy (log)

At the age of six I wanted to be a cook. At seven I wanted to be Napoleon. And my ambition has been growing steadily ever since. ‐ Salvador Dali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found that using a whisk like a masher (stabbing down on the taters with the tines) works the best. We have a potato masher in the resturant I work, and I've never used it in leu of the whisk.

I also like melting a little cream cheese in some cream and butter on the stove then throw in finely chopped fresh rosemary to the liquid. Mash this into the taters. Good stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the IP makes the best Mashed Potatoes Ive ever made.  and I am a serious student of the MP's

 

my favorite is Russet, small ones  ( more skin / pot. )  in the 5 lbs bags.

 

I pressure steam them after cutting them up and always leave the skin on.   I use the GiftedBasked which makes it easy to take them out of the pot when done.

 

I drain the water left over in the bottom of the Pot  ( 1 cup does the trick ) and place the potatoes back in the pot to let them stay warm and evaporate some of the

 

water.   I have hot milk ready  ( micro's in a Pyrex measuring cup ) and room temp butter.

 

I Smoosh the potatoes frist w the beater, might wait a bit for more steam to evaporate, then add the butter and Mix.

 

IP MashedP's.jpg

 

note the Sunbeam seems to have been designed for the IP, it hangs on the ledge.   the a little fresh grated nutmeg, just a little   ( you want to know something is in

 

these Pots. but not be to sure what it is )   then the milk gradually added until smooth.

 

if I keep them for a bit, I cover with a clean " tea towel ' so water doesn't drip back down in the potatoes.

 

Pressure Steam is quick, fool proof, and all the potato flavor stays in the potato  not the water.

 

were not making soup here .

 

:biggrin:

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You use a beater to make mashed potatoes, rotuts? I have always found that if I use a mixer/beater I get gluey potatoes, no matter what kind of potatoes I used.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

""   if I use a mixer/beater I get gluey potatoes, no matter what kind of potatoes ""

 

​for me, only the waxy potatoes get gluey.  I use a hand masher for those.

 

I mix in the butter first on low

 

( some where i read this 'coasts' the potato pieces  ---  I doubt this but do it )

 

​and the milk has to be really hot    Cold milk == gluey potatoes of any kind.

 

and maybe more milk thank you think, but added gradually.    get very fluffy  russets.

 

I have a very old hand masher that was my mothers   Similar to this one :

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009LN49JK?keywords=hand%20masher&qid=1445517522&ref_=sr_1_7&sr=8-7


Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find if I use something like a blender or food processor for potatoes they get gluey. But no problem with the Mixmaster.

 

I made something akin to a cross of colcannon and champ in the regular pressure cooker - made the mistake of forgetting to coat the potatoes with butter first - glued potato pieces to the bottom of the pot that got pretty brown.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PS :   I also think full fat milk works much better than non-fat for fluffiness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband uses a hand mixer for mashed potatoes. My dad's always used the KitchenAid with the flat beater. I've never had gluey mashed potatoes made by either man. And yes, making mashed potatoes does seem to be a strictly male endeavor in my family!

  • Like 1

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I may have to try again to use a mixer I guess. I gave up doing that years ago, but, maybe there were other factors involved at the time (i.e. perhaps I didn't warm the milk enough back then). On the other hand, I haven't minded not using a mixer either since I like my mashed potatoes a little bit lumpy - just not gluey. I normally just use the old fashioned potato masher method (as I am often too lazy to clean out a ricer or take the extra time it consumes to use one either).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

""  making mashed potatoes does seem to be a strictly male endeavor in my family ""

 

In my experience

 

Boys Like Tools.

 

Mixer A  or Mixer B   

 

etc.

 

there it is

 

as long as its 5 star  MP's   ....

 

​My mother used a very old MixMaster.  I still have it   

 

its been mentioned on 'threads'

 

I used  both a KA glass bowl mixer   ( a very old one,  gifted to me    still have it  )

 

the thick glass bowl was warmed w hot water  ....

 

​then when I got the newer KA mixers  I used that.

 

the most delicious MP's  I feel are Russets, not so big for Baking, cleaned, etc   and PressureSteamed

 

​( we are not making soup )

 

then butter, very hot milk and there you go

 

please do not forget a tiny bit of fresh grated nutmeg, 'from the Whole Nut ' when you do this

 

just finely grate the Nut to get down to the aromatic part  :   two to three grates to get to the stuff you want

 

how can your tell  ?  take a sniff.


Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...